Ms. Quinson's 2011-2012 9H Blog

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If we shadows have offended….

January18

If we shadows have offended,
Think but this, and all is mended,
That you have but slumber’d here
While these visions did appear.
And this weak and idle theme,
No more yielding but a dream,
Gentles, do not reprehend:
if you pardon, we will mend:
And, as I am an honest Puck,
If we have unearned luck
Now to ‘scape the serpent’s tongue,
We will make amends ere long;
Else the Puck a liar call;
So, good night unto you all.
Give me your hands, if we be friends,
And Robin shall restore amends.

First, paraphrase Puck’s final speech. Second, analyze: So!  Now! Who is really dreaming? What is Shakespeare saying about theater, reality, magic, dreaming….  Make sure you include many text-based details and that you respond to at least one other comment in this thread.

65 Comments to

“If we shadows have offended….”

  1. January 18th, 2012 at 6:40 pm      Reply nikital Says:

    At the very end of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Puck, or Robin Goodfellow, speaks directly to the audience: (paraphrased)

    If we, the actors, have offended or angered you, think this and all will be well and merry: that you but have slept here, while the actual play unfolded, and this whole play was nothing more than a dream. Ladies and gentlemen, do not rebuke us, for if you forgive our performance, we will fix whatever offended or angered you. I am being completely honest with you, and if we have gotten undeserved luck, to escape your hisses, we will make amends to the play soon, for if we don’t you may call me a liar. So, good night to you all and applaud if we be friends. I shall make amends.

    In this final speech of his, Puck reveals who is really dreaming in this play: the watcher of the play him/herself! At least, he suggests it. The reader/watcher never quite knows for sure. I believe that Shakespeare meant for the borders of dream and reality to be this obscure. His point might very well be that we have no true definition for real and unreal, dream and reality, and that, even today, human beings do not have a complete understanding of the world and forces around us. For example, how do we know that we aren’t living in a dream (or illusion, call it what you will) right now? We’ve still got no evidence, and that’s the point, though it was directed to the people of that time period. Shakespeare messes with our minds, but what if they were already tampered with in the first place?


    • January 18th, 2012 at 6:43 pm      Reply nikital Says:

      I just looked over what I wrote, and I guess I can accurately say that the directors of The Matrix also did what Shakespeare did, tampering with our understanding of dreams and reality and making us doubt what we already know.


      • January 18th, 2012 at 10:57 pm      Reply equinson Says:

        Nice connection!


      • January 18th, 2012 at 11:32 pm      Reply nicholasm14 Says:

        I never really thought about The Matrix while writing about this. Now when I think about it, The Matrix really did do what Shakespeare did. I mainly thought about Inception like most of the other people did.


    • January 18th, 2012 at 9:56 pm      Reply briannab3 Says:

      wow your paraphrasing is amazing!


  2. January 18th, 2012 at 7:12 pm      Reply ashleys2 Says:

    If we the actors have offended or angered you in any way, think this and everything will be fine. Think that while this play was going on while you were sleeping, and that everything you experienced on this stage was all a dream. Ladies and gentlemen, do not be angry with us for anything that happened during our performance, for we will try our best to improve upon the problems. I am an honest puck, so you can take my word for it, and if I don’t you will keep hissing at me and call me a liar. So good night to everyone and applaud if you liked the show. I will make amends.

    In this speech said by Puck at the end of the last act, he reveals to the audience that the whole show was a dream that the audience was dreaming, so really, the characters’ actions were a dream to them, and their dreams are also dreams to us! Shakespeare provides audiences everywhere with some food for thought: What if we are really dreaming right now, and what is the difference between our dreams and realities? Shakespeare is trying to make us think what in life is real and what isn’t, and their is no proof to clarify our theories. Not even scientists know the answer! So really, maybe this day is just a dream of ours, or maybe someone else’s! These answers we may never know for a fact, but it an interesting thing to think about.


    • January 18th, 2012 at 7:56 pm      Reply lucyl2 Says:

      The play is reminding me so much of inception right now. :O


      • January 18th, 2012 at 8:02 pm      Reply Autumn Says:

        I agree it has so many similarites to Inception with the dreams and everything. Not just the dream within a dream or the play within a play but even at the end when you weren’t sure if they were still in the dream or not, at the end of this play you’re not really sure if they were dreaming the whole time or what!


  3. January 18th, 2012 at 7:44 pm      Reply shianak3 Says:

    This is Puck’s speech in the end of Act 5 paraphrased;

    If we actors have offended you in any way
    You will happy knowing this;
    All that happened here in your memory
    All the visions are all just a dream
    Ladies and Gents, do not scorn us
    If you forgive us for our mistakes we will fix them
    For I am an honest Puck
    If we have been given the chance of luck,
    To escape your cursing hisses
    We will make changes
    If not you may call me a liar
    So Good Night!
    Applaud if you enjoyed
    And I, Robin will make amends

    This is the last speech in the book made by Puck. He is saying that this whole story, A Midsummer Night’s Dream was a dream! Puck suggests that this whole play was just our dream or someone else’s dream we were envisioning. Shakespeare is trying to make us question whether we are in reality or just in a crazy dream. I think Shakespeare is trying to say that life is just a dream and once it’s over you leave to sleep’s half brother death. Shakespeare is also trying to convey that plays and the theater is all just a vision that is to crazy to be real.


  4. January 18th, 2012 at 7:55 pm      Reply lucyl2 Says:

    If us actors have offended you tonight, think this and you will no longer feel that way. That you have slept here, and imagined what you’ve just seen. And what you’ve seen is nothing but a dream. My audience, do not be angry, we will fix the errors that we have made, and I, Puck, honestly can promise that if you quit calling me a liar. So good night, and if we are friends, applaud, and I shall fix our play.

    In his speech, Puck(/Robin Goodfellow) tells the audience how the play that they’d just watched was all a dream. During this play, I think that Shakespeare is trying to send the message that sometimes it’s difficult to comprehend the difference between our dreams and reality. It’s one of those mysteries that we can’t describe. Have you ever had a dream that seemed like real life? Maybe it was. Maybe our lives are our dreams, and our dreams are our realities. It’s confusing, I know, but work with me here and use your imagination. Now that we’ve finished the play it reminds me of a Dr. Seuss quote. He said “You know you’re in love when you can’t fall asleep because reality is finally better than your dreams.” It’s my favorite quote, and it fits because this play had the themes of both love and dreams.


  5. January 18th, 2012 at 7:58 pm      Reply Autumn Says:

    If we actors have offended you in any way, Think about what I am saying and everything will be okay, You have slept here while these dreams have appeared. This awful play was nothing more than a dream. Gentleman, do not get angry, if you forgive us, we will fix our problems: I, Puck, am telling you the truth. Now, in order to excape your criticisms and hissing, we will make ammends before long, and if we don’t, you may call me a liar. So, good night all of you. Take my hand so that we are friends, and Robin (myself) shall make amends.

    Puck’s final speech is confusing. It tests our belief about dreams and reality. The play seemed to take place in reality rather than a dream state but then Puck says everything was a dream, addressing the whole audience. We don’t know if it was all a dream, after all there were fairies! I think that Shakespeare is trying to say that sometimes everything can seem like a dream and it’s easy to get reality and dream state confused. It makes me think of how sometimes you can think back on something that happened and you’re not really sure if it happened in real life or if it happened in a dream. Also I think Shakespeare was connecting this speech with the one about how poets can look from heaven to earth and back again and they can make a world out of nothing, that comes to the theatre.


  6. January 18th, 2012 at 7:59 pm      Reply anjuv1 Says:

    This is Puck’s final speech in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, paraphrased:

    If we actors have angered any of you,
    think this and everything will be okay.
    You have fallen asleep here
    while this play, these visions, appeared to you as a dream.
    Ladies and gentlemen, do not get angered by us,
    for if you forgive our performance, we will try our hardest to fix anything that went wrong.
    For I, Puck, am truly honest
    and if we got any bad luck, to escape your hisses
    we will make improvements to the play soon,
    or then you will call me a liar
    so, good night to you all.
    Give our performance applause, if we are friends.
    I, Puck shall make amends.

    A Midsummer Night’s Dream ends in this speech. Puck or Robin is saying how this whole play was just a dream and everyone was sleeping. Shakespeare is trying to tell us, the readers, that reality and fantasies (like dreams) are so hard to tell apart. One person may believe they are living in reality when they are really in a dream. He is showing us how these two worlds are combined in a way that is very confusing, yet interesting. Shakespeare is trying to prove is that one person can’t tell the difference between fantasy and reality. This theory is very confusing, but really gets you thinking about whether or not we are living in reality or just in a dream.


    • January 18th, 2012 at 9:51 pm      Reply sharonm1 Says:

      I agree, Shakespeare is trying to tell the audience that reality and dreams can be difficult to tell apart.


    • January 18th, 2012 at 10:14 pm      Reply kevinj3 Says:

      I definitely agree that this entire play had me thinking at many parts if it was real, or just happening inside of one complicated dream.


  7. January 18th, 2012 at 8:08 pm      Reply benjaminf Says:

    At the end of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Puck addresses to the audience this message:
    If you have taken offense to us actors,
    Think of this and you will no longer be offended,
    You guys have slept next to this stage
    And this play has appeared in your head.
    And this weak, lazy theme,
    Was just a dream,
    But audience, don’t be angry with us:
    If you listen, we will make you change your mind:
    And as I, Puck am an honest man,
    If we unexpectedly received luck
    Now to escape the snake’s tongue,
    We will make amends here and now,
    Or else call me a liar;
    So good night to you all.
    Give me your hands if we are friends,
    And I shall restore amends.
    Puck says that although the actors were said to be dreaming for much of the play, Puck says that the audience was dreaming the whole play anyway. By having Puck say this, Shakespeare is saying that the theater might as well be a dream because everyone knows it’s fiction in the first play. Shakespeare says that you can never be sure what is reality and what is a dream and that magic doesn’t exist because it only happens in dream which aren’t real.


  8. January 18th, 2012 at 8:20 pm      Reply bridgetd1 Says:

    In this speech Puck is saying that if the actors in A Midsummer Night’s Dream have offended the audience, the audience should just believe that they slept through the actual play and dreamt the other. He tells them not to be angry with anything they have done in the play and if the crowd forgives them for their mistakes, they will fix them. Puck tells the audience that he is honest and they can take his word for it and in order to escape the disapproval and hissing, the actors will make amends before long, because if they don’t, the crowd might call him a liar. The he says good night, and tells anyone who enjoyed the paly to applaud and then he will make amends.

    I think that Shakespeare is trying to tell us that reality and dreams are very hard to tell apart. It is like when you are in a dream you believe that everything is real until you wake up and think that the whole thing was ridiculous. This ending makes it confusing as to whether or not the play was real. The whole thing could have been real or the actors could have dreamt the whole thing. Shakespeare is trying to get us to question whether we are actual living our lives or just dreaming them.


  9. January 18th, 2012 at 8:32 pm      Reply nicolea4 Says:

    At the very end of the play, Puck’s final speech leaves the audience mystified:

    If we, the actors have angered you,
    Think about this, and all will be fixed
    That you have slept here
    While this play appeared to you as a dream.
    Ladies and gentlemen, do not rebuke:
    If you forgive us, we will fix:
    And, I, Puck am telling the truth
    Now to avoid your hissing,
    We will make apologies soon;
    Or you can call me, Puck, a liar
    So, good night to you all.
    Give our performance applause, if we are friends,
    And I will make amends.

    In this last speech of A Midsummer Night’s dream, the whole play came together. Shakespeare is saying that theater, reality, magic, and dreaming are all one. He is saying that the whole play may have been a dream and the audience has no way of knowing. Puck’s last speech leaves the audience questioning what they thought was true, and also questioning the difference between dreams and reality. I think that was Shakespeare’s goal in writing this play; people can become confused about the difference between fantasy and reality. Although this theory is very baffling, it makes us question what events in our lives we have dreamt, and if we are dreaming right now.


  10. January 18th, 2012 at 8:41 pm      Reply amandaj3 Says:

    This is how I paraphrased Puck’s speech at the end of Act 5, Scene 1:

    If us, performers, angered you
    All changed have been amended.
    Just listen and everything will be alright.
    You have slept right here
    While these dreams appeared.
    And this silly story
    Was nothing but a dream.
    Gentleman, do not get upset.
    If you just forgive us,
    Everything will be alright.
    I am the honest and trustworthy Puck.
    If we’re lucky not to get yelled at,
    We will be sure to make it up to you soon.
    If not, call me a liar.
    Have a Good night everyone.
    If we’re friends, then give me some applause.
    And I, Robin, shall make amends.

    In this scene, Puck a.k.a Robin Goodfellow basically calls the whole entire play a dream. He is speaking directly to the audience. This is the final scene in Midsummer Night’s Dream. It is kind of confusing because it is challenging our beliefs on dreams and reality. At first the play felt like reality but as it went on it felt like a dream in some parts. Especially when Bottom’s head turned into an ass and when the fairies came in. I think the movie kind of helped put everything together. I think Shakespeare decided to include this scene because I think he wanted the ending to convey a message that basically states that sometimes reality might appear to be a dream. In this play, you couldn’t really tell if it was a fantasy or not. Overall, I liked Midsummer Night’s Dream. 🙂


  11. January 18th, 2012 at 8:46 pm      Reply tylerf2 Says:

    Puck gave an interesting speech at the conclusion of Act V and the entire play of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Apparently, he is adressing the people in the audience, but in a way that he is adressing the people who were watching the play inside the play, almost like the movie Inception, which includes dreams inside dreams. Here is Puck’s speech at the end paraphrased:

    “If us actors have offended any of you,
    Please listen and you shall forgive us.
    That you have been sleeping here
    While these visions have come to you.
    And this entire play
    Was nothing but a mere dream
    Gentle people, do not be upset
    If you forgive, all shall be well.
    I am an honest Puck and speak the truth
    When I say we had a lot of unearned luck.
    Now, to eacape the snake’s tongue
    We shall make amends right here and now.
    Or else call me a liar
    Then good night to you all.
    Give me your hands if we are friends
    And I shall restore amends.”

    Basically what Puck is saying is that even thought the actors of the play were dreaming for most of the play, the audience of the actual play was dreaming as well. By having Puck say this, Shakespeare is saying that the whole thing might as well be a dream since everything was fiction so it could not happen in real life anyway. This reminds me of the movie Inception, wherew they use the same concept of having a dream inside another dream.


  12. January 18th, 2012 at 8:52 pm      Reply alwynp2 Says:

    Here is my paraphrased version of Puck’s speech:
    If we actors have offended you,
    Think this and everything is going to be all right,
    Everything you saw here is not real
    Everything was a dream.
    Ladies and gentlemen, please don’t disrespect us,
    If you forgive us, we will fix things
    I am an honest Puck
    If we have unjust luck,
    To try and get away from your hisses
    And will try and make some changes.
    If this happens, you can call me a liar;
    So, good night, everyone!
    If you enjoyed it, you are more than welcome to give us a round of your applause.
    And I will make amends
    This is what A Midsummer Night’s Dream ended with. Puck is telling us, the readers, that it was all one crazy dream! Shakespeare is trying to tell us that it is hard to distinguish the difference between reality and a dream. There are some dreams that seem so realistic that you actually believe that it is reality until your alarm clock wakes you up. It feels like Inception, where the only way you know that you are in a dream is with a spinning top or something. If anyone saw the ending of Inception, the main character Dom wakes up believing that he is going back to his family in America. However, when he tries to spin his top to test whether or not it is a dream. The final picture is of the top wobbling a little bit, then still spinning.


    • January 18th, 2012 at 11:35 pm      Reply leonl2 Says:

      No actually, getting woken up by an alarm clock might be part of the dream. One could easily have a dream where they get woken up by an alarm clock and start their daily morning routine in their dream until they wake up for real.

      Nice connection!


  13. January 18th, 2012 at 9:07 pm      Reply johnk4 Says:

    If this play has hurt you in some way think about this idea I am about to present to the audience because it will make everything okay. When you heard this play it was nothing but a dream. He says that this will fix everything or else call Puck a liar. He says accept this idea and he will fix everything. He says that the play should not affect the audience too much because it is a dream. This is shown when Puck says, “And this weak and idle theme, no more yielding then a dream. This passage is saying that the audience is dreaming and was sleeping. Shakespeare is saying that the theater is just a way to spread dreams, and reality can be magic if you twist it.


  14. January 18th, 2012 at 9:10 pm      Reply coryannm2 Says:

    If us actors have offended you, think this and all is well, that you have slept here. While you did see these visions. All these visions are only a dream, the offspring of an idle brain. No more significance than a dream, if you excuse us we shall mend, Gentle people if you will pardon us we shall mend, and as I am a truthful Puck, if we have dishonest luck now to escape the serpent’s language. We will make amends here or else call the Puck a liar. So, good night to all. Give me your applause if we be on good terms and Robin make amends.

    Puck’s last statement was rather confusing, but all he is saying is that what the audience just saw had been merely a dream. He says not to reacts to what they had seen because it held no substance, it was just a figment of imagination. Nothing, but the idle wanderings of a dormant brain.


  15. January 18th, 2012 at 9:46 pm      Reply sharonm1 Says:

    If us actors have offended you,
    Think this and everything will be okay,
    You fell asleep and this play was just a dream,
    This weak, idle theme is no more than a yielding dream.
    Ladies and Gentlemen, do not rebuke us
    if you pardon, we will mend
    I am an honest Puck
    And if we got any bad luck,
    To escape your hisses
, we will make improvements soon,
    
Or then you will call me a liar

    Good night to you all. 

    Give applause, if we are friends,
    And 
I, Robin will make amends.

    Through this speech Puck is revealing to the audience that the whole play was a dream. He apologizes for any offence that the audience may have perceived and asks the audience to pardon him. He promises to make up to them by coming up with something better. I think through this speech, Shakespeare is conveying the message that it is sometimes difficult to grasp the differences between dreams and reality. In fact it is quite easy to get the two confused. You can never be sure what is reality and what is a dream. This is yet another way that Shakespeare engages the audience to think.


  16. January 18th, 2012 at 9:52 pm      Reply Jesse Says:

    If we have offended you the think all that you have seen a dream. This whole play was a dream, the doing of the subconsious mind. If you pardon us we shall mend and I am a truthful Puck. We shall make amends or I am a lying Puck. Goodnight and aplaude if we are on good terms and I, Robin, have made amends.

    Puck is trying to convince the audience that the whole play was nothing but a dream that they were imagineing it the enitre time. I love how even though he brakes the forth wall, he remains in character.


  17. January 18th, 2012 at 10:04 pm      Reply johnw2 Says:

    In the end of A Midsummer Night’s Dream Puck has a very interesting speech. His speech basically said that if the actors and play have offend think of this as a strange dream with unusual twists and changes. Also if you think about it as a dream all will be appeased. According to this speech it was not the actors who were having the fantasy it was the audience whom was having the dream, and imagining the entire play. This concept of that we are never really awake is similar to the concept of the Matrix. In the Matrix no one is ever awake they are simply living in a computer simulated world run by machines. In essence it is the same here except without the technology. Also like the Matrix I feel that this play is supposed to make us question what truly is real and what a fantasy is. Are we truly awake or are we asleep and just imagining it all. This question is one that we may never find the answer to or we may not want to find out, after all ignorance is bliss. Over all I feel that A Midsummer Night’s Dream was a very good and thought provoking tale by the mighty poet William Shakespeare.


  18. January 18th, 2012 at 10:05 pm      Reply harrisond1 Says:

    Puck made a speech at the end of the play that was directed towards the audience. Paraphrased, he said:

    If we actors have offended you,
    Listen to what I have to tell you, and you will be all right.
    Believe that you have been sleeping
    While these events have occurred.
    These visions have only been a dream.
    Everybody, please forgive us, we will fix this.
    As I am an honest Puck,
    If we have undeserved luck,
    We shall escape the snake’s tongue,
    And make amends before long.
    If I fail, call me a liar.
    Good night everybody,
    And if you enjoyed this, give some applause,
    And I shall make amends.

    Through this speech, Puck told the audience that the whole play was not real, it was a dream instead. The audience was sleeping and dreaming the scenario the whole time. Shakespeare’s main message through this was that it is difficult to tell the difference between dreams and reality. This can be compared to Inception, where you don’t know whether you are in a dream unless the spinning top falls or not. Also, the concept of a dream inside a dream is here as well. Inception seems to take some cues from A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Shakespeare is trying to get us to question dreams and reality.


    • January 18th, 2012 at 11:37 pm      Reply leonl2 Says:

      I have never watched Inception, so sadly I can’t make these connections. I guess the more you experience the more connections you can make. (ex: mythology 🙂 )


  19. January 18th, 2012 at 10:08 pm      Reply briannab3 Says:

    f we actors have offended you, just think of it this way and everything will be all right—you were asleep when you saw these visions, and this whole play was no more real than a dream. Ladies and gentlemen, don’t get upset with me. If you forgive us, we’ll make everything all right. I’m an honest Puck, and if we are lucky enough to escape your unhappy hissing, we will make it up to you before long. Good night everyone! If we are friends, please give us some applause and I, Robin will make everything up to you.

    Robin is revealing tot he audience that they play they just say was all a dream! He says if anything had offended them, he would make it all better. Shakespeare is conveying a message that there is a thin line between dreams and reality. Sometimes they mix into one another, and then you don’t know what is what. The ending really makes you think and kind of gets confusing in your head. Since Puck broke the fourth wall, was he really telling Shakespeare’s audience that everything they just watched was a dream? Or if you go even deeper, is he saying that life is dream and we could be dreaming right now, away from reality? I think it is a personal choice to make and that Shakespeare was trying to make us question our lives and think way outside the box… or outside of reality.


  20. January 18th, 2012 at 10:08 pm      Reply sarahb5 Says:

    Puck is saying:
    If we actors have made you upset,
    Then what we say now will make it all better:
    You have fallen asleep here,
    While this play was going on.
    And this boring play,
    Made everyone fall asleep,
    People, do not disapprove.
    If you forgive us, we will fix this.
    And I, Puck, am honest,
    That we have gotten lucky
    To escape the audiences booing,
    We will make things better.
    If we don’t, then you can call me, Puck, a liar.
    So goodnight everyone.
    Applaud, if we are friends.
    And Robin shall make things better.

    In Puck’s final speech he is saying that while the this play was going on, everyone fell asleep. That means that not only was it a dream, but it was a dream inside of another dream because everyone that was actually in the play was dreaming so when they woke up, they were still in the audiences dream. Shakespeare is saing that it’s hard to tell who is dreaming because you don’t know if you yourself are dreaming. He is saying that nothing is real unless you want it to be.


  21. January 18th, 2012 at 10:10 pm      Reply kevinj3 Says:

    Puck’s speech was about how the play has been entirely in a dream and the events that have happened were just imagined! Paraphrased, he says that if the actors have offended or hurt you, then listen to these words and all will be better. While sleeping, this play unfolded in someone’s head as a complex dream. Do not scowl at us, for we will fix whatever we have done wrong. I am a trustworthy soul, and I will take whatever blame you give if I do not fulfill expectations. Show me a round of applause if you have enjoyed yourself, I will continue to try to better the experience. Puck seems like he is sorry for the play not being on par with the audience’s wishes. He feels like he can improve on his efforts and will try to if not succeed. Shakespeare’s motives for writing this is to prove that theater can take many forms, even as a dream! Also, dreaming can appear as a reality with the extreme details that a dream can include. Shakespeare conveys that magic is a powerful force, is definitely real in this play, and can affect the actions of people, evident through the magical nectar and how it changes thoughts of people about love. To me, Puck takes on the role of an announcer in this excerpt because of his grand tone and choice of words. Puck is announcing it at the end of the play to let the audience know how he will try to fix what left them unsatisfied. The main theme of this speech is how dreams can be very similar to reality, and that this whole play has been inside a dream.


  22. January 18th, 2012 at 10:16 pm      Reply elizabethp4 Says:

    If we, actors, have offended you,
    Think this, and it’s okay:
    You just slept here,
    While these visions came.
    And this ridiculous story line,
    No more interesting or important than a dream,
    Gentlemen and women, do not hate:
    If you apologize, we will fix it:
    And, since I am an honest Puck,
    If we have luck we didn’t deserve
    To now escape the booing of the crowd,
    We will apologize before long,
    Or else you can call me a liar;
    So good night,
    And give me your hands in an offering of friendship,
    And I, Robin, will make everything right.

    Puck is saying that he’s sorry if anything in the whole play has offended any part of the audience. But then, he makes it a bit more confusing: he says that it doesn’t matter if it did, anyway, because the whole play was a dream. So it was a dream – Lysander, Hermia, Helena, Demetrius, and Bottom’s – within a dream – the audience’s. It isn’t the characters inside the play who dreamed, but the audience. Shakespeare is being satirical, or even sarcastic, about theater and poetry, since he himself is a poet. He’s always saying that reality is just a figment of imagination; he’s saying that reality isn’t real, it’s just how people perceive it.

    Shakespeare is saying how reality, theater, poetry, magic, and dreaming are all parts of one’s figment of imagination, and it’s affected by how a person sees it.


  23. January 18th, 2012 at 10:18 pm      Reply sabrinak1 Says:

    If we as actors have made you upset or offended the audience in any way, listen carefully to what I am saying and you will change your mind. You have watched these dreams being dreamt. This show is an illusion, it is but a dream. Do not get mad, for I am telling the truth! Do not criticize our show for I will soon explain everything and make it all better. So, good night to you all. Give me a round of applause for I am Robin Goodfellow, your friend.
    Puck is very confusing in his last speech. He makes comments about the illusions of dreams, love, fairies, and midsummer night magic. The point he tries to make is that the audience has been let into a secret. The whole play was just a dream and was not real. This is very different from the rest of the play where the fairies were real and everything existed and was how it would be in real life. He gives an interesting insight into the world of Shakespeare. Even though he says that nothing happened and the fairies and creatures do not exist, he himself is a fairy so disproves his own point! I just found that very interesting. This speech is almost like another version of Inception so was very fun the read and analyze.


  24. January 18th, 2012 at 10:18 pm      Reply anthonym9 Says:

    If our actors have offended you
    Think this and you will be fine.
    You have slept in this theatre
    Where you dreamt all these crazy things
    And this play
    Was no more than a dream
    Ladies and gentlemen please do not dissaprove of us
    If you pardon, we will mend
    I am an honest Puck
    And if we had any bad luck
    We will make changes to avoid disapproval
    Or else call me a liar
    Good night to all
    And clap if we are friends
    And I Robin will make amends.

    Puck is now telling us that this play was all our dream. He was saying that none of this actually happened so don’t get mad at us if you didn’t like it. Puck is saying that we were the ones dreaming. Shakespeare also says that all writers and actors do is imagine a play on anything and uses their imagination to create it.


  25. January 18th, 2012 at 10:20 pm      Reply Ben E. Says:

    If we the fairies have confused you, or caused some harm, think about this and you will realize, that you were sleeping, and this was all a dream. This did exist, but the lesson is no more of value than a dream. Don’t be upset with us, if you forgive us we will show why. I am the honest fairy Puck, and we have luck to do anything. If you don’t believe me call me a liar. Goodnight, and join me if you believe me, and I shall restore amends.

    Puck tells us that this Midsummer Night’s Dream is actually fake, it’s a dream. He says the audience is dreaming. Shakespeare puts a very philosophical twist on the play. He makes the point that reality might be dreams, and vice versa. We don’t know which is which. We also don’t know, could there be some higher force tampering with us? And who knows, maybe the lunatics who say they have met ghosts or fairies actually have? Then we would be the lunatics for not believing them. Shakespeare is trying to get the audience to think, which in a sense is breaking the forth wall mentally, instead of verbally.


  26. January 18th, 2012 at 10:43 pm      Reply carlya1 Says:

    In Puck’s final speech, he is saying:

    To all the actors we may have offended, think of it like I do and everything will seem fine-when you saw all these abstract visions, you were asleep and all this was a crazy dream. Please don’t be upset with me. If you forgive us, we will make it up to you. I am honest Puck, and I promise that, in time, we will make everything right. If not, you may call me a liar. Good night to all. Give me some applause, if you forgive me, and I will make everything right.

    Shakespeare manages to tie up all the loose ends in the play and create more at the same time. He says that dreamers, poets, and madmen are all made up of the same thing-imagination. The poet sees everything that exists and is fantasy and is able to put it on paper. He is the ultimate poet so he is really complementing himself. The ending is saying that all of the play was truly a dream, an the audience cannot tell if it was or not, which was the genius behind this play. The final speech leaves the audience confused and unable to distinguish reality and fantasy. Shakespeare saw the world in a completely different way than the average human so this play was to demonstrate his visions to the public, but this confuses ten because without the complex mind of an imaginative person, you can’t comprehend this concept of fantasy vs reality. This makes people now still question what is a dream and what is real. The point is that the only real things in life are what you make reality.


    • January 19th, 2012 at 12:38 am      Reply innag2 Says:

      I 100% agree with you on everything! I also wrote about how the only real things in life are what you make, and how some people seem to be living in a dream all the time. I love your theme of fantasy vs reality!


  27. January 18th, 2012 at 10:44 pm      Reply carak1 Says:

    If we shadows have offended,
    Think but this, and all is mended,
    That you have but slumber’d here
    While these visions did appear.
    And this weak and idle theme,
    No more yielding but a dream,
    Gentles, do not reprehend:
    if you pardon, we will mend:
    And, as I am an honest Puck,
    If we have unearned luck
    Now to ‘scape the serpent’s tongue,
    We will make amends ere long;
    Else the Puck a liar call;
    So, good night unto you all.
    Give me your hands, if we be friends,
    And Robin shall restore amends.

    If we actors have offended you, know this and all will be alright: you have simply fallen asleep and all you have witnessed is a dream. All you have seen was weak and the child of an idle brain (Queen Mab!), nothing more than a dream. Gentlepeople, please do not be angry. As I am an honest fairy, we will make amends soon if we are not criticized. If not, call me a liar. So, good night to you all. Give me your hands and if you forgive me, I shall restore amends.

    Puck’s speech is very unexpected and interesting. He essentially says that the entire play so far has been a dream. It’s almost as if he is saying that life is but a dream. I think Shakespeare was trying to say that at least in the play, all the humans are just dreaming and it is all an illusion, but the fairies are awake and controlling everyone and everything. It is interesting that Shakespeare would say this. He is almost discrediting all of his work as just a dream. I think Shakespeare must have a bit loopy and maybe even depressed. Often, artists have their demons which create beautiful things. He questioned many things, even whether or not life is even real. This speech is very similar to the theme of Inception, which makes you question the movie and even life- are we really living in a dream? Are there fairies that control our lives and we are just part of their world? Really amazing art makes you question everything, just as this does.


  28. January 18th, 2012 at 10:46 pm      Reply amandaf2 Says:

    At the end of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Puck gives a speech directly to the audience.

    If we have upset you,
    Think about this, it will make you better.
    You have been sleeping while watching this.
    Everything was just a dream.
    However, don’t get mad at us,
    If you pardon, we will make you better.
    I am an honest Puck,
    And as long as we don’t have bad luck,
    Things will get better.
    Or you can call me a liar,
    Have a good night.
    And clap your hands,
    And I will make amends.

    At the end of the play Puck tells the audience that the whole play was just a dream. He says that the audience was sleeping during the play, and none of the events actually happened. I think that the purpose of this was to make the audience question the difference between a dream and reality. The characters in the play often have dreams that seem like reality, or they awake from a dream and think that what “happened” the night before was a dream. Over all, I really enjoyed reading A Midsummer Night’s Dream.


  29. January 18th, 2012 at 11:17 pm      Reply Anton Says:

    If anything here has offended you, view it from this perspective, and all will be well. That you were all asleep and all these occurrences had been just a mere dream. All the themes you saw throughout were all just figments of your imaginations. So please don’t get mad; if you pardon us, we will fix this all. I promise to fix all the problems that may have aroused soon, or call me a liar. Good night, if you don’t get mad at me, everything will be great. Wow Robin sounds like one of those people trying to calm down a crowd after something unexpected happens at a performance. He is saying that the real dreamers were not the characters, but the audience. Shakespeare is saying that the theater and plays are all just recorded dreams, and nothing that happens on stage is real. Magic exist within ones imagination. This is linked to Theseus’s speech about how poets simply record dreams. Almost all the dream references seem to remind me of inception. This is one of those “question reality” things. Things don’t seem odd when one is in their dream, but do when one wakes up. Although dreams may have significance to them, the world is still one of imagination.


  30. January 18th, 2012 at 11:20 pm      Reply leonl2 Says:

    This is a paraphrasing of Puck’s speech:

    If we actors have offended you,
    All will be fixed if you think
    That you have slept here
    While these visions did appear.
    And this weak and idle play you have watched,
    is no more than a dream,
    People, do not be mad at us:
    if you excuse us, we will fix:
    And, as I am an honest Puck,
    If we have undeserved luck
    Now to escape the taunts (of the audience),
    We will make amends soon;
    Else I, Puck am a liar;
    So, good night to you all.
    Give me your hands if we arefriends,
    And Robin shall restore amends.


    • January 18th, 2012 at 11:29 pm      Reply leonl2 Says:

      I don’t understand why we would need to be mad at the actors and why Puck is saying sorry and all. To me, there was nothing really wrong with the entire play, it was actually pretty funny. I think maybe Puck/Robin says this to show humor and make the audience laugh. First of all he is breaking the rules of acting by talking to the audience, and then he is saying what you saw was a dream and to forgive us for whatever we did, even though it was a marvelous play. Therefore I think Puck is just playing.

      According to Puck, we are the ones who are really dreaming. The actors weren’t the ones dreaming, it was actually the audience who dreamed that they existed in the first place. Theater… Magic… Dreaming… Reality… I think Shakespeare is implying that they all go together in a way. Who knows if what we are experience right now is a dream or a reality? How would we know if something that happened was caused by magic? We can only imagine.

      Puck’s speech would make better sense if we were actually watching the play. Shakespeare intended the play to be acted, so Puck saying that we were dreaming makes more sense when done to an audience to us readers.


  31. January 18th, 2012 at 11:27 pm      Reply nicholasm14 Says:

    At the end of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Puck “broke the fourth wall” and said a speech explaining the play itself to the audience. He basically said:

    If we actors have offended you in any way, consider this thought and everything shall be alright: you have merely fallen asleep and the play itself and all you have seen has been a dream. This weak and idle thing has merely been the wandering of the subconscious as you sleep. Ladies and gentlemen, do not become angry, as we will fix anything that might have angered you all. Since I am an honest fairy known as Puck, we will soon make these amends to stop any criticism by the crowd. If not, you may call me a liar. Good night to you all. Please applaud if you forgive any problems in the play, and I shall make the changes.

    Puck’s speech is interesting and makes an interesting point: Is life but a dream? Shakespeare was basically saying that the entire play was a dream and implied that life itself could be considered an illusion created by humans when we sleep. We have no real evidence that we are not in a dream right now, and I think this might be the point Shakespeare was trying to make. He could also be implying that the boundary between reality and dreams is obscure and it is difficult to decipher real from unreal. While we are dreaming, we may think that what happened or what we heard actually happened, and this is further evidence that reality and dreams can be difficult to tell apart. It is a confusing but interesting concept, and reminds me of Inception. A Midsummer Night’s Dream could just be a dream we had in this life that could also be just a dream.


  32. January 19th, 2012 at 12:31 am      Reply innag2 Says:

    If we as actors have offended you,
    Think this an all will be fixed:
    That you were asleep through this,
    While these dreams went through your mind.
    And this weak and trivial theme of the play,
    Was only just a dream,
    Gentlemen, don’t blame us,
    If you forgive us, we will improve.
    And, upon the fact that I’m an honest Puck,
    If we have bad luck
    To receive hisses and boos from the audience,
    We will fix it even sooner.
    Otherwise, you can call Puck a liar.
    So good night to you all.
    Applaud for us, if we are to be friends,
    And I, as Robin, shall start improving.

    What Puck is saying is that this entire play was actually a dream, and that the audience had a dream within a dream within a dream. Shakespeare is telling the audience and the reader that everything in life is really only as you take it. If you take everything as being a dream, and living in your own fantasy, then good for you. But if you believe in reality, and live in the real world, then you should believe in such things that seem ridiculous, and don’t ridicule people for their own way of living, or for what they do. For someone who didn’t like the play, Shakespeare is basically saying, “And? So? Am I supposed to care? You didn’t like it? Good for you. Pretend it didn’t happen. It really won’t make a difference to me, but don’t bash the play or ridicule it, because it really isn’t your place to do so.” I think this can apply in real life scenarios, too, like with bullying. You don’t like me? Fine. You hate my outfit? Wonderful. My hair looks bad? Amazing. Seriously, have your opinion, but keep it to yourself, because honestly, I don’t want to hear it. I think that’s what Shakespeare is trying to say in this speech by Puck.


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