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“Well,” said Wemmick, “he’ll give you wine, and good wine. I’ll give you punch, and not bad punch….” September 22, 2010

Posted by equinson in : Great Expectations , trackback

Compare and contrast Pip’s experiences at Mr. Wemmick’s and Mr. Jaggers’ homes.  How do these experiences contribute to Pip’s education in the ways of the world? 

Use specific details from the text to support your opinions. Many of you have done a good job reviewing events in general, but remember:  as Mr. Jaggers says, you must have evidence!  Moreover, you want to go beyond providing a summary of what happened.   You need to provide some analysis.  Show  what you are thinking!

It might be helpful to know that last year, the average response to the question above was approximately 200 words.    Also, you must always follow the rules of standard written English.  I recommend that you type your response in Microsoft Word first, and take advantage of spell check, etc., and then cut and paste your comment onto our blog.

Please note! (added at about 9pm) I have replied to some of your comments this evening to offer encouragement and suggestions.  It is getting a little late for me now, and I can’t reply to each of you, although I would like to.  But for those of you signing on later in the evening, be sure to check out your classmates work and read my replies as a way to guide your own responses.  My hope is that this will help all of us write and think more deeply.  I have great expectations of all of you!

Additional note! (added at about 10:10pm) I am now signing off, but your comments are MUCH, MUCH better than on previous nights.  Good work!  Keep it up.  I still have great expectations of all of you!  :)

Comments»

# Zachariah Big Bang SNSD - September 22, 2010

At Mr. Wemmick’s house, which is a small house that Mr. Wemmick made by himself, I think that Pip had a very good time there. He seemed to enjoy talking with Mr. Wemmick and eating the food and punch that Mr. Wemmick made himself. Also, Mr. Wemmick showed Pip his flagpole and told him that every night, he shoots a cannon to please the aged man, which is his father. Pip also enjoyed the next morning at Mr. Wemmick’s castle. After breakfast at Mr. Wemmick’s house, Pip and Mr. Wemmick started off to Mr. Jagger’s office. Pip noticed that Mr. Wemmick seemed to grow “dryer” as they got closer to the office. At Mr. Jagger’s house, Pip, Herbert, Drummle, and Startop meet Mr. Jaggers. Mr. Jaggers seems to like Drummle the best but tells Pip to stay away from him. Also, Mr. Jaggers shows everyone Molly’s, his housemaid, wrists that are scarred. I think that Pip did not enjoy his visit at Mr. Jagger’s home. These experiences contribute to Pip’s education in the way of the world by Pip noticing that people can have different personalities in their personal life and their professional life.

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    # equinson - September 22, 2010

    Good! Now what lesson are we supposed to learn from these two homes? Why would Dickens include them so close together?

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# Nicole - September 22, 2010

I think that Pip had a better time at Wemmick’s home in terms of the spirit of his home and how he was treated. But. at Mr. Jagger’s home, I think Pip had a better time in things and objects. I think Pip enjoyed how at Wemmick’s home, Wemmick’s professional life was left at home but at Mr. Jagger’s home, his professional life was carried home with him. Also, I think the whole work “spirit” is at Mr. Jagger’s home too (the harsh and rigid mr. Jaggers) But with Wemmick, he has a totally different spirit at home. And when he gets closer to the office, Pip refers to him as getting dryer. Pip also might have enjoyed how at Wemmick’s home, Wemmick spent more time alone with Pip and showing interest in Pip’s life. They stayed up until nine talking while Wemmick smoked his pipe and then he shot the cannon to please his old man. Whereas at Mr. Jagger’s home, Pip felt kind of left to the side because Mr. Jaggers whas more interested in Drummle.

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    # equinson - September 22, 2010

    Why was Jaggers so interested in Drummle, do you suppose? Odd really.

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      # Nicole - September 23, 2010

      I guess he was interested in him because Drummle reminded him of himself and thought that maybe he could be a promising lawyer as well

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# Justin - September 22, 2010

I think Pip enjoyed his experience at Wemmick’s house more than Jaggers’ house. Wemmick talked with Pip about Pip’s life. They ate together and drank punch. He shot a cannon at nine to please the aged man, his father. However, Wemmick changes when he leaves his house. His work life and private life was seperated. Pip and his “gang”, Herbert, Drummle, and Startop, went to have dinner with Jaggers. They had delicious food and rum. Jaggers paid more attention to Drummle than to Pip, and I think Pip felt left out.

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    # equinson - September 22, 2010

    True! So what are we to learn from these two experiences? Why would Dickens include these two episodes so close together, almost in counterpoint to each other?

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# Lelouch vi Britannia (jenna) - September 22, 2010

When Pip went over Mr. Wemmick’s house, he noticed that it was a rather small house. It had nice gothic aspects to the house and was entirely built by Mr. Wemmick. He lives there with the Aged man, who he likes to please with nodding of his head. Even with the smallness of the house, Pip had a good time looking at Mr. Wemmick’s possessions and having a mostly home cooked meal. He also enjoyed sitting and talking to Mr. Wemmick while drinking their punch. Pip enjoyed the company of Mr. Wemmick so much that he even stayed over the night. In the morning of the next day, while Pip and Mr. Wemmick were getting ready to go to Mr. Jaggers’ office, Pip noticed that Mr. Wemmick really doesn’t like going to work. Pip figures this because Mr. Wemmick gets more and more reserved when they get closer to the office.

Now that evening was completely different then the one Pip had at Mr. Jaggers’ house. For one, the house was a big house, and more people were coming over to eat. Mr. Jaggers for some reason invited Pip’s three friends over when Pip was going to first see the house. Obviously, this doesn’t exactly suit Pip because the friends that Mr. Jaggers invited included Drummle, whom Pip really doesn’t like. Now, none of this night was really that good. There was much fighting between all of them, mostly provoked by Mr. Jaggers. This being said, the night ended so badly that Startop and Drummle walked on two opposite sides of the road to go home.

These two nights have led Pip to believe that people, even if they work together, can have completely different personalities, especially when it doesn’t pertain to work.

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    # equinson - September 23, 2010

    Good detail! And I like the way you started to really analyze what Pip was meant to learn. But let’s see if we can go even further. Certainly, he learns that Jaggers and Wemmick have different home lives. What makes Wemmick’s better? In other words, what does Wemmick have that Jaggers lacks?

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      # Lelouch vi Britannia (jenna) - September 23, 2010

      Wemmick has compassion in his life while Jagger just strives for anger and fighting. Wemmick actually likes people while Jagger really just wants money. and to get that money, he will do anything, even hurt people. But if he is telling Pip to not interact with Drummle, isnt he trying to be good?

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# Lauren<333 - September 23, 2010

Pip seems to enjoy his stay at Mr. Wemmick’s house more than he did at Mr. Jaggers’ house because Mr. Wemmick makes him feel noticed and kind of important.
When Pip went over to Mr. Jaggers’ house for dinner and brought his friends, Mr. Jaggers takes more of an interest in Drummle (which is quite odd) and Pip has a feeling of being left out.
Pip enjoyed Mr. Wemmick’s company and had a good time talking to him and taking a look at his possesions. Mr. Wemmick also leaves his work business at work, while Mr. Jaggers brings his work home.
I think Pip has learned that people are different, some combine their personal and professional life, but some choose to keep them seperate.

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    # equinson - September 23, 2010

    OK, but do you think the only reason Pip prefers Wemmick’s house is because he Wemmick makes him feel important? What else makes Wemmick more hospitable and friendly? Explain more and give more detail about each home. :)

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# Shauna Jemma Nisa-Ree - September 23, 2010

When Pip and Startop and Drummle go to Mr. Jagger’s house for dinner, I think Pip feels that the house is a bit sad. Not sad as in, the house was too terrible for words, but sad like the area had a very gloomy feel to it. When he enters Mr. Jagger’s house, he notices something: there is something carved into the walls. I think Pip thought that the carvings looked a lot like the noose people used to hang. And two things in particular made the dinner more or less uncomfortable: the fact that Jaggers seems to bring out the worst in people (ex- Pip feels that he has to boast about his expectations), and that Jaggers asks the housekeeper to show her wrists. This obviously made her very uncomfortable and upset, the reason being that her wrists were horribly scarred.
However, Pip probably enjoyed the time he was with Mr. Wemmick a bit more because Mr. Wemmick seems to be better natured. Wemmick built his house up himself. He had a garden, a flagstaff, and some animals (I think). At nine, there was a cannon that fired, and it was fired for the “aged old man”. Wemmick showed Pip his “collection of curiosities” and made Pip punch, and the night was overall more enjoyable than the one at Jagger’s.
I think this indirectly contributes to Pip’s education because it shows that while some people are kind, some people will try to manipulate you into fighting (which, come to think of it, Jaggers probably uses the same tactics in court). It also contributes to Pip’s education of the real world because Jaggers was focused more on Drummle, and less on Pip. While this probably made Pip upset, It is somewhat educational, because in the real world, people pay more attention to certain peoples ALL THE TIME.

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    # equinson - September 23, 2010

    Excellent! I love the specific details – especially the nooses – I was going to bring that up in class.
    Also, I like the analysis. This really helps the on line conversation move forward. Good work!

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    # JCNinja - September 23, 2010

    Hi Shauna….love the detail and very to the point :P

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      # Lelouch vi Britannia (jenna) - September 23, 2010

      true. Jagger did cause all the fighting that happened.

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        # Shauna Jemma Nisa-Ree - September 23, 2010

        thank you every one!

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# JCNinja - September 23, 2010

In Great Expectations, Pip stays at both Mr. Wemmick’s house and at Mr. Jagger’s house.
Mr.Wemmick’s home was not a large grand house, instead it was a small home a little gothic, built personally by Mr. Wemmick. His father also lives there and Wemmick pleases him with the nodding of the head and firing a cannon every night. He talked with Pip like a friend and showed Pip his possessions which Pip enjoyed. They drank punch, had small talk and Pip, being very satisfied and happy, slept overnight. However, the next morning, when they both went to Mr.Jagger’s office, he realizes that the closer they approach the office, the “dryer” Mr. Wemmick gets. From this we realize that Mr.Wemmick does not particularly enjoy his job and that Mr. Wemmick is completely different from home than at work. Therefore, leaving his work “air” at work.

When Pip visits Mr.Jagger’s house, the living style is drastically different. For one, almost everything is about grandmess and material things. Two, the work “air” that Mr. Jaggers has in his office is brought back home. Also, Mr.Jaggers invites Herbert, Drummle and Startop. Although Pip enjoyed the objects and material things in the house, he did not particularly enjoy the way he was treated. He notices that Mr. Jaggers pays more attention to Drummle than to Herbert or himself and therefore feels left out. An argument also breaks out, kindled by Mr. Jaggers himself. Pip did not particularly enjoy that evening.

Through these two experiences, Pip learns that people, though they work together, they can two completely different personalities. However, I think that he develops a personal opinion that people, no matter how grand their material things are, their character is what matters most and how they treat people which determines themselves and their impression on others.

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    # equinson - September 23, 2010

    Yes! Great details and analysis as well. :)

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# maishak1 - September 23, 2010

When Pip arrived at Mr. Wemmick’s house, he saw a little wooden cottage in the middle of many small gardens. The door and windows were much too small as well. At his little ‘grocery shop’ he has a pig, fowls, and grows cucumbers. Mr. Wemmick took Pip to his castle. Over there, he offered Pip punch. At Mr. Wemmick’s, Pip and Mr. Wemmick had a jolly time. Their conversations just seemed so natural. Overall, it seemed as though Pip enjoyed his time at Mr. Wemmick’s house. Mr. Wemmick is a self made man and put effort into his evening with Pip.

The next day at Mr. Jaggers house, Pip noticed Mr. Wemmick grows more quiet and conservative around Mr. Jaggers. The outside of Mr. Jaggers house needed to be painted and the windows needed to be washed. The doorway led into a stone hall which seemed little used and gloomy. Everything was well organized; things were where they were supposed to be (many law and criminal books on the bookcase). The whole house was his, but he didn’t use much of it. There was nothing really extraordinary to the house (unlike Mr. Wemmick’s house which was mad-made).

At each house, Pip meets a new character (person). At Mr. Wemmick’s house, Pip meets an aged parent whose lively. At Mr. Jaggers house, Pip meets a housekeeper, Molly. Molly has scarred wrists which Mr. Jagger points out ‘true strength’.

I imagine Mr. Wemmick’s house a setting like Snow White’s. All peppy and cheerful. Happiness from every corner just bursting out! On the contrary, Mr. Jagger’s house feels like a Dracula type of setting. I find that Mr. Jagger’s house is desolate and ordinary. Molly gives off the vibe as though it’s not as cheerful as Mr. Wemmick’s household.

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    # equinson - September 23, 2010

    Great details. Love it. But you need to analyze! What does this teach us?

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      # maishak1 - September 23, 2010

      Thanks, I think it teaches us that Mr. Wemmick could act friendly and funny, but Mr. Jaggers turns that mode off. He’s kind of like a threatening presence.

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        # equinson - September 23, 2010

        That’s true, but what does it teach Pip (and the reader by extension) about life or the world around us?

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# JCNinja - September 23, 2010

I wonder why Mr. Jaggers likes Drummle more?

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    # equinson - September 23, 2010

    me, too!

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      # maishak1 - September 23, 2010

      Did Mr. Jagger tell Pip to stay away from Drummle?

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      # _josh_e_27_ - September 23, 2010

      I think It has something to do with Jaggers testing pip in some way maybe…..

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    # The Ethanator - September 23, 2010

    It seems like Jaggers dislikes Pip for some reason

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# maishak1 - September 23, 2010

Did Mr. Jaggers tell Pip to stay away from Drummle?

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    # equinson - September 23, 2010

    Yes, he did. Why? Something to think about. And it adds to the suspense….

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      # maishak1 - September 23, 2010

      I think may be Mr. Jaggers is tricking Pip into something.

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        # equinson - September 23, 2010

        Interesting idea. I can tell you don’t really trust Jaggers…. Why not? I like the way you’re thinking, Maisha!

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          # anabelk2 - September 23, 2010

          In the description of the dinner at Mr. Jaggers house, Mr. Jagger did not use the silver utensils, and I think that is because he is not trusting in his guests, and is scaed that they might steal his silver. Also, he serves the food out by himself, showing that Mr. Jaggers is in control. Just another thought to Mr. Jagger’s character…

        # Lelouch vi Britannia (jenna) - September 23, 2010

        but if Pip would get hurt by being with Drummle, isnt it a good thing that Jaggers told him to stay away.

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          # equinson - September 23, 2010

          That’s a good point, too.

# The Ethanator - September 23, 2010

Pip’s experience at Wemmick’s and Jaggers’ house was very different. Even though Jaggers’ house was bigger and fancier, I think Pip liked Wemmick’s house better because it was warm and welcoming like Wemmick. Wemmick seems to be the opposite of this when he is at work though. Pip’s visit at Jagger’s house was sort of formal and cold. I thought it to be strange that Jaggers had such an interest in Drummle. (Drummle doesn’t seem like a spider to me.) Also, Wemmick specifically noted that he kept his work at his work and his personal things at home. For Jaggers, he had his worklife around him constantly. Pip learns that people treat their personal and professional lives very differently throughout the many social classes and neighborhoods of London.

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    # equinson - September 23, 2010

    What you say is true here, but you need more specific details from the text to support your ideas and you need to include your own analysis of what those details mean. In other words, what is the purpose of including these two home visits? What is Pip (and by extension the reader) supposed to learn?

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# tarag1 - September 23, 2010

The experience that Pip had at Mr. Wemmick’s is much different than the experience he had at Mr. Jagger’s. When Pip first got to Mr. Wemmicks, he saw the smallest house that he had ever seen with queer gothic windows and a door almost too small to fit through. Pip has such a great time at Mr. Wemmick’s house. Pip was introduced to Wemmick’s father who they refer to as “aged” and Wemmick seems very interested in what Pip has to say. They talk an awful lot about Mr. Jaggers and how people are afraid of him, they have a really nice home-cooked super and they stay up until 9 talking. Wemmick does a really good job a of keeping his professional and personal lives separate, he becomes a totally different person when he leaves work. Mr. Jaggers on the other hand is quite the opposite. His entire life revolves around work. When Pip dines with Jaggers, it is a completely different experience than dining with Wemmick. At Jaggars Pip dines with Herbert, Startop and Drummle. I think that Pip feels very left out while he is at Jaggers’ because Jaggers is focusing all of his attention on Drummle which I don’t think Pip appreciated very much. I think that Dickens included these two events right after one another so that we as readers are able to compare and contrast these two events.

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    # j-dog24 - September 23, 2010

    I found it very cool how well Wemmick was at keeping his personal and business life separate. I also found it to be funny that they spent so much time talking about how afraid people were of Jaggers!

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    # equinson - September 23, 2010

    Good overall summary, but you should include more specific details AND be sure to analyze as deeply as you can. What are Pip and reader supposed to learn from these events?

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    # Sophia G - September 23, 2010

    I totally agree that he puts these events back to back so that the reader compares them. I think it shows the major differences between the two characters

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# _josh_e_27_ - September 23, 2010

In chapters 23-26, Pip Visits both Wemmick’s house and Jaggers house. These two houses are very different in both size and feeling. When Pip visits Wemmick’s house, he sees that it is very quaint with home-grown cucumbers, a cannon, and a real flagstaff on which Wemmick raises a flag on every Sunday, to please his elder parents. His home is very quaint and small. Wemmick also fires off a Cannon and nods daily for the enjoyment of his elder parents. However, Jagger’s house is quite contrary to Wemmick’s. Jaggers house is a huge house, in which he only uses 3 rooms, that he shows Pip and Pip’s friends when Pip goes over there. During the meal, the conversation drifts to muscles, and Jaggers grab’s his servants hand, and shows her writs to the boys. He says that few men even have as strong a grip as her. Her wrists are huge, but are massively scarred throughout. In Wemmick’s home, we learn and pip learns that a small, yet meaningful home can be very good. From Jagger’s Home, we and Pip learn that a huge home may not pay off, because one person can only use so many rooms.

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    # equinson - September 23, 2010

    An interesting analysis. Certainly, Wemmick’s home is small, while Jaggers’ home is large. And I agree, that it must be significant that Jaggers only lives in three rooms. It gives me a creepy feeling to think of that huge empty, cold house and it certainly makes an excellent contrast to Wemmick’s cramped abode, where Pip’s room is so small, he almost feels like he is balancing the flagpole on his head. And I agree with you, one lesson certainly is that it is better to have a small, happy home, than a large, empty, sad one.

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# j-dog24 - September 23, 2010

Pip’s experiences at Wemmick’s house and Jaggers’s house were completely different. I believe that Dickens, throughout this novel, is always comparing things, including Pip’s experiences in London to his town he grew up in. Wemmick’s house was beautiful and small (this can be compared to the house that Pip grew up in). This was to show that Wemmick was a very simple guy with great taste and reality. Wemmick also had an aged man living with him, he was deaf (that was like Mrs. Joe after the accident). Wemmick treated this man very kindly (as Joe, Pip, and Biddy treated Mrs. Joe). The food Pip ate at Wemmick’s house was kind of common (like the food he was used to, just a little better), better very tasteful. Also, Pip stayed in a room that was very small and looked outside (like his room). One thing I found weird about Wemmick’s house was how he and the aged man got very excited with the firing. Pip had a great time staying at Wemmick’s house, and it reminded him of his own house. Something I found cool was how Wemmick changed through the time of them leaving in the morning to them getting to Jaggers’s office, he got completely business-like. Then, Jaggers’s house was big, with great expensive items, a complete contrast to Wemmick’s house (compared to Miss Havisham’s house). At Jaggers’s house, there was a lady there that worked for Jaggers. I find there to always be a lady that takes of Pip’s interest. Jaggers has a strange attraction towards Drummle. Drummle is very down and “spider-like” (to be compared to Orlick). Jaggers wants to find out about Drummle more than any of the other friends of Pip. Pip had a very interesting time at Jaggers’s house. The two experiences Pip had were completely different. pip is now seeing the wealthier side and the common sides of London opposed to the wealthier and common sides to his home town.

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    # ryanm12 - September 23, 2010

    I think that Jason is right and that Mr.Jaggers and Mr. wemmick are completely different people and there house show there personalities.

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# Padfoot a.k.a Alison - September 23, 2010

Pip had a great time at Mr. Wemmicks house which he built himself. It was small, welcoming, and had a gothic look to it. Before they had their home cooked meal Pip met the Aged man. He was deaf and was pleases whenever someone nodded their head at him and when the cannon was fired at night. Before dinner Mr. Wemmicks showed Pip a collection of his and then at dinner they talked and had punch. Mr. Wemmicks asked Pip to have the talk not consist of his job. Pip stayed the night and in the morning they walked back to the office together. Along the way Mr. Wemmicks got dryer and acted more rigid. I can infer from his that he doesn’t really enjoy his job.

Mr. Jagger’s house was quite the opposite from Mr. Wemmicks’. It was bare and somber. It also had a work desk and books about law. This shows unlike Mr. Wemmicks, Mr. Jaggers doesn’t mind taking his work home with him. He had dinner with PIp, Drummle, Startop, and Herbert which was very fancy with a maid bringing them their food. During the night Mr. Jaggers took a liking to Drummle. At the end of the night Drummle had a fight with Pip, Startop, and Herbert about him borrowing money. He ended up almost throwing a glass at Startop. Once everyone was gone Pip went back to apologize to Mr. Jaggers about how they acted. Mr. Jaggers was still fond of Drummle yet he told Pip to stay away from him. This might be foreshadowing that Drummle might try to do something to Pip.

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# Lelouch vi Britannia (jenna) - September 23, 2010

for the summer reading assignment, could we compare a character in a book to a different character in a book instead of person from the book to myself for question 1?

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    # equinson - September 23, 2010

    YES! That is called making an inter-textual reference. Good for you!

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# Ariana - September 23, 2010

In this set of chapters, Pip viits both Mr. Jagger’s and Mr. Wemmick’s houses, and he sees how they are very differnet.
When Pip stays at Mr. Wemmick’s house every thing is very plesant. From the the whole made punch, to the way that Mr. Wemmick really cared about what Pip had to say. Wemmick’s house is very original, this is because he built everything about it himself. Because of this, his house is not large or grand, the way a rich person’s might be. Instead it is “a little wooden cottage in the midst of plots of garden, and the top of it was cut out and painted like a battery mounted with guns.” It seems as though Mr. Weemmick is very proud of the handy work he has done because he says to Pip “looks pretty good, doesn’t it”. However, it didn’t seem that Pip felt that way. He describes it as the smallest house he has ever seen, with queer gothic looking windows and a small gothic looking door. This put a very clear image in my head of what I think the house looks like. Regardless, it seems as though Pip had a very good time.
Going to Mr. Jaggers, was a compleatly different experience for Pip. The outside of Mr. Jagger’s house is not well kept. It needs a new paint job and the windows are very dirty. Inside of his house is very plan. There is alot of stone walls and law books. The stair case and rooms are all brown. And there is nothing very original and unique. Pip goes to Jagger’s with Drummle and Startop. And although Jagger’s is Pip’ gardian, he seems to be more interested in Drummel while they are eatting dinner. He tells PIp that he likes Drummel. And then says to stay away from him. Because Jagger’s took such a liking to Drummel, and there was nothing super exciting about his house, I do not think that Pip enjoyed his time there. At leat not nearly as much as he enjoyed his time at Weemick’s.
These two visits teach Pip about the different social classes in London and how they live. Jagger’s has much more money and is of a higher social class then Weemick. Therefore his house is bigger and grander. Weemick is of a lower social class and has less money. Therefore his house is smaller and built by hand.

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# ethany1 - September 23, 2010

When Pip goes to Mr.Wemmick’s house he has a nice time. Mr. Wemmick’s house is quite small, but Mr. Wemmick has made it beautiful – with gardens (with cucumbers), animals (rabbits, pigs and fowl) and castle- imitations. Mr. Wemmick’s “aged man” is kind and easily excitable- especially for their nightly firing of a gun (stinger). He is cared for by a “neat, little girl”. In addition Mr. Wemmick’s food is good and Pip’s room is acceptable but quite small. Breakfast is just as good as supper. One thing Pip notices though- is when Mr. Wemmick goes to work he “forgets” all about his little “castle”.
On the other hand, when Pip goes with Drummle, Startop and Herbert Pocket to Jaggers’ house he doesn’t have a nice time. Despite Jaggers’ house being larger than Mr. Wemmick’s, it is gloomy and bare – with dirty windows and peeling paint. Strangely, despite owning the entire house, Jaggers only uses three rooms. They are all served dinner in the nicest of these rooms- with nice furniture and a bookcase. Dinner is nicely laid and the food is pretty good- with fish, mutton and bird. Interestingly, Jaggers inquires about Drummle, and during the course of the meal, talks to him a lot. Lastly, Jaggers has a strange maid with “injured” wrists.
In both visits, the food is good. But that is about all the similarities. Mr. Wemmicks house is small, yet welcoming and warm; while Jaggers’ house is large, yet mostly gloomy and bare.
This may have contributed to Pip’s education by showing him that bigger is not always better (Jaggers’ house was bigger but less welcoming and very gloomy), and that sometimes it is better to kind than to be rich (Pip is much happier with the kind Mr. Wemmick than with the richer but less kind Jaggers).

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# Misaki_Otaku: Prongs - September 23, 2010

Wemmick’s house is rather small and gothic, as Pip calls it. I think of it as a cozy little place even if it was gothic. It would be nice, in my opinion, to have a flag pole and little gardens as my part of my house, as Wemmick’s does. Pip seems to enjoy his time at Wemmick’s house. Wemmick shows him many of his possessions, and Wemmick also shows Pip how he grew and raised his own food. (Wemmick is quite proud of the latter.) Also it seems that Pip feels comfortable there because Wemmick and Pip talk until nine o’clock while drinking punch. They are able to carry a conversation normally, and naturally. Wemmick is sweet and kind to the Aged man. The visit to Wemmick’s gothic and small house changed my view on him, and now I think he is a more caring, interesting and nice person. However the next morning, Wemmick, on his way to work, appears to change into a completely different person as he gets closer and closer to work. As Pip says, Wemmick got drier and harder. It is like he developed a split personality because of his work and Mr. Jaggers.
Meanwhile at Mr. Jaggers’ house Pip does not have a fun time. It is quite the opposite of Wemmick’s house, for it is gloomy, stately and empty. It looks like there was no decoration, only the needed stuff such as bookcases, books, tables etc. Pip feels that he must show the best of himself, and boast at dinner, which makes me think that he was feeling slightly uncomfortable. Jaggers’ also makes the housekeeper uncomfortable by making her show her scarred wrists. It is mysterious why Jaggers’ tells Pip to stay from Drummle or as Jaggers calls him, Spider.
Compared to Wemmick’s house, Jaggers’ was quite official, and not as cozy and welcoming. I feel their home symbolizes their personalities out of work. Jaggers is very official, while Wemmick’s is welcoming and nice, such as his house.

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# anabelk2 - September 23, 2010

Pip’s visits to Mr. Wemmick’s house and Mr. Jagger’s house were very different, and I think that is because these two men have completely different personalities.
Mr. Wemmick’s home was a little wooden cottage that he built himself and of which he was extremely proud. Mr. Wemmick also had a garden, in which he grew vegetables. Although Pip thought that the dinner was not very good, the overall entertainment was excellent! I think that Wemmick’s little cottage seemed familiar to Pip, almost like home because it was so unpretentious. Mr. Wemmick reminds me of Joe, because of his sweet and jolly nature.
Pip’s experience in Mr. Jagger’s house was the complete opposite of his experience in Mr. Wemmick’s house. Mr. Jagger’s house was large, dark, plain, seldom used, and as Pip says, “proffesional looking”. The main color scheme in Mr. Jagger’s house is dark brown, making the house seem boring and opressive, just like his office. Unlike Mr. Wemmick’s house, Pip describes the food as the very best and most expensive. Mr. Jaggers seems like someone who wants to control everyone and he won’t let the guests take food for themselves, or use the silver utensils, possibly, in fear of them stealing it. Also, I think that the most interesting part about this section of the novel was the housekeeper. I am still confused about her relationship with Mr. Jaggers and how she got her scars. I am excited to read on and find out!
It is hard for me to say which dinner visit Pip enjoyed more, because both were good and bad in different ways. Like I stated above, the comfort and cozy sense of Mr. Wemmick’s home is nothing like Mr. Jagger’s dark and impressive house. These visits shows us and Pip how different the social classes are during that time period, and how there are both negative and possitive aspects about wealth.

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# victoriaz2 - September 23, 2010

Compared to Mr. Jaggars, Wemmicks is overall a fairly nice guy…at least to Pip. I believe Wemmick also mentioned that it would be an absolute HONOR to dine with Pip. Wemmick’s house was the VERY small wooden one surrounded on all sides by gardens living in a dull neighborhood. Wemmick grows the garden and vegetables himself and feels rather proud of his work. He had also built a fountain…I think he’s really into architecture by the way. He led Pip to the castle where he met his dad, a happy but deaf man. I think that it’s nice that he’s letting his father stay with him. He offered him some punch that was “not bad.” Pip learns from Wemmicks that business and private life are two completely different things and when you go to one, you leave the other behind. (it turns out Jaggars has never been to Wemmick’s)He also fires some bang or shot that greatly excites the old man which I think is also quite kind of him. He also showed Pip his curiosities and although the dinner was not fabulous, Pip greatly enjoyed himself. As they walked closer and closer to the office, his mouth got thinner and thinner and when he got to the office he transformed and acted as if he never knew of any the other life. Wemmick warns him during their walk to his house that he should be prepared for the invitation of going to Jaggar’s house for dinner.

Pip went with his “gang” to Jaggars. His place was dirty and badly in need of renovation. (outside) The inside was was bare and gloomy just like his office…big shocker. His whole house is kinda gloomy too what with the dark browm walls. He also seemed to have brought his work home as PIp saw with his stacks of papers and bookshelves. The house keeper is very quiet and scared/hesitant when she’s around her master like she’s afraid she’s going to be punished and Jaggars realizes that and seems to keep her in suspense. Dinner was served as only the best foods, not in the least bit less. Jaggars also seemed to be interested in Drummble wierdly…and he began talking to Drummble as if he were the only one there. It makes Drummble think proudly of himself and it also makes him think that he should be the master of them all. During their conversations, everyone seems to brag a lot and speak before they think, making fools of themselves. Jaggar forces her to show the deep scars on her disfigured wrist even though she is against it, which I believe really brings out his harsh side compared to sweet old Wemmick. (proves to them what true strength is)They get drunk and a fight breaks out between Drummble and Pip on lending money. Overall, I really don’t think Pip had a good experience and won’t be going back anytime soon.

I think that he learned that yes Jaggars is rich, but is he even pleasant at all? (I think his house will answer that one) A person shouldn’t be judged upon how rich tey are, but their personalities and the lives they live.

I believe his house is sort of related to Ms. Havisham’s as to the unused and dirty part. Also, Wemmicks reminds me of Joe’s house, all cozy and small and really where Pip feels at home.

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# Ryan Morales - September 23, 2010

Pip enjoyed his time at Mr.Wemmicks house it was very small, dark, and Goth but also very welcoming and seemed friendly. Mr.Wemmick made his house by himself and does everything by himself to keep the house running. His house is very beautiful even though it has a gun on top of the house’s roof. Pip has a very awkward time at Mr. Jagger’s house mostly because Mr. Jaggers takes a strange interest in one of pips associates that he does not like and thinks is strange. Mr. Jagger’s house is very plain and unfriendly. The house has many books all about law or some kind of criminal justice.

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# taylorr4 - September 23, 2010

In this part “Great Expectations”, Pip visits the homes of both Mr. Wemmick and Mr. Jaggers. Pip went to Mr. Wemmicks house alone, but he was asked to bring his friends along when he went to Mr. Jaggers’s home.He discovers that the homes of these two men are very different.
Mr. Wemmick’s home had a very welcoming feel to it, and it very small and surrouded by gardens. He grew cucumbers in his garden and he had many animals, such as pigs, rabbits, and fowlers. The house had gothic windows, a gothic door, and guns mounted on the roof. He had built most of it himself, and was very proud of his handy work. An aged man lived in Mr. Wemmick’s house, who was cared for by a little girl during the day. He was cheerful and content, but was very deaf, and he was also very proud of his son’s construction of the house. Mr. Wemmick didn’t like to intermingle his home and office environments. During his stay at Mr. Wemmick’s house Pip conversed with Mr. Wemmick and the old man, drank punch, and watched the gun being fired. It was an enjoyable and comfortable visit.

On the other hand, Mr. Jaggers’s house was larger than Mr. Wemmick’s, with dirty windows, and was in need of painting. The rooms were dark and dull, but were well furnished. Unlike Mr. Wemmick, Mr. Jaggers had slight traces of his office around his house, including papers, and books. At Mr. Jaggers home, housekeepers bustled around, and waited on them as they ate. One of the female houskeepers had scarred wrists that were displayed to the men during dinner. The food was plentiful and well prepared, and the meal included multiple courses. Pip was frustrated during his visit at Mr. Jaggers’s house because Mr. Jaggers’s was very intrigued by Drummle, and didn’t pay much attention to Pip.

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# AudreyTheValleyFrog :) - September 23, 2010

Pip goes to both Mr. Wemmick and Mr. Jaggers house in this part of the book. Their houses are total opposites, just like their personalities.
Mr. Wemmick’s house was inviting and cozy. Mr. Wemmick built it himself and the house sort of has a gothic feel. Many beautiful gardens surround it. It was rather small and Pip enjoyed his time alone with Mr. Wemmick. They have some punch and talk to Mr. Wemmick’s father who lives with him and is deaf but manages to have a positive additude. They fired a cannon evrey day for that sweet old man. Mr. Wemmick also shows Pip some of his possesions. They stayed up talking and enjoying eachother’s company.Overall Pip had a wonderful time at Mr. Wemmicks cottage.
Mr. Jaggers house was a different story. Pip went with his friends and that drew a lot of attention away from Pip, and he did not like feeling left out. It was gloomy and definitly had a dirty exterior. The inside was huge but unwelcoming. The house was gloomy, plain, and felt kind of like his office, with papers shuffled about. It was fully furnished and had some expensive looking objects and antiques laying around for display. They had a magnificent dinner, although Mr. Jaggers was mainly focused on Drummle. To me, Mr. Jaggers seems he likes to flaunt his wealth rather than enjoying the time he spends with others. The housekeeper was timid and a tad nervous and shaken it seems. She did not seem happy with her life. Pip’s visit to Mr. Jaggers was rather depressing compared to Mr. Wemmick’s visit.
These two men are also different because Mr. Wemmicks is leading two seperate lives; one for work and the other for everything else and as he approaches the office he seems more and more unhappy; whereas Mr. Jaggers chose to bring his work home with him, based on the fact that he has papers all around his house. What I learned from this is that different people have different ways of life, even though they are somehow broght together by something else (theit job).

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# Swimfreakh2o - September 23, 2010

When Pip goes to Mr. Wemmick’s home, he notices that it is the smallest house that he has ever seen. Although it is small, Pip seems to enjoy his stay there very much so. It is a beautiful property that has a wonderful garden where Mr. Wemmick grows cucumbers, to make his outstanding salads. It has a castle where the Age’d man (Wemmick’s father) stays. Wemmick gives the age’d man lots of nods and tells Pip to do the same, because it makes him feel very happy and joyful. He also performs a nightly gun firing for the Age’d man. Wemmick’s kindness and hospitality really tells us a lot about him as a character, and about his personality and values. As the night proceeds, Pip and Wemmick bond over supper and punch.
In the morning, Pip heads over with Jaggers, Drummle, Startop, and Herbert to Jaggers home. As soon as Pip arrives there, he notices that the house is very large and grand but only three of the rooms are used by Jaggers. It seems to me that he must feel very alone in that large house.
For some reason Mr. Jaggers takes an unexpected liking to Drummle. Throughout the meal he takes up most of Jaggers attention. THen as they are departing, Pip goes to talk to his guardian privately. At the end of their conversation, Jaggers tells Pip that he took a great liking to Drummle, but wouldn’t want him to hang around with Pip. I find this very confusing and can’t quite understand why Jaggers would say that about a boy that he took a liking to.
In both of Pip’s visits, he has very different experiences. At Mr. Wemmick’s house, Pip feels at home and comfortable. Where when he is at Mr. Jaggers home, he feels uncomfortable and out of place. Mr. Wemmick’s home is quaint, homey and sweet. While Mr. Jaggers home is lonesome, sad, and cold. In my opinion each man’s home symbolizes their personality in a way. It just goes to show that living in a small, happy home, is better than living in a large and lonesome home.

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# P-Zizzle - September 23, 2010

In my opinion, Mr. Pip enjoyed Mr. Wemmick’s dinner party better than Mr. Jaggers’ dinner party. This is because Wemmick’s house was homier, where Mr. Jaggers’ house looks largely professional. Also, at Mr. Wemmick’s home Pip is the only one there besides Mr. Wemmick and the Age’d who is Mr. Wemmicks father. When in front of the Age’d Mr. Wemmick tells Pip to nod because it makes the Age’d happy. After all the Age’d is hard of hearing. Every night Mr. Wemmick fires “Stinger” (a very loud cannon) so the Age’d can hear something. It is funny because after Wemmick shot “Stinger” the Age’d exclaimed, “He shot I heard him!”
Mr. Jaggers invites Pip and his “friends” to go have dinner at his house. As soon as Mr. Jaggers sets eyes on Drummel he is interested in the depressed looking man. It is strange that Mr. Jaggers is interested in the most boring character of them all. It would have made sense if Jaggers was interested in Startop the charismatic one. Also it struck Pip when Jaggers made the waitress show her wrists. All in all Pip enjoyed his stay with Mr. Wemmick more.

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    # $$Ryan Morales$$ - September 23, 2010

    I think peter is right in that Pip enjoyed his time at Mr.Wemmicks

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# tiarar1 - September 23, 2010

When you compare Mr. Jaggers and Mr. Wemmicks, they are completely different.
Pip was offered by Mr, Wemmicks to stay over at his house. He said it was an honor to have Pip stay.Mr. Wemmicks house was a small cottage surrounded by gardens. He also took care of his aged parent. The aged parent was a very jolly, but deaf person. Mr.Wemmicks states that he is his own carpenter, engineer, gardener and plumber. He built a fountain out of very little water. He showed Pip a flagpole he has. He runs up the flag every Sunday.Mr.Wemmicks and Pip talk about every thing for the longest time. Pip asks if Mr. Jaggers ever came here. Mr. Wemmicks tells Pip how his office life and private life is completely different. Mr. Jaggers had never seen the house or the aged parent. They continued to talk throughout dinner. When it was almost nine o’clock, Mr Wemmicks gets up to do gun-fire. He says its a treat for his aged parent. Aftewards, Pip is taken to his room for the night. It wasn’t bad. It was small but Pip liked it. I think Pip liked Mr. Wemmicks house because it remined him of his sisters house.

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    # tiarar1 - September 23, 2010

    u dint know wat happened but it sent by itself.

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# tiarar1 - September 23, 2010

“continuation of my blog”
Pip and his “gang” went off to Mr. Jaggers house. Mr Jaggers house was a very big house with more than 2 rooms. It was very crowded and not that neat. Mr. Jaggers had a shelf full of his work stuff. Apparently Mr. Jaggers does not separate his private and office life. He seemed to have a particular interest in Drummle, or as he called him, “spider”
They had a very fancy, rich dinner. Mr.Jaggers house-keeper was a very scared woman. It seemed as if she feared Mr. Jaggers. While the “spider” was showing off his muscles, Mr. Jaggers made his maid show her scarred wrist against her will. He said that a woman wrist was truly strong compared to any man. This shows how he treats others. He acted like she had no feelings or emotion. like she was some kind of toy. Pip disliked Mr. Jaggers even more now.

Mr. Wemmicks and Mr. Jaggers may work together,but that did not mean they were alike. Mr. Jaggers was rich and nasty. But, Mr. Wemmicks was a very sensitive and caring person. He was not rich like Mr. Jaggers , so he valued every small thing he had.
This is what made Pip like Mr. Wemmicks even more.

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# Sophia G - September 23, 2010

In these chapters, Pip visits Mr. Jaggers house and Mr. Wemmick’s house and sees how they act in a different environment. Wemmick’s house is very small, but they refer to it as a “castle”. It has a drawbridge in the front and the inside has odd decorations. He also has his “aged parent” living in a back room. This aged parent is quite odd, because he gets pleasure from people nodding at him and raising flag poles. Wemmick mentions that he leaves all his work at the office, and his personal life stays very separate. I think this forms a foil between Wemmick and Jaggers. When he goes to Mr. Jaggers’s house for dinner, Pip enters this massive house and has a big meal. Mr. Jaggers even treats his housekeeper as some sort of witness and seems like hes always interrogating her. During dinner, he points out the weaknesses of his dinner guests and starts an argument. Jaggers seems like he has never left the court room and is constantly trying to pry information out of people, the opposite of Wemmick who leaves his work at the office. Jaggers even has the same habits that he conducts both at home and at work, like when Pip goes back to say thank you and sees him washing him hands and drying them.

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# rachel - September 23, 2010

I think pip had a very good time at wemmick’s house. He said that it was like a castle even though it was small. It sounds like a very nice place, and wemmick seemed very proud of it. He had a nice garden, with many plants and animals. Also,he handmade punch and made the food himself. Wemmick’s house seemed very bright and cheerful. On the other hand, Mr. Jaggers’ house seemed very dark and gloomy. It was very large, but Mr. Jaggers only used three rooms. There was a sort of depressing feel to it. Mr. Jaggers brought out the worst in his guests, and the dinner almost ended in a fight. At the end of the dinner, Mr. Jaggers was washing his hands, and you got a feeling that he was glad that the dinner was over.

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