Ms. Quinson's 2011-2012 9H Blog

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“…it’s because he wants to stay inside.”

May1

Tonight please read chapters 21, 22, and 23 of To Kill a Mockingbird.   Then write your response.  Please consider the following questions:

  • What passage or passages strike you as interesting or singular and why?
  • What questions do you want to discuss with the class tomorrow?
  • Why do you think these questions may generate interesting discussion?

Annotate!

Find great passages to discuss in class.

Make sure you quiz yourself each and every night on your vocabulary flashcards.  If you do, you are sure to ace the vocabulary section of ourMockingbird assessment.

56 Comments to

““…it’s because he wants to stay inside.””

  1. May 1st, 2012 at 6:42 pm      Reply johnk4 Says:

    I thought the decision when Atticus lets the children stay to be an interesting choice. Any ordinary parent would want to act like Aunt Alexandria and want to shield Jem and Scout from the harsh reality of the court. However I think Atticus realizes that they are going to see this later in life. Also he could have just let them stay because Jem and Scout saw everything like he stated. Also I like the statement that only Atticus could have made the jury stay out of the courtroom for so long. It shows the Atticus is a decent lawyer. Judge Taylor seemed to be supporting Tom Robinson because he assigned Atticus to defend Tom. It shows that the judge is not impartial to anyone making him a fair judge. Then Aunt Alexandria can be counted on o make Scout mad. Alexandria refuses to let Walter in the house, making Scout mad. There is Aunt Alexandria with her obsession with heritage. Then it is great to see Jem and Scout properly taught manners from Atticus. Also I like the way Atticus described getting a law changed in the state. Does it remind anyone of any other time period? Also Boo Radley is another issue. Jem’s words about him are very interesting. The words show Jem’s greater thinking. Boo Radley does not want to go out of the house and face grim realties of society.


    • May 1st, 2012 at 7:02 pm      Reply carak1 Says:

      I also think it was rather interesting that Atticus let the children return but I think it was a very “Atticus” thing to do. Like you said, he understood that it was something they would see later in life. I think he wanted them to see it in order to learn a lesson when they were young enough to understand how horrible people can be. Atticus said to Alexandra that it (the trial) was as Maycomb as missionary teas.


      • May 1st, 2012 at 7:27 pm      Reply nicolea4 Says:

        I also found it interesting that Atticus allowed Scout and Jem to return to the trial after they ate dinner. I think Scout and Jem learned a lot about how life works by sitting in on the trial, and that things sometimes do not work out as they should.


        • May 1st, 2012 at 9:21 pm      Reply leonl2 Says:

          I agree. Atticus probably knew that if Scout and Jem watched the trial, it might have had an effect on their view of the world.


    • May 1st, 2012 at 9:32 pm      Reply innag2 Says:

      I also agree. I think that Atticus didn’t want them there, because as a father, he wants to shield his children from all the bad things this world has, but when he found out they already heard the trial, he realized that they in some way need to see this. He wants them to grow up and realize the injustices this world has to offer and to try and change them into good things. I think Atticus is an amazing man.


  2. May 1st, 2012 at 6:47 pm      Reply Ben E. Says:

    In these three chapters Jem is given a harsh wake-up into reality. Since the trial Jem has realized that all people can’t get along. He has been woken up to hatred. Although he doesn’t understand why there is hatred, he now believes that is an eminent part of life, and that it can’t be fixed. The last sentence of the chapter, “I think I’m beggining to understand why Boo Radley’s stayed shut up in the house all the time…it’s because he wants to stay inside,” Supports this, and proves that Jem has now entered a depressing reality check. I disagree with Jem. I think that things can always be changed. Atticus tells Scout and Jem that normal people don’t serve on the jury because they are afraid. I believe, and I think Atticus would agree, once those fears were overcome, reforms can be made. Atticus showed no fear in defending Tom Robinson, and is slowly started a reformational process. Although Jem may not realize it, Tom Robinson will be a martyr in the reforms for African-Americans that are starting in this book. For this reason I disagree with Jem.


  3. May 1st, 2012 at 7:12 pm      Reply michaelt10 Says:

    In this section of To Kill a Mockingbird, the trial comes to a close. Despite a great fight put up by Atticus, they jury found Tom Robinson guilty. Even though there was not much evidence that he committed the crime, it looks like the court found him guilty simply because he was black. Sadly, this may be correct. Once again, Tom represents the dog. They shot the dog because he walked funny. They convicted Tom because he was black. I wonder if they had even more evidence in Toms favor, would the jury still vote him guilty. Also, I was struck by the calmness of Atticus about Mr. Ewell. He was almost pleased to have the anger taken out on him, and was doing it in the best views of others.


  4. May 1st, 2012 at 7:25 pm      Reply nicolea4 Says:

    In tonight’s reading, the Tom Robinson trial finally comes to an end. In spite of Atticus doing everything he could to defend the accused, the jury found Tom Robinson guilty. It seemed obvious to the reader that he was an innocent man, which brings up the question of why he was convicted. Tom Robinson was found guilty simply because of his skin color. In a case of a white man against a black man, the white man always wins. After the case was over, Mr. Ewell saw Atticus near the post office and spat in his face. Mr. Ewell also threatened to kill Atticus, and Mr. Ewell called him many terrible names. I was surprised by how calm Atticus was when Mr. Ewell did this to him. All Atticus did was take out his handkerchief to wipe his face. He told Scout and Jem that he was unaffected by it because he would rather get spat in the face by Mr. Ewell than have him take his anger out on his own children.


  5. May 1st, 2012 at 7:35 pm      Reply Jesse Says:

    In tonight’s reading, despite the great case Atticus put togther, the jury still found Tom guilty. Poor Jem has realized that the world isn’t what it seems and that life isn’t fair. In many ways I agree with Jem that some laws at this time had room for improvment and many of those particular laws were changed or improved. How ever life still isn’t going to be perfedtly fair no matter how perfect the laws are. I also like what Jem siad about how Boo Radley never comes out. Jem says it’s because he doesn’t want to, meaning he doesn’t want to face life and society in all of its unfairness. In reality, they live in an unfair world.


    • May 1st, 2012 at 9:08 pm      Reply anjuv1 Says:

      This was sad. I felt bad for Jem and how he felt after finding out what the world is really like.


    • May 1st, 2012 at 9:15 pm      Reply sharonm1 Says:

      I also like what Jem said about Boo Radley, I think that this is another sign of him growing up because he used to believe that Boo never came out because he was an insane man, now he is seeing things more sensibly


  6. May 1st, 2012 at 7:55 pm      Reply johnw2 Says:

    The line that struck me the most was when Atticus said “-seems that only children weep.” What struck me the most about this quote was that it show the innocent and purity of the youth. Jem and Scout were easily able to look past the color Mr. Robinson’s skin, and see that there was no way he did what he was accused of. However the members of the jury were not able to do the same as the children. When they look at Tom all they saw was his skin color, and what he was being accused of. They were unable to remain impartial to Mr. Robinson and they all felt like the African-American is most definitely lying. Even those few adults who believed Tom did not do what he was accused of, still refused to shed a tear. This is because they knew what was going to be the verdict. They knew that no matter how hard Atticus Finch worked, and fought for this man years and years of racism would work against him and cause poor innocent Tom to be accused of doing what he did not do. This is why Atticus says only the children weep, because they are not wise enough yet to see why this happened to Tom. I know when you are a child you are told to act grown up, but maybe just maybe adults should think more like children and look at the case and not the accused.


  7. May 1st, 2012 at 7:56 pm      Reply ashleys2 Says:

    In this section of To Kill a Mockingbird, it seems like Jem has finally grown up. During the trial, he takes care of Scout and Dill by sitting with them and watching out for them. He seems to have developed his own opinions on adult topics, such as racism and the social class structure of Maycomb. After Atticus lost the trial, he was upset because he knew that Tom Robinson was innocent and that the jury voted him guilty only because they were racist. His childhood opinions of fairness in law have been crushed by reality. Also, Jem realizes that his family is on the top of the social structure of Maycomb, and he helps Scout try to come to terms with the fact that although Aunt Alexandra is wrong in calling the Ewells and Cunninghams “white trash”, it is true that all people are not the same, which is what Scout believes. Jem is also starting to go through puberty, which is shown when he shows Scout his first chest hair. He also gets a piece of the adult cake instead of getting a mini cake like Scout and Dill. Jem realizes that the world isn’t fair as he gets older, and maybe he will be the one to change it.


  8. May 1st, 2012 at 7:57 pm      Reply coryannm2 Says:

    In tonight’s reading the case of Tom Robinson vs. Bob Ewell finally came to a close. It saddens me greatly to see an innocent man proclaimed guilty because of his race and see a guilty man get away unscathed. Though, it wasn’t surprising, it is society and society is twisted and wrong in so many different ways, and it is true in the past and present. The chapters tonight really made me think about how horrible society is and how it was horrible when Jem realized it. Jem, after seeing the trial, learned that there is much hatred in the world and it will never change, and I also believe that it will never change, because there will always be people who hate one another for their differences. I find what Jem said about Boo Radley to be quite interesting, maybe he doesn’t come out because he wants to stay inside, away from the atrocities of society. Jem has taken this realization rather hard, knowing that society isn’t perfect as you had once thought is truly a slap in the face from reality, and Jem took it badly. To Kill A Mockingbird really highlights the flaws in society.


  9. May 1st, 2012 at 8:14 pm      Reply sabrinak1 Says:

    In these chapters, I found most interesting was Jem’s visceral reaction to the outcome of Tom Robinson’s trila. He was very upset and even started crying. Children are special in a way that adults don’t understand. Children aren’t rascist, they are taught to be. (Nature vs. Nurture!). Jem does not care that Tom is black, he only sees the evidence and watched the trial. Just based on the evidence and testomonies, Tom Robinson was not guilty of raping Mayella Ewell. The jury however, does not see it that way. They may have seen the truth behind tom’s words but they would have been an extreme minority. The jury from just hearing about the case already had their own opinions in mind no matter what happened during court. Plus, they would be looked down upon for doing the right thing and letting Tom go free. This is really a case of the boy who cried wolf, and sadly, Tom got caught in the middle. I was really sad to see them arrest Tom and even worse, but if this case happened again in present day, I’m not sure oif the outcome would really be different.


  10. May 1st, 2012 at 8:16 pm      Reply bridgetd1 Says:

    In these chapters Atticus finds out that Jem, Scout, and Dill have been in the courtroom the whole time. An ordinary parent would probably make them go home and stay home but Atticus lets them stay. I think he did this because they had already heard most of the case and he thought it would teach them a ‘life lesson.’ Jem learns that not everybody is going to get along and that life is not fair from this case. Tom Robinson was clearly innocent but the jury said he was guilty because he was colored and the Ewells are white. Jem is really upset by this and is in a bad mood for days after that. Another thing found interesting was that many people left gifts for Atticus on the back steps, including the Cunninghams. The Cunninghams probably felt bad about being in the mob and may have even realized Tom Robinson was probably innocent along with many others. Other people may have just wanted to thank Atticus for trying.


  11. May 1st, 2012 at 8:23 pm      Reply Anton Says:

    Due to a bias jury, trials may be unfair. This was matches the situation in this case. Tom Robinson, guilty or not, had had an unfair trial, as well as punishment for the crime which he most likely did not do. Outrageously, the punishment for the raipe (I know how its spelt, but this does not let me post it with that word) he had been convicted of, the one with no good witnesses or evidence, was death. Death was the punishment because Tom Robinson was African-American. The jury was composed of farmers. They not only would take Mr. Ewell’s voice over Tom Robinson’s because Tom Robinson was black, but also because they could relate to Mr. Ewell. Mr. Ewell is poor just like the farmers. He seems to work hard, and the farmers can relate to that. This conviction leads Jem’s realization that the world is not fair always fair. It seems that at this, Atticus’s sister temporarily forgets the “shame” he is bringing to the family. This is a tragic event, but the outcome seemed to have been expected by all except the children, who were caught of guard by the verdict. It really shows here that children have not developed such strong judgmental features.


  12. May 1st, 2012 at 8:27 pm      Reply kevinj3 Says:

    In this part of the story, the long, drawn-out trial finally ends, and we find out about Tom Robinson’s fate. In the beginning, Atticus receives a note from Calpurnia that the children have been missing, and discovers that they have been watching the trial. Scout and Jem go home for a meal, but come back in time to hear the verdict. Sadly enough, the jury unanimously voted Robinson guilty, and Jem, who believed him to be innocent, bursts into tears, saying, “it ain’t right”. Most of us can agree this entire trial was prejudiced and largely based on racial differences. Of course, the white gets the benefit of the doubt, (if there ever was one), and the black suffers.

    A passage that struck me was when Atticus told Jem that one man on the jury wanted an outright acquittal of the defendant, and that it was Mr. Cunningham. I am surprised to hear this because there is an unwritten code that whites must never try to show sympathy or kindness toward blacks, much less in a public event like a trial. He still voted guilty in the end, but we must acknowledge this step as an effort to mend the divides between blacks and whites.

    The Finch family, besides Aunt Alexandra, seem to not be prejudiced. Scout and Jem are still children, so they don’t understand much yet about the importance of skin color, but why does Atticus express no signs of prejudice? He must know that other townspeople, even the entire town, will give him flak for his beliefs. Also, the punishment, death, for the charges against Robinson is quite severe. In modern society, death sentences are only given out in rare cases, definitely not in ones such as these.


  13. May 1st, 2012 at 8:29 pm      Reply carak1 Says:

    These chapters of To Kill a Mockingbird contain so many ideas about morals. It presents many ideas about racism, how people can be utterly atrocious to one another, and how children are actually more ethical than adults. The most interesting part part of the reading was that the mere idea of possibly caring for a black person is preposterous to the white people of Maycomb. Aunt Alexandra repeatedly pushes Atticus to fire Calpurnia. Alexandra seems to believe that Cal is too close to the kids and is raising them incorrectly. She cannot understand Atticus’ attachment to Calpurnia; she cannot fathom that Cal is a member of the Finch family. In a slightly more harmful example of this phenomenon, the main insults directed at Atticus and the Finch family circle around being a “ni**er lover.” The people are too ignorant to see that a “ni**er” is a person too, a person who deserves to be represented, especially in court. Also, Atticus was given the case, he did not request it. Finally, Bob Ewell spits on Atticus and calls him a “ni**er-lovin’ bastard.” Just as parents love to say, people who curse only do so because they are not intelligent enough to come up with something better to say. Bob Ewell is a prime example of this parental proverb. He uses this term because it is the worst insult he could possibly use. That. Is. Pathetic.

    P.S: I hate bleeping out the word used in the book for African-Americans. It just bothers me that it is a problem to use a historically accepted word in its context. However, in order to be politically correct, I changed the word. Please comment on your thoughts about the “n word.”


    • May 1st, 2012 at 8:30 pm      Reply carak1 Says:

      Ooops… that wasn’t meant to be in italics.


    • May 1st, 2012 at 9:11 pm      Reply equinson Says:

      Let’s have this conversation about the importance of the word in class. And guess what! I will be back with you all tomorrow! 🙂


      • May 1st, 2012 at 9:18 pm      Reply leonl2 Says:

        😀 Yaaaay!!!

        And Cara, I think you can use the word without fear of insulting anyone. We all know you aren’t trying to be racist and you aren’t even saying it to somebody as an insult. It’s basically just the text in the book.

        And what do you mean by politically correct?


      • May 1st, 2012 at 9:30 pm      Reply amandaj3 Says:

        YAY! 😀

        I heard over today’s announcements that you guys were done with testing for the ELA. That’s great!

        In reply to Cara’s comment,

        I use that word in my blog post. I don’t think it’s really insulting anyone because you’re just quoting the text in To Kill A Mockingbird. Nothing less than that. But yes it also bothers me too.


  14. May 1st, 2012 at 8:31 pm      Reply alwynp2 Says:

    I found it surprising that Tom Robinson was still considered guilty of the crime. I thought that Atticus would have enough evidence to point the crime to Bob Ewell. I guess the jury is not as racist since it took a long time to make a decision. Also, this might have been in a previous chapter, but I couldn’t believe that Mr. Raymond, who was supposedly drunk most of the time, preferred blacks to whites. He “drank” Cola in a paper sack. Racism is a serious thing in this trial. I was surprised at how coolly Atticus was when Bob Ewell had spat on his face and called him certain words.


  15. May 1st, 2012 at 8:34 pm      Reply briannab3 Says:

    In tonight’s chapters, readers really get a sense of what a unique and genuinely kind person Atticus is. Tom did end up getting charged guilty to the crime, but in the process of defending him, Atticus took away the Ewell’s last shred of credibility, as he called it. Atticus’ questions in cross examination of Mayella really hit home, and as a result, a deep hatred for Atticus was formed in both Mayella and Mr Ewell. Mr Ewell is furious at Atticus for taking away his dignity and practically revealing to the whole town that he beat his won children, and subjected them to filthy and lonely lives. Mr Ewell, who few people respected from the beginning, couldn’t take the punishment without striking back and getting revenge, because his kind of people, as Atticus refers to it, always do. Mr Ewell spit in his face, and proceeded to call him disgusting, rude names and challenging him to fight. When Atticus’ only response was to wipe his face and stand there peacefully, Mr Ewell was only further infuriated. No matter what horrendous things he did, Atticus was a gentleman, and did not subside to trashy ways. He explained to Scout and Jem, who were frightened for his safety, that he was more than glad to take the blame and anger of Mr Ewell, so long as it means one leass painful beating for his children. For Atticus to think of that, and be able to stand a public humiliation is truly admirable, and shows what a gentleman he is. He only thought of the safety of the children, letting his pure character shine through.


  16. May 1st, 2012 at 8:35 pm      Reply shianak3 Says:

    There were a lot of topics throughout these few chapters that were discussion worthy and while reading I got into it a lot. The end of 21 was definitely saddening but not shocking that Tom Robinson was proclaimed guilty. A black man is unlikely to be let free out of a r**e case involving a white woman but even though I knew there was a little to no chance he would be free, I was still angry and upset. Although Atticus was upset, he didn’t take it to heart and he was calm about it, hoping for the best. Another situation I found interesting was the confrontation between Mr. Bob Ewell and Atticus.

    When I read this my heart beat increased substantially. After reading on, I find out that it was just a small threat but not in Jem’s eyes. Mr. Ewell was just angry and flustered and had to take it out on someone and the most reasonable person was Atticus. But, Atticus, being a gentleman kept his composure and simply said,” I wish Bob Ewell wouldn’t chew tobacco,” Jem on the other hand, had different things to worry about and thought considerably about this negatively worrying over a simple thing. Jem was worried Mr. Ewell would do something drastic. While reading this passage, this made me smile because it reminded me that Jem is a typical kid worrying about his old man.


    • May 1st, 2012 at 8:36 pm      Reply shianak3 Says:

      There were a lot of topics throughout these few chapters that were discussion worthy and while reading I got into it a lot. The end of 21 was definitely saddening but not shocking that Tom Robinson was proclaimed guilty. A black man is unlikely to be let free out of a r**e case involving a white woman but even though I knew there was a little to no chance he would be free, I was still angry and upset. Although Atticus was upset, he didn’t take it to heart and he was calm about it, hoping for the best. Another situation I found interesting was the confrontation between Mr. Bob Ewell and Atticus.

      ” this morning Mr. Bob Ewell stopped Atticus on the post office corner, spat in his face, and told him he’d get him if it took the rest of his life.”

      When I read this my heart beat increased substantially. After reading on, I find out that it was just a small threat but not in Jem’s eyes. Mr. Ewell was just angry and flustered and had to take it out on someone and the most reasonable person was Atticus. But, Atticus, being a gentleman kept his composure and simply said,” I wish Bob Ewell wouldn’t chew tobacco,” Jem on the other hand, had different things to worry about and thought considerably about this negatively worrying over a simple thing. Jem was worried Mr. Ewell would do something drastic. While reading this passage, this made me smile because it reminded me that Jem is a typical kid worrying about his old man.


  17. May 1st, 2012 at 8:57 pm      Reply benjaminf Says:

    When reading the three chapter sin To Kill a Mockingbird, I found a few things interesting. First of all I don’t know why it took more than three hours for the jury to decide on their verdict, when Judge Taylor read off the verdict of each member of the jury, it sounded like the verdict guilty was the unanimous decision. If everyone agreed that Tom Robinson was guilty, then why did it take so long for the jury to decide on their final verdict? I also am pretty sure that Atticus was lying to Bob Ewell when he said the reason he did not fight back was because he was too old. I think that he did not fight back for multiple people on top of that, one of these reasons is that he likes to take the high road, he takes the high road a lot when he is talking to Jem when he is explaining how unfair life can be, he could have lashed out because he is obviously sick and tired of how badly white people treat colored folks, but instead Atticus keeps a cool head and teaches Jem a life lesson. Another reason why Atticus did not fight back when Bob Ewell spat in his face is because Atticus does not like fighting or any violence for that matter. This is apparent when he doesn’t let the kids kill mockingbirds and when he was a great shot but did not like showcasing his talent when a gun is put in his hands.
    I do not understand how Atticus can keep a level head in even the most stressful situations and I also do not understand how he can have no reaction to a lot of things and just accept the unfairness of life without complaining.


  18. May 1st, 2012 at 9:03 pm      Reply sharonm1 Says:

    Sadly, in tonight’s reading the readers finds out that Tom Robinson did not win the case due to racism. They felt that because he was African American, he must be lying. It was extremely sad to see an innocent man convicted guilty just because of the color of his skin. After the trial I noticed that Jem seemed to have grown-up quite a bit. He started to form his own opinions on more mature topics like, racism and the society’s structure. His opinions of fairness had been crushed by reality. He started to realize that the world wasn’t always as perfect as he thought.


    • May 1st, 2012 at 9:13 pm      Reply leonl2 Says:

      An innocent person being convicted guilty just doesn’t seem right with me. We our supposed to have a justice system right? Because this is obviously not justice.


  19. May 1st, 2012 at 9:05 pm      Reply anjuv1 Says:

    After reading these chapters, I was left disappointed. I had a feeling that by the end of the case that Tom Robinson would be considered guilty, but I was hoping for the best. The jury probably knew that Tom Robinson wasn’t guilty, but still put the consequences on him. I think they did this for more than one reason. The first being the people who make up the jury are racist and the second thing being that they were scared of the other whites. If they said Mayella was guilty then they could be beaten up for defending a person of color. Throughout the book, racism seems to be a reoccurring theme or major concept. I believe that Tom was only considered guilty due to the color of his skin. There was plenty of evidence that was proof that Tom didn’t sexually abuse Mayella Ewell, but it still ended up with her winning the case. I think racism is quite stupid actually. I don’t see why people have to judge others by the color of their skin: not only by their color, but by a lot of other things. We, as people, seem to judge others before we get to know them. I don’t believe that is right. Everyone should be given a chance.


  20. May 1st, 2012 at 9:07 pm      Reply leonl2 Says:

    My first impression of these chapters was that “life is so unfair”, and my current impression remains unchanged. However, there is some assurance received from all this. Although there were many people who despised African-Americans, there are also some people who do not do so. People like Atticus, Link Deas, Judge Taylor, even the Cunnighams eventually. Atticus reproaches anyone who treats African-Americans poorly. He said that a white man that abuses a black man is the lowest of them all.

    I think the author wants to tell us that ideas and feelings can change as time goes on. We see from Jem and Scout’s reaction that they dislike the outcome of the trial and think it is unfair. This highlights a drastic difference between most adults and the children. Who knows, perhaps Jem one day will become a lawyer that judges without discrimination. People’s feelings towards African-Americans will continuously change from generation to generation until it reaches a stage such as today, a time when most of society no longer discriminates against African-Americans. Sadly, we still aren’t perfect yet.

    Again, in these chapters I found myself thinking that Atticus was a fine man. Bob Ewell spat in his face, and he didn’t do anything about it. Atticus just took it, knowing that it could save Mayella from a few extra beatings. Sometimes its better to let someone take their anger out on you instead of letting it boil and grow inside that person.

    The last sentence in chapter 23: “…it’s because he wants to stay inside”, has me thinking about whether or not Mr. Radley actually tried to keep Boo in the house. Maybe he would have had no problem letting him out, and Boo was the one who decided to keep himself secluded to society. Everything may have just been rumors after all. Still, I don’t understand why he would want to stay inside. Sure, society is unfair and harsh as we have already seen, but that is no reason to spend your life cooped up in a house… I recall Boo was tried at a jury once too. Could that be his reason for seclusion? From Tom Robinson’s case I wouldn’t be surprised.


    • May 1st, 2012 at 9:12 pm      Reply leonl2 Says:

      One more thing I noticed in the reading was Scout and Jem’s discussion about different types of “folks”. Scout believes that there is just one type of people- just “Folks”. Jem says that’s what he believed once too, but if that were so, why does everyone fight and argue and discriminate? I agree with Scout in that everyone should be considered the same people, and we should really try our best to not fight or argue or discriminate because of our differences, because we share one important thing in common- we are are all human.


      • May 1st, 2012 at 10:48 pm      Reply nicholasm14 Says:

        I agree. We are all human and deserved to be treated equally. The color of our skin has nothing to do with our worth as a human being, and we should not be discriminated against because of it. I really wish that we could all see this, but unfortunately even today when things are better compared to the time of the book not everyone views people in this way.


  21. May 1st, 2012 at 9:30 pm      Reply innag2 Says:

    Many things were very interesting in the chapters we read tonight. What caught me as most significant was Jem’s reaction to the hearing. He was utterly distraught with the fact that Tom Robinson was charged guilty on all accounts. He sincerely believed that in now way could he be charged with this gruesome crime, as it was obvious that he had not done anything wrong. I felt awful for Jem. I felt awful because every child experiences something like this. Maybe not in Jem’s way, as with the trial and the awful segregation, but in other ways. Each child has this moment, where he realizes the world is not all it seems. It is not innocent, nor a happy place by any means. They realize that there are cruel, awful people, and there are mean ways of living. They realize that life isn’t fair. At this moment, it seems that the child has just become an adult. No longer naive, and not so innocent, either. They grow up in that moment, and it is a crushing blow. It signifies the end of their childhood, and the start of a life, one that can be so bitter yet to sweet at the same time. It’s shown in the book that Jem does indeed seem to turn into a young man right after the trial. He couldn’t believe it at first, but he saw the injustices that the world has, and he realizes that the world isn’t as nice as he thought it was.


  22. May 1st, 2012 at 9:32 pm      Reply amandaj3 Says:

    In chapters 21, 22, and 23 of To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee, we finally see the conclusion to Tom Robinson’s trial. Although Tom’s lawyer, Atticus Finch, had solid evidence to back them up, the jury ruled against Tom. The jury is really full of prejudice. They totally judged Tom before even hearing his story. Even after they heard his account on the accused crime, they still did not feel sorry for him. In the small Southern town of Maycomb, White people wouldn’t dare to feel sympathetic to an African-American, so it was uncommon if they did. Even if they considered doing it, I’m sure the jury felt scared or worried to actually do it. I really wish they did because I strongly believe that Tom Robinson is innocent. Atticus honestly had solid evidence proving that Tom is purely innocent but the jury refused to declare him innocent. It just irks me that people judge other people for their color, nationality, disability, etc. It’s just racist to think that and I truly wish that people can see how offensive it can be. I’m glad Atticus didn’t give up hope yet. He thinks that there is still a chance at the appealing.

    Another interesting thing I noticed was how mature Jem has become. When he completely took care of Scout really proved that he has matured and finally grown up. I’m glad he has. I’m looking forward to Scout maturing too. That should be interesting.

    Oh and also, I love this book. ♥


    • May 1st, 2012 at 9:33 pm      Reply amandaj3 Says:

      Ugh. I left the italic tag open, so my entire post is left in italics. Please disregard this post.


  23. May 1st, 2012 at 9:34 pm      Reply amandaj3 Says:

    In chapters 21, 22, and 23 of To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee, we finally see the conclusion to Tom Robinson’s trial. Although Tom’s lawyer, Atticus Finch, had solid evidence to back them up, the jury ruled against Tom. The jury is really full of prejudice. They totally judged Tom before even hearing his story. Even after they heard his account on the accused crime, they still did not feel sorry for him. In the small Southern town of Maycomb, White people wouldn’t dare to feel sympathetic to an African-American, so it was uncommon if they did. Even if they considered doing it, I’m sure the jury felt scared or worried to actually do it. I really wish they did because I strongly believe that Tom Robinson is innocent. Atticus honestly had solid evidence proving that Tom is purely innocent but the jury refused to declare him innocent. It just irks me that people judge other people for their color, nationality, disability, etc. It’s just racist to think that and I truly wish that people can see how offensive it can be. I’m glad Atticus didn’t give up hope yet. He thinks that there is still a chance at the appealing.

    Another interesting thing I noticed was how mature Jem has become. When he completely took care of Scout really proved that he has matured and finally grown up. I’m glad he has. I’m looking forward to Scout maturing too. That should be interesting.

    I love this book. ♥


  24. May 1st, 2012 at 9:34 pm      Reply amandaj3 Says:

    Now it’s normal. 🙂


  25. May 1st, 2012 at 9:46 pm      Reply harrisond1 Says:

    Throughout these chapters, we learn the fate of Tom Robinson. Unfortunately, racism towards Robinson got in the way of the trial, and they decided that he was guilty. Due to the ample evidence provided by Atticus, I believe that the jury knows that Robinson probably didn’t commit the crime, but acted purely because of the contempt towards his race. However, not only is he guilty, he has to go through the death penalty as well. This punishment is completely biased towards him as well. The death penalty is very severe, and if a white man had committed the same crime, he would have been imprisoned instead. Even though he was innocent, the prejudice towards Robinson’s race made him lose the case and receive the worst punishment. This court case has especially highlighted the worst parts and flaws of this society. I think throughout the years we have gotten better, but we still have much more to improve on.


    • May 1st, 2012 at 9:57 pm      Reply sarahb5 Says:

      I agree with you on every point you made. It is highly stressed throughout these chapters that the white man will always beat the colored man, even if the white man is the guilty one.


  26. May 1st, 2012 at 9:55 pm      Reply sarahb5 Says:

    I found that the part where Atticus wakes up to a kitchen full of food to be the most moving part of the whole novel so far. It was the morning after the trail and Tom was found guilty. When Atticus woke up in the morning he came out and Calpurnia was cooking chicken for breakfast. When she tells him to come into the kitchen to see what else there was, he was so touched that he actually had tears in his eyes. Calpurnia told him that she found all the food outside and it was from all the colored people, as a way of saying thanks for doing everything he did to help Tom, even though he was still found guilty. I thought this was a very nice thing for them to do, especially since a lot of them are probably really poor and can’t really feed themselves as it is. I also found this to be very sad, and I might be wrong, but it seemed like everyone was kind of giving up. They thanked Atticus for his services and it almost seemed like that was saying “well, you tried your best, but there’s nothing you can do now.” They should have more confidence that Tom will be found innocent in his next trial just as Atticus seems to think that he will be.


  27. May 1st, 2012 at 10:08 pm      Reply lucyl2 Says:

    These chapters really represent the time period that they were set in. Although everyone is supposedly equal during the 1930’s, there is still a fine line between the races in society. Even a man as innocent as Tom Robinson can be convicted because of this division. Something that I am confused about is the jury. In cases now the prosecution and the defense both have a say at who is on the jury and who is not. Why didn’t Atticus use some of his power to pick people for the jury that will be useful to his case?

    I also found it very moving how the people left food at the Finch’s house. This time period is one full of economic struggle for the AVERAGE citizen. Can you imagine how hard it must be for an African American family to get by? They are not only handicapped by the economy, but also their skin color which gives them unfair and unequal treatment anyway. These people most likely have (practically) nothing to give, but they are willing to give it up anyway just to show appreciation to a man fighting for them. It is genuine kindness. You don’t see that in people as much today.


  28. May 1st, 2012 at 10:26 pm      Reply anthonym9 Says:

    I think Jem was a very important character in these chapters. He is almost stuck between grown up and young. He understands a lot, but still doesn’t understand a lot. He tries to act smart by explaining the trial to Scout and standing up for himself, but he really doesn’t understand life in Maycomb. He does know that there are separate kinds of people like the Finches, then the Cunninghams, then the Ewells, and then African-Americans. He definitely tries to act older than he is, but in a way is unable to. He doesn’t have enough life experience because he is still young. Jem still has the sense of being childish in him. He went to the trial, even though it was dangerous.
    I also thought what Atticus explained to Jem was very important. He said that he would have taken being spitted on to save Mayella a beating. This was very kind because he knew that Mr. Ewell only threatened him because he was angry at Atticus being a lawyer against him. Only a very moral person would have said this.


    • May 1st, 2012 at 10:36 pm      Reply Autumn N. Says:

      I agree with what you said about Jem being stuck in between child and young adult and how he still doesn’t fully get everything. I also thought it was important when Atticus explained that he could take being spat on if it would save Mayella from getting beaten.


  29. May 1st, 2012 at 10:34 pm      Reply Autumn N. Says:

    I would like to focus on the last part of chapter 23 when Jem and Scout were discussing the different types of people. Jem thought that in Maycomb County, there were 4 types of people. Normal people, people like the Cunninghams, people like the Ewells, and people like the African-Americans. Jem comes up with this in order to account for why everyone just can’t get along because we are all the same but Scout thinks that there is just one type of people. Scout still believes that we are all the same; all equal and our hatred towards each other is just a mystery. Scout doesn’t label people the way Aunt Alexandra and the other people in their town do. Last night I talked about Dill’s sensitivity and how it showed that he was still innocent. The last few pages of chapter 23 reflected Scout’s innocence. She doesn’t get what is wrong with hanging out with the Cunninghams, she doesn’t get why there are so many social barriers in Maycomb. Jem is growing older, physically and mentally. He is beginning to get it. The way that Scout and Dill think should be the way that everyone thinks. It shouldn’t matter what race or social class you are classified as but instead you should be judged on your character. However after a certain age, society gets to you and even if you don’t fully accept it yourself, most people go along with the general opinion of everyone else. I hope that Scout’s stubborn nature stays with her and that she doesn’t give in to Aunt Alexandra and everyone else but rather, keeps fighting and continues to see the good in everyone and judge them for the reasons that people ought to be; their actions.


  30. May 1st, 2012 at 10:43 pm      Reply nicholasm14 Says:

    In tonight’s reading the Tom Robinson case finally drew to a close in an undesired but expected way. Tom Robinson was convicted even though Atticus gave plenty of evidence that Tom did not try to r-a-p-e Mayella. The truth is plain and simple, Tom Robinson was found guilty because he was black and there was so much racism against blacks at the time. A black man’s word being chosen over a white man’s word was unheard of at the time, and while we all hate it and find it to be unfair, this was a fact at the time. The most interesting thing that happened was that when the jury went to vote on whether Tom Robinson was guilty or innocent, it took almost three hours. When the jury’s decision that Tom Robinson was guilty was unanimous, how could it have taken so long? It was because they were all probably thinking that Tom Robinson was actually innocent, but since society was so racist against blacks they decided that Tom was guilty. It was probably for this reason alone and also because if anyone voted that Tom was innocent, they would have to face the other whites who would probably do what that mob tried to do to Atticus because he supported a black man over a white man.

    Atticus continues to show how great of a person he is when Bob Ewell spat in his face and threatened to kill him and he didn’t anything but wipe his face and walk away. Atticus knew that if he let Mr. Ewell let out his anger on him then all that rage wouldn’t go to Mr. Ewell’s children and he would save them from a few beatings. He kept a level head and his only comment was that he wished that Bob Ewell didn’t chew tobacco.

    The last thing I would like to talk was what Jem said at the end of the reading about Boo Radley. He said that maybe Boo Radley stayed in his house for all of these years because he wanted to. Jem was talking about how Boo probably saw how ugly, harsh, and unfair the world was when he was on trial, and how Boo probably just decided that he didn’t want to be a part of such a cruel world. This is yet another theory about Boo Radley, but I can’t wait until we learn the actual truth about him.


  31. May 1st, 2012 at 11:03 pm      Reply amandaf2 Says:

    In this section of To Kill a Mockingbird, Tom Robinson’s trial ends. Even though Atticus did a fantastic job putting together the case, the jury finds Tom guilty. Atticus proved that Tom was innocent, and there was never any real evidence that it was Tom that committed the crime. It is a shame that Tom was blamed for a crime that he did not commit just because of his skin color. This case explains the harsh reality of the society in Maycomb. I felt bad for Jem because he was so devastated at the outcome of the trial. He was really upset that the world could be so unfair. Jem did not even think about the fact that tom was African American. He listened to the evidence, and thought that there was no way that Tom would be considered guilty. However, the jury is racist, and probably decided that he was guilty before even hearing his side of the story, just because of his skin color. It is a shame that Jem had to learn how unfair and judgmental people are at such a young age.


  32. May 1st, 2012 at 11:13 pm      Reply nikital Says:

    One matter that struck me interesting in tonight’s reading was Jem’s first encounter with reality. From when he was a small boy, he had always believed that Maycomb’s inhabitants were the finest in the world. His universe was righteous and logical, fair and lovely, placid and perfect. Everyone knew his or her duty, and would act upon it without hesitation if called to do so. This, Jem soon discovered, was far from the actual truth. Idleness, indifference, and racism actually obscured the views of those around him. Even if it were known that a matter was morally wrong, many would still vote in favor of it, since this is what had always been, and should continue to be. Maycomb’s society was definitely different from what Jem had originally perceived, and he discovered this in Tom Robinson’s trial. “How could they?” he asked Atticus after the trial. Robinson was an innocent man, all of the evidence pointed towards it. So why did the jury convict him? Was it because they considered him beneath the status of a man? Did they truly believe that things would never change, and that they were not changing at that very moment? Or was it something else, a grudge against his race, nurtured from the birth of these men? Perhaps it was all of these, maybe none of them. In any case, by the end of the trial, Jem had realized that his world was not the place he once though it was, but a harsh, cruel, and unfair place where hopes and dreams are crushed and humans never get along together.


  33. May 1st, 2012 at 11:17 pm      Reply tylerf2 Says:

    During the readong of tonight’s chapters, the trial of Tob Robinson finally comes to an end. Despite all the explaination given by Atticus in proving that Tom was in fact innocent, they find him guilty of the crimes. I believe that it is obvious to everyone that Tob did not commit the crime, and that Atticus had done his job extremely well in proving Tom innocent. However, I believe the decision was made more based on general information of a colored man than on the evidence and explaination put forth. I believe that the jury simply did not trust Tom becuase he was black, and therefore sided with the Ewell family and made Tom guilty.

    I personally believe that this is extremely wrong of a jury to do so, for you cannot judge a case with a biased opinion, for that would make you corrupt. That is what the jury was: corrupt. Even though Atticus performed extremely well and proved to everyone that Tom was innocent of all accusations, they still chose to find him guilty, simply because of his skin color (Blacks were not trusted and were considered to be lesser beings than whites at that time). The jury was corrupt in their decision, and it is a discrace to the court system, for if the evidence shows that the man is innocent, than he must be found innocent. But you cannot find a man guilty if he was hthe one who did not commit the crime, and the defendant’s lawyer (Atticus) did all he could possibly do and proved Tom innocent. It makes no sense. Why punish someone for something that you know they did not do?


  34. May 2nd, 2012 at 11:48 am      Reply carlya1 Says:

    I was really touched by the part in these chapter when Atticus walked into the kitchen to find bounty of food. Cal was in the kitchen cooking and told him to walk into the kitchen to see what else there was. when Atticus saw the food, he nearly fainted. There was so much food, the table was full. Al explained that all the colored people brought the food to say thanks for his help in tryin to save Tom Robinson from a life in jail. Atticus lost in court on this particular case but there was no one else that would help the colored so they did this in appreciation. This meant a lot to Atticus because it showed that he was appreciated by the people he was trying to help.


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