March 27

O my love, my wife!

Tonight you must finish reading the play and notice all the differences between the film (as far as we viewed it) and the the text.  Then, paraphrase and analyze Romeo’s soliloquy, Act V, scene iii.    What metaphors, references, and comparisons does he use?  How does this help the reader or audience member understand his anguish?  What insight about life and death is Shakespeare conveying to his audience?

O my love! my wife!
Death, that hath suck’d the honey of thy breath,
Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty:
Thou art not conquer’d; beauty’s ensign yet
Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,
And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.
Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet?
O, what more favour can I do to thee,
Than with that hand that cut thy youth in twain
To sunder his that was thine enemy?
Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,
Why art thou yet so fair? shall I believe
That unsubstantial death is amorous,
And that the lean abhorred monster keeps
Thee here in dark to be his paramour?
For fear of that, I still will stay with thee;
And never from this palace of dim night
Depart again: here, here will I remain
With worms that are thy chamber-maids; O, here
Will I set up my everlasting rest,
And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars
From this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last!
Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O you
The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss
A dateless bargain to engrossing death!
Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide!
Thou desperate pilot, now at once run on
The dashing rocks thy sea-sick weary bark!
Here’s to my love! [Drinks.]  O true apothecary!
Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die.          [Falls.]

R&J blog #18


Copyright © 2018. All rights reserved.

Posted March 27, 2019 by equinson in category Romeo and Juliet

22 thoughts on “O my love, my wife!

  1. angelicac1

    Oh my love! My wife!
    Death, that has sucked your breath away,
    Has no power on your beauty:
    You aren’t defeated; Beauty still lies
    On the red of your lips and cheeks,
    Death hasn’t reached them yet
    Tybalt, are you lying there in your bloody shroud?
    What more favor can I do to you,
    That with the hand that killed you
    Use it to kill the one who was your enemy?
    Forgive me, cousin! Oh, Juliet,
    Why are you still so beautiful? Should I believe
    that death is in love with you,
    and the awful monster keeps you here to be his lover?
    Because of that idea, I’ll stay with you;
    And I will never leave this dark place
    Here, here I’ll stay
    With worms that are your chambermaids.
    I’ll sleep here forever.
    I’ll forget about my troubling bad luck.
    Eyes, look for the last time!
    Arms, take your last embrace! And lips, oh you
    Are the doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss
    That will complete the deal I have made with death eternally.
    Come, you bitter poison, come, unsavory guide!
    You desperate pilot, let’s run our sea-sick ship into the rocks!
    Here’s to my love! That druggist was right!
    His drugs are quick.So I die with a kiss.

    After reading the play and quickly watching the scene in the film during class, I found a striking difference between the text and the film. It was that the film left out the duel between Romeo and Paris. Paris wasn’t even shown in the scene at all so it never showed the killing of him. After reading Romeo’s soliloquy in the text, I noticed that Romeo makes a reference to “stars” again which is something that he seems to reference often. He basically has this idea that everything is determined by fate and because of that, he started to regret his decisions because he believes he could have saved Juliet. Through this idea, I believe that Shakespeare is trying to tell us to listen and pay attention to the advice that is given to us. A few scenes ago when Balthazar told Romeo the news about Juliet, he tried to warn Romeo to have patience and to not act impulsively again, but Romeo didn’t listen and he refused to stay put. Of course this isn’t his fault because his emotions were blinding him once again and I don’t think any person would’ve stayed put if they found out that their loved one passed. Romeo still could have tried to take some time to process what Balthazar was saying and maybe everything would have gone well for him.

    Reply
  2. Laila Sayegh

    Oh, my love! My wife!
    Death has taken the sweetness from your breath
    But it has not stolen your beauty
    You are not conquered, there is still
    red in red in your lips and cheeks
    Death hasn’t made them pale yet
    Tybalt, do you lie there in your bloody sheet?
    What service do I owe,
    with my hand that ended your young life,
    to take the life of your enemy
    Forgive me, cousin! My dear, Juliet!
    Why do you still look so beautiful? Should I believe
    that this horrible death loves you?
    And he keeps you here,
    to be his lover
    Because of that frightening idea, I will stay with you
    and never will I leave this place of darkness
    ever again: I will stay here
    Surrounded by worms and death in this dark chamber,
    I will begin everlasting death here,
    and leave behind my unlucky fate
    Eyes, take your last glance!
    My arms embrace for the very last time! And lips,
    the doors of my breath, close with a kiss.
    Come, bitter future!
    You desperate pilot, we now run our ship into the rocks!
    Here’s to my love! [Drinks] Oh, honest apothecary!
    His drugs are quick to kill. I will die with a kiss. [Falls]

    In Romeo’s soliloquy, he says his final goodbyes to the world and makes his final apologies. He speaks about how hateful his death will be, calling it a “bitter conduct” yet, he still takes his life. He says that he is a pilot, taking his ship, or his life, and crashing it into rocks. He also apologizes to Tybalt. He believes he is doing Tybalt a favor by killing himself. He even calls Tybalt “cousin”, which is showing the love and respect he has, especially for Juliet. Her family is his. So, what is Shakespeare trying to convey? I believe that Shakespeare is trying to show that love triumphs hatred. No matter what has happened in the past, it all comes down to love. Romeo ends his life out of love.

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  3. josepha4

    O, my wife, death has sucked the sweet honey from you.
    But it doesn’t affect your beauty.
    You are not conquered.
    There is still red in your cheeks and lips
    that death has not reached.
    Tybalt is that you in your bloody sheet?
    What better can I do than kill myself with
    the hand that had killed you early.
    Use it to kill your enemy.
    Forgive me cousin!
    O Juliet why are you still so beautiful.
    Does death love you and he keeps you trapped.
    Because of that I will never leave.
    And this will be where I live.
    With worms as my company.
    Here, I will die.
    And leave my unlucky fate.
    Eyes take your last look.
    Arms take your last embrace.
    Oh, your lips are sealed with a kiss.
    Come now death.
    You desperate pilot run the ships into the rocks.
    Here is to my love. Oh honest apothecary.
    These drugs are quick. I will die with a kiss.

    There is one great difference between the play and the movie and that is that Paris never appears in the movie. Maybe Zeffirelli didn’t believe it was important or developed the story line by any great standard but I think he wanted to show Romeo to present Romeo in the most innocent and passionate way possible and having him kill another human would lead us to see him in a different perspective. Also, when Romeo decides to kill himself he knows it will be bad yet he attempts to show even his own death which is as gruesome as any person can think with a positive spin. He ponders if killing himself would make Tybalt happy and satisfied. Even though Romeo’s action is done for Tybalt he also does it for his love and that in some way is selfless.

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  4. stephaniec

    Oh my love! My wife!
    Death has sucked the sweetness of your breath:
    Your beauty has not been conquered; Beauty lies
    On your red lips and red cheeks,
    And death has not changed them
    Tybalt lies there dead, next to you, under a sheet?
    O, what can I do to repay you,
    But to use the hand of your killer
    To kill himself?
    Forgive me, my dear cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,
    Why are you still so fair? Should I believe
    That death is treating you well,
    And the monster of death keeps
    You in the dark to love you?
    For this fear, I will stay with you;
    And never leave you here alone
    Ever: here, here I will remain
    With the worms that live here; O, here
    Will I set up for my death,
    And shake up my unlucky fate
    that has troubled me. Eyes, take your last look!
    Arms, embrace for the last time! and, lips, O you
    The doors of breath, seal with a kiss
    The death I have claimed for myself
    You desperate pilot, now at once run on
    The dashing rocks!
    Here’s to my love![Drinks.] O true apothecary!
    These drugs are quick. And with a kiss I die. [Falls]

    One of the major differences I noticed between the movie and the written play is the fighting scene between Paris and Romeo. This was important to the plot, because it displayed dramatic irony. Paris fought Romeo because he felt Juliet’s death was because of Tybalt’s death. Furthermore, Romeo was a Montague, which was enough reason to engage in a duel. However, all of us readers know that Romeo and Juliet were married, and that Paris was planning on marrying Juliet too. If Paris had known, Paris would have good reason to want to fight Romeo. Essentially, Juliet’s two lovers were in a duel over her, both thinking she was dead.

    In Romeo’s soliloquy he mentions that he is going to pilot his own ship and crash into the rocks. This means that Romeo is going to take control of his own fate and kill himself to be with his one true love Juliet. At this moment, Romeo knows what he is doing and knows that it will be painful, but decides to do it anyway. This is also dramatic irony because as we all know, Juliet wasn’t actually dead.

    Reply
  5. Hannah M.

    Oh, my love! My wife!
    Death has taken away you sweet breath
    but it has not stolen your envious beauty
    You are not yet conquered, there is still
    red that shows in your lips and cheeks
    Death hasn’t made them pale yet
    Tybalt, do you lie there in your bloody sheet?
    What do I owe you,
    with my hand that ceased your life so young,
    to take the life of your enemy
    Forgive me, cousin! My dear, Juliet!
    Why does beauty still shine through you? Should I believe
    that this horrible death loves you?
    And he keeps you here,
    to be his lover
    Because of that frightening idea, I will stay with you
    and never will I exit this dark, fearful place
    ever again: I will stay here
    Surrounded by worms and death in this dark chamber,
    I will begin a death everlasting here,
    and leave behind my unlucky fate
    Eyes, take your last glance!
    My arms embrace for the very last time! And lips,
    the doors of my breath, shut with a kiss.
    Come, fearful future!
    You wantful pilot, are ship is run into the rocks!
    Here’s to my love! [Drinks] Oh, honest apothecary!
    His drugs are quick to cease one. I will die with a kiss. [Falls]

    In Romeos speech he is saying his goodbyes to the love of his life, Juliet. As we know he has no idea Juliet will soon wakeup for she is not actually dead. Romeo does not know this so he believes she is dead. Romeo cant stand the thought of a life without her so he decides to be with her in heaven and he took his own life for her.

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  6. Kate Ma.

    My love! My wife!
    The sweetness has been removed from your breath by death
    You had no power with that beauty
    Your beauty hasn’t gone away, it is still there
    And there is still red in your lips and cheeks
    And death’s effect has not gone there
    Is that Tybalt who lies in that grave?
    Oh, what can I do to favor you
    I killed you with my hand
    When I thought you were my enemy
    Forgive me cousin! Dear Juliet,
    How are you still so beautiful
    I believe that death is loved
    By that hated monster who keeps
    You here, in the dark, as his trophy?
    He fears that I will still stay with you
    And I will never leave this
    Place of darkness. I will stay here
    With the worms that are our maids.
    I will set up my forever home
    And screw up those unpleasant stars
    From this worn-down flesh: Look at those eyes!
    Those arms will take this last hug, and those lips
    Will be sealed off after this final kiss
    A bargain lasting forever is death
    Come, bitter conduct, come unsavoury guide!
    My desperate hero, now has crashed
    The sharp rocks on the bark
    This is for you! True apothecary!
    These drugs are good. After this kiss, I die.

    Shakespeare used many metaphors, comparisons and references. One particular metaphor that was interesting was when Romeo compared himself to a pilot. After working so hard and long, Romeo has given up and will end his life. This hints at the amount of pain Romeo must be feeling. Even with Juliet dead, Romeo still feels a need to protect her. Romeo discussed how Juliet was so beautiful, he believes death wants to keep her as a lover. Afterword, Romeo said he will stay with Juliet forever to protect her. Romeo literally lived for Juliet and never wanted to be separated from her. Since he believes she is now dead, Romeo wishes to meet her in an afterlife. There were major differences in the play and the movie. I noticed that in the play it ended a lot more romantic. For example, in the movie Romeo and Juliet die together peacefully yet in the book, there’s many people and it’s very chaotic when Romeo dies which takes away from the romance.

    Reply
  7. Sunna

    Oh, my love! My wife!
    Death has taken your sweetness away,
    It did not change your beauty
    You have not been conquered;
    It is crimson on your lips and on your cheeks
    And death has not taken that over yet
    Does Tybalt lie there in his bloody sheet?
    Oh, what more can I do for you?
    Than what I have done
    To kill him?
    Forgive me, cousin? Oh, dear Juliet,
    Why are you so beautiful? Should I believe
    That death keeps you trapped
    Here in the dark with him?
    For fear that I will stay
    And never from this palace
    Leave here, I will remain here
    With worms, oh here
    Will I die here
    And leave my fate
    Eyes, take in your last sight!
    Arms, hug for the last time! and lips, oh you
    Take your last breath with a kiss
    Come, bitter future!
    I am desperate, but I run on
    Here’s to my love! Oh, true poison!
    The drug are fast. So with a kiss I die

    In the movie version of Romeo and Juliet, it does not include Paris. I believe that the director wanted Romeo to be portrayed as an unproblematic hero. If they had him kill Paris like he did in the book, that may take away a part of that innocent, romantic lover. They wanted a scene with Romeo and Juliet, very romantic and simple.

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  8. Madi R.

    Oh my love! My wife!
    Death, has taken the honey from your breath,
    But it has not yet stolen your beauty:
    You are not conquered; There is still beauty
    In your red lips and cheeks,
    Death has not yet made you pale.
    Tybalt, are you lying there in a bloody mess?
    Is there a favor I can still do for you,
    It is with my hand that I killed you
    That was my enemy?
    Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,
    Why are you so fair? Should I believe
    That death is in love with you,
    And that the monster keeps you
    here in the dark to be his wife?
    Just because of that fear, I will stay with you;
    And I will never leave this dark place
    Ever again: here, here I will remain
    With the worms that are your chamber maids; oh, here
    Is where I will die,
    And forget all the things that have troubled me
    From this world. Eyes look for the last time,
    Arms take your last embrace! And lips, oh, you
    Are the doors of my breath, seal your fate with a kiss
    A bargain to dateless death!
    Come, bitter poison, come you unsavory guide to death!
    You a desperate pilot, let’s crash this ship into the rocks!
    Here’s to my love! [He drinks]
    Oh that apothecary was not lying!
    His drugs are quick. So, I will die with one last kiss.

    In Romeo’s soliloquy, he uses numerous metaphors, references and comparisons that help the reader to understand his anguish. Romeo compares Juliet’s beauty to different colors and objects. This helps the reader to understand how hard it is for Romeo to see her dead. Additionally, Romeo compares death to a pilot steering him into rocks, this represents a description of Romeo’s death. Shakespeare is also giving different meanings of life and death to his audience. I think that Shakespeare is trying to convey that life and death are linked and that love always has a big impact on both life and death. Romeo and Juliet both love each other so much that they want to be together in life and death.

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  9. Zoe

    O, my love! O, my wife!
    The death that has taken the sweetness of your breath,
    has not changed your beauty.
    You are not conquered; you still have beauty
    in your deep red lips and cheeks,
    and death has not yet captured you.
    Tybalt, do you lie underneath a bloody sheet?
    O, what can better thing to do to repay you,
    then to use the same hands that killed you
    to also kill your enemy?
    Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet.
    How are you so fair?
    Should I believe that death is in love with you,
    and that horrible monster keeps you
    in this paramour.
    Because I’m afraid of this, I will lie here with thee,
    and never will I leave from this place. Here will I stay,
    with worms as maids; O here will I
    sleep forever.
    And shake the unpromising stars,
    from my horrible flesh. Eyes, look at her for the last time.
    Arms take your last embrace. And lips you shall have your final kiss.
    And I shall finish the deal I have with death.
    Come horrible poison, come unsavory guide.
    You desperate pilot, run on now because your
    boat has crashed into rocks.
    Here’s to my love! O, apothecary!
    The poison is quick, so with a kiss, I die.

    When Romeo says his big speech towards Juliet, he prepares to kill himself. He removes himself from the social world by killing himself to be with Juliet for what he thought would be forever. During his soliloquy, he creates death as if it were a person and has interacted with his wife. Just as Capulet did, he talks about how death longs to be with her and has kept her hidden away in the dark room they are in now. “That unsubstantial death is amorous, And that the lean abhorred monster keeps thee here in dark to be his paramour?” He also talks about killing Tybalt and how he wants to repay the favor by killing his enemy or himself. He kills himself to be with Juliet and to repay Tybalt, so really he is killing himself to get rid of the pain and guilt he is going through. This is the reason why I think he killed himself for the wrong reasons. He was filled with hate for himself rather than love for Juliet when he died, which is the wrong way to go. This speech is incredibly emotional and very important to the story.

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  10. maxwellw

    O, my love! my wife!
    Death has sucked the honey from your breath, but it has not yet ruined your beauty
    You haven’t been conquered.
    Death has not yet turned them pale.
    Tybalt, are you lying there in your bloody death shroud? Oh, what better favor can I do for you than to kill the man who killed you with the same hand that made you die young.
    Forgive me, cousin!
    Ah, dear Juliet,
    Ah, dear Juliet, why are you still so beautiful? Should I believe that death is in love with you and that the awful monster keeps
    you here to be his mistress?
    For fear of that, I still will stay with you;
    And never from this palace of dim night
    Depart again: here, here will I remain
    With worms that are thy chamber-maids; O, here
    Will I set up my death,
    And shake the struggles of life
    From this weathered flesh. Eyes, look your last!
    Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O you
    The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss
    A dateless bargain to engrossing death!
    Come, bitter poison, come, unsavory guide! You desperate pilot, let’s crash this sea-weary ship into the rocks! Here’s to my love!
    ROMEO drinks the poison.
    Oh, that pharmacist was honest! His drugs work quickly. So I die with a kiss.

    Throughout Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare has held up the possibility of suicide as an inherent aspect of intense love. Passion cannot be stifled, and when combined with the impulsivity of youth, it expresses itself through the most convenient outlet. Romeo and Juliet long to live for love or die for it. Shakespeare seems to consider this suicidal impulse not as something separate from love, but rather as an element as much a part of it as the romance of Act 2. As such, the double suicide represents both the fulfillment of their love for each other and the self-destructive impulse that has surged beneath their love for the duration of the play.

    Reply
  11. Emma Garbowitz

    Oh, my love! my wife!
    Death, that had sucked the sweetness from your breath,
    But has no effect on your beauty:
    You are not conquered; and you still are beautiful
    Your lips and cheeks are both still red,
    It does not look like you have died yet.
    Tybalt, is that you lying there under that bloody sheet?
    Oh, what more can I do for you,
    Than with that hand, that separated my childhood in two
    To split apart me that was your enemy?
    Please, forgive me cousin! Oh, dear Juliet,
    Why are you so pretty? Should I believe
    That such unrealistic death is present,
    And that the rude, awful monster (Death) keeps
    You here in the dark to be his lover?
    Because I am worried about that, I will stay here with you;
    And never leave from this tomb of darkness
    Separate again: here, this is where I will stay
    With worms that clean your chamber; Oh, here
    I will prepare myself to die,
    And disturb the untrustworthy stars
    From this world fun of people. Eyes look at her for your final time!
    Arms, hold her for the last time! and, lips, O you
    They way air is breathed, end your life with a beautiful kiss
    A timeless event to my never-ending death!
    Come poison, lead me to my death!
    You desperate pilot, go on at once
    through the dangerous rocks and big waves
    this is from my love. O apothecary!
    These drugs are quick. Therefore, with a kiss I die.

    During Romeo’s soliloquy, he compares many things at the same time. One example of a comparison Shakespeare made during this speech was the idea of pale and color (more specifically red). Romeo sees the rosiness in Juliet’s cheeks and lips even though she is dead. Usually when someone dies, they lose all color in their face, including their cheeks and lips. Although the reader knows at this point that Juliet is not yet dead, and that she used the potion from the Friar to make her look dead, Romeo knows none of this information. This is why I found it odd that Romeo compared color to death and not paleness to death. It is an weird idea and goes along with the bigger comparison of life and death. Obviously, this was the main topic of the soliloquy and was the idea Shakespeare was trying to apply.
    At the same time, along with the idea of color and paleness, I came up with the idea of the theme, things may not always be as they seem. Juliet is dead but looks lifelike which means that something is different or odd about this death. She seemed much more lifelike than all the other corpses in the tomb. Sometimes, you have to look deeper into the situation before making a hasty decision, like Romeo did when he killed himself. If he calmed down and waited to see the Friar, everything could’ve been prevented and Romeo and Juliet could’ve lived happily together. Therefore, a reoccurring theme throughout the play was things may not always be as they seem and you may have to look deeper into the situation to be able to solve your problems.

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  12. johnh1

    O my love! my wife!
    You may be dead
    yet you still have beauty
    You are not conquered; you still have beauty
    You have red in your cheeks and lips
    and they are not pale there
    Tybalt, do you lie dead there?
    What more of a favor could I do for you
    I killed you
    when I thought you were against me
    Forgive me, cousin! Juliet
    Why art thou yet so fair? shall I believe
    That your death loves you,
    And that the hated monster keeps
    you here in dark to be his lover
    For fear of that, I will stay with you
    And never from this palace of darkness
    i will stay: here will I remain
    With worms that are your chamber-maids; O, here
    Will I set up my everlasting sleep,
    And never see the light again
    From this sad flesh. Eyes, see your final look!
    Arms, take your last hug! and, lips, O you
    The doors of breath, end with a righteous kiss
    An endless state, death!
    Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide!
    Your desperate hero has failed
    The rocks, the sea-sick bark!
    Here’s to my love! [Drinks.] O true apothecary!
    Your poison is quick. Thus with a kiss I die. [Falls.]

    He describes everything he is doing. Savoring the last moments of his life. The scene is drawn out . There is a point when he says
    “Eyes, look your last!
    Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O you
    The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss
    A dateless bargain to engrossing death!”

    This is drawn out and shows the somber nature of the scene. He is making sure he does the things he would want to, before he ends his life. He is saying goodbye to the world and opening up his afterlife so he can be with Juliet. It shows how much they love each other as well. Romeo is clearly upset hear and yet still dies to be with her.

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  13. jane

    My love! My wife!
    Death, that has taken your sweetness, cannot take your beauty:
    You are still beautiful, with your red lips and cheeks,
    Your face isn’t deadly pale yet.
    Tybalt’s body lies under that sheet?
    Oh, what favor can I do for you,
    I killed you, and you were my enemy.
    Forgive me! Dear Juliet,
    Why are you so beautiful? Should I think that your data loves you,
    And that the monster keeps you to be its love?
    I’m afraid of that and will stay with you;
    And never leave this dark place, I will remain here
    With worms here, here I will rest forever, and never see light from this world.
    Eyes, look for the last time!
    Arms, hug for the last time! And lips, die with a righteous kiss, a bargain worth dying for!
    I am ready to face the unpleasant poison!
    Lead through dangerous rocks and waves! This is to my love! [Drinks] Oh apothecary!
    The poison works fast. With a kiss I die. [Falls.]

    Romeo sees Juliet’s body, and decides to kill himself so he can be with her. In his final speech, he talks about the beauty of his wife, even though she is “dead”. He decides that life is pointless without Juliet, and that he would much rather die than have to live in a world without her. He easily says goodbye to the world, and drinks the poison. I’m surprised that there wasn’t much hesitation and that Romeo was so willing to die. He clearly loves Juliet very much, but I didn’t think he would so willingly die. Instead of maybe saying goodbye to his friends and family, or waiting a day or two to drink the poison he quickly drinks it and falls next to Juliet.

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  14. Mikayla Friedman

    Oh my love, my wife,
    Death has taken away your breath,
    But it has no effect on your beauty.
    You haven’t been conquered. Beauty is in
    The redness in your lips and in your cheeks,
    The paleness of death has not reached you there.
    Tybalt, is that you in that bloody sheet?
    Oh, what more can I do for you
    With my own hand, the hand that ended your life to young
    You were my enemy, and I will end my life with my own hand.
    Forgive me, cousin. Dear Juliet,
    Why are you still so beautiful? Should I think
    That death loves you,
    And that the monster of death keeps
    Hold of you and your beauty for himself?
    I fear this, so I will stay with you
    And I will never leave this place of night again.
    Here, here I will stay
    With the worms that are your maids. Here
    I will rest forever
    And I will never see the stars again in
    My wearied body. Eyes, look at your last sight.
    Arms, feel your last embrace. And lips, Oh
    The gate for breath, take your last kiss
    A small triumph in exchange for death.
    Come, bitter poison guide!
    Desperate pilot, lead me through
    The rocks and the journey that will make me sick!
    Here’s to my love. Honest apothecary,
    Your drugs work quickly. Thus with a kiss I die.

    In his last soliloquy, Romeo uses numerous metaphors and comparisons. For example, Romeo says Juliet’s breath is like honey and that her cheeks and lips are red, not pale. He also compared death to a monster and Juliet’s maids in the vault to worms. Romeo’s (or Shakespeare) use of figurative language demonstrated his anguish at seeing Juliet dead. He doesn’t even hesitate to drink the poison, all he can think about is being with Juliet again, which means both of them being dead. When Romeo says Juliet is still beautiful, even though she is dead, this showed me, for the final time, that Romeo doesn’t solely love Juliet for her looks only. He sees her true beauty, because clearly she must not look so great if she is dead. I think Shakespeare is conveying that death cannot prevent true love and with that, life. Romeo loves Juliet so greatly (even though she is now dead) that he kills himself just to be with her again, and when Juliet wakes up and finds Romeo dead, she does the same.

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  15. Mylesn

    Oh, my love! My wife!
    Death, that has taken the life from your lips,
    That had no power on your beauty:
    You are not defeated; beauty’s is still there
    Your lips and cheeks are still red
    and you still have not turned pale.
    Tybalt, do you lie in that bloody sheet?
    Oh , what could I do for you?
    With the hand that cut your life short
    When you were my enemy
    Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,
    Why are you so beautiful? shall I believe
    that death embraces you,
    and the monster of death wants
    you here as his love
    For fear of that, I still will stay with you;
    And never from this place of darkness
    leave again: here, here will I stay
    With worms that are your chamber-maids; Oh, here
    Will I set up my forever rest,
    And jostle the world’s balance
    From this body, take your last look
    Arms, take your last hug! and, lips, Oh you
    The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss
    A dateless deal to take on death!
    Come, bitter death, come, unwanted guide!
    Your desperate plan has failed
    The rocks thy sea worn bark!
    Here’s to my love! Oh true poison!
    Your drugs are quick. And I die with this kiss

    Romeo receives the notice from Balthazar that his wife has died. When he hears this news he buys poison so he can join his wife in death. He would rather be dead than to live in a world with his Juliet. His final moments are him taking his last embraces of Juliet. He does not say good bye to anyone but Juliet. Both lovers were willing to die for each other and that they did.

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  16. trinityt

    Oh my love, my wife!
    Even though death has took away the honey from your breath,
    It has not yet the power to take away your beauty.
    You are not conquered. A beautiful banner yet
    Still has red on your lips and your cheeks,
    And death’s paleness is not there yet.-
    Tybalt, are you lying there in your bloody shroud?
    Oh, what greater favor can I do to you
    Than with the hand that killed your youth
    To kill Romeo that was your enemy?
    Forgive me, cousin.-Ah, dear Juliet,
    Why are you so beautiful? Should I believe
    That death is in love with you,
    And that the horrible monster keeps
    You in the dark here to be his lover?
    For that fear I always will stay with you
    And never from this dark place
    Leave again. I will remain here
    With the worms that are your chambermaids. Oh, here
    I will rest here forever
    And shake off the bad fortunes
    From my body! Eyes, see for the last time.
    Arms, make your last embrace. And, lips, oh, you
    The doors of breath, seal with a kiss
    A deal with death.
    Come, bitter guide, come, unsavory poison!
    You desperate pilot, now crash into
    The rocks with your seasick weary ship!
    Here’s to my love. Oh true pharmacist,
    Your drugs are quick. With a kiss I die.

    One major difference between the Zeferelli’s movie and the written play of Romeo and Juliet is the fight scene between Paris and Romeo. As we all know, there was a fight scene between Paris and Romeo in the written play, but there was no fight scene between them in the movie. I think that Zeferelli was trying to make Romeo innocent in his last moment before he kills himself with drinking the poison. I also think it is to show the innocent and romantic, and without bloodshed scene with Romeo and Juliet one last time before they both actually died, because they died as a pair of lovers, and the air around them when they’re together are always peaceful before.

    In Romeo’s final speech, he talks about how beautiful Juliet, his wife, is even when she’s “dead”, so beautiful that even death is in love with her and that the monster wants to make her his lover. Romeo said that’s the reason why he would stay with her forever. He doesn’t want his Juliet to be taken away from him again so he chooses to died with her so that he’ll be with her forever in death. Romeo can’t live his life without Juliet, and Juliet can’t live her life without Romeo, so in the end, they both died and be together forever in their afterlife.

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  17. caseyz

    Oh, wife! You’re dead!
    You’re still beautiful though
    You even look alive
    There’s Tybalt
    I’m sorry that I killed you,
    Please forgive me cousin!
    Juliet you are so beautiful!
    Why did you have to die?
    I love you,
    I will stay with you even if we are surrounded by worms
    You are the last person I will ever hug and kiss and see.
    I have failed,
    Come unsavory poison!
    I’m doing this because I love you
    I will die quickly, and I will die with a kiss.

    This speech shows how much Romeo loves Juliet and how impulsive he is. This is the scene where Romeo kills himself because he finds out that Juliet is “dead”. Romeo finally did what he said he was willing to do in the beginning of the book. He told Juliet that he was willing to die for her, and as we saw in this scene, he was serious and actually took his own life. This scene also shows how impulsive Romeo is. When Balthazar told him Juliet was dead, instead of questioning his accuracy in this situation, he immediately went to Juliet with poison. Once he got to Juliet, he killed himself in what seemed like a matter of minutes. If Romeo would have waited a little longer, the frier would have got there and explained everything to him.

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  18. Hannah Pitkofsky

    O my love! my wife!
    Death has removed the color from your lips,
    But that is nothing compared to your overall love and beauty
    You are not conquered, Beauty still remains
    In the red of your cheeks and your lips
    For death has not reached there yet
    Tybalt, you now lie there upon your bloody sheets?
    Oh, what more can I do for you
    But my hand has killed you and your youth
    Should I surrender to my enemy?
    Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,
    Why are you so beautiful? Should I believe that, even though you have died, that you are still beautiful
    And that the monster we call Death shall not take away the beauty that you behold
    For I scared of losing you, I will stay with you
    And never leave your side
    If I have to leave shortly, I will return
    With worms that are thy chamber-maids; O, here
    I will lay forever
    And shake off the bad fortunes
    From my body. You have my last sight, last embrace and my last kiss.
    Come, Death, let me be with my Juliet!
    Your desperate pilot, now crashes into the rocks of the shore
    Here’s to my love! [Drinks.] O true pharmacist!
    Thy drugs are quick. Now I will die with a kiss.

    Before Romeo’s ultimate death, he explains his love with Juliet as well as the feud he had with Tybalt. He is commenting on the fact that he HAS wronged and that he understands that he has done some things that are wrong throughout his life and he is reflecting back before he dies. One interesting thing to note is that he killed himself to be with Juliet, even though she wasn’t actually dead. He killed himself for no reason until Juliet later wakes up and finds Romeo dead and kills herself, allowing the two to be together once again.

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  19. Sophie

    Oh my love! My wife!
    Death has taken away the sweetness of your breath,
    But nothing can take away your beauty.
    Your beauty will never be taken away, it still lies within your lips and your cheeks
    Death hasn’t reached them yet!
    Tybalt, is that you under the bloody sheet?
    Oh what do I owe you, for I am the one that killed you!
    I was your enemy, but forgive me cousin!
    Ah dear Juliet,
    Why are you so beautiful, should I believe
    That death took you to be imprisoned by a monster?
    If that is the case, then I will stay with you
    And never leave you
    Surrounded by worms and dead people
    Oh here I will kill myself
    And leave my misfortunes behind
    My last look in your eyes
    Our last embrace, and oh
    Let me leave with one, perfect, kiss
    Come face me death!
    Let me drink this poison
    Like an urgent pilot crashing into piles of rocks
    Here’s to my wife! [Drinks] Oh the drugs work!
    They work so fast. Finally, with a kiss, I die. [Falls]

    In Romeo’s soliloquy, Shakespeare used a lot of literary elements to make his speech a powerful and dramatic way to end Romeo’s life. The first element I noticed was personification. Shakespeare portrayed death as a living thing. “Death, that hath suck’d the honey of thy breath”. He said that death took away Juliet’s physical qualities and sucked the breath out from inside of her. It also said that death tried to stake it’s flag upon Juliet, like it is claiming her. Furthermore, death was portrayed to be capturing Juliet to be given to an “abhorring monster”! Another thing I noticed was metaphorically comparing the crashing pilot to Romeo’s life. The fact that a pilot was landing into piles of rocks just proves Shakespeare’s ongoing theme of tragedy. When I think of crashing pilots, I imagine the pilots having no more hope. Almost like giving up on life. This is totally what Romeo was feeling – hopeless. Which obviously resulted in suicide. The final message of crashing planes brought the story full circle in a way. The entire play, Romeo has lived his life either off of impulsive and bad decisions, or unluckiness. Usually when a plane crashes, it is because the pilot made a dumb mistake, or something went wrong – which is always very unlucky. Romeo’s misfortunes and bad decisions all led up to this final moment – the crashing plane and the suicide. Overall a very tragic ending.

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  20. Maddie

    Oh my love! My wife!
    You have died!
    But death does not effect your beauty
    Beauty is still in you
    Death has not fully overtaken you.
    Tybalt, is that you?
    Is there a better favor than to kill myself who had killed you?
    Forgive me Tybalt! Oh, Juliet!
    Why are you so beautiful?
    Should I believe that death is loving?
    And that the devil keeps you here to love you?
    I’m afraid of that, so I will stay with you.
    I will stay here forever and never leave.
    And dim the stars from the world.
    I take one last look at you, hug you once more. and kiss you for the last time.
    Come, death! You are welcome.
    This is for my love. Oh Apothecary!
    These drugs work quickly. I will die with a kiss.

    Throughout Romeo’s last speech, he talks a lot about how Juliet is still beautiful even though she is dead. He seems to only care about her beauty and not her true personality. He doesn’t seem to miss her, he only misses her appearance. This gives us new insight about the real reason Romeo loved Juliet. I also noticed that the scene in the book is very similar to the one in the movie, and though many scenes were changed, this one was pretty much left alone. This might be because the scene was so important to the plot and truly showed the reason for Romeo’s misery.

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  21. Brishti

    Oh my love! my wife!
    Death has taken away the sweetness of your breath,
    But it has not touched your beauty:
    Nothing can take away your beauty
    Your lips and cheeks are red,
    Death has not made you pale there.
    Tybalt do you lie there under that bloody sheet?
    Oh, is there a better favor I can do,
    Than with the hand that ended your life short
    To kill your murderer?
    Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,
    Why are you still so pretty? Should I believe
    That Death loves you,
    And that the monster keeps
    You here to be his lover?
    To make sure that doesn’t happen, I will stay here with you;
    And never from this tomb
    Leave: I will stay here
    With the worms that are your chambermaids; Oh, here
    I will rest forever,
    And get rid of the unpromising luck
    That wears down my body. Eyes, see for the last time!
    Arms, make the last embrace! and, lips,
    That allow me to breathe, stop with a final kiss
    An everlasting deal I have made with death!
    Come, death, you unpleasant guide!
    You desperate pilot, now crash into
    The rocks with your seasick and weary ship!
    Here’s to my love! [Drinks.] Oh honest apothecary!
    Your drugs work fast. Now, I die with a kiss. [Falls.]

    In Romeo’s final soliliquy, he talks of Juliet’s beauty and how death has untouched her. In his final sentences, he talks of how he will join her in death, as he drinks the poison that he bought from the apothecary. Shakespeare uses several comparisons to show the anguish that Romeo was feeling. The first thing I noticed was how much Romeo personified death. He is shown to view death as a villain. Romeo tells Juliet’s dead body that death “Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty”. While we know that Juliet is not truly dead, Romeo doesn’t. He thinks that death is like a criminal who will steal Juliet’s beauty from her. Then, he ponders if “unsubstantial death is amorous”. He questions if death actually loves Juliet and takes her away from Romeo because he wants her to be his lover. This comparison is interesting because it can take on two different meanings: on one hand, Romeo is connected to Juliet and loves her so much that he wants to stay with her forever. On the other hand, it can mean that he is being irrational and frustrated and makes rash decisions because his emotions are interfering with his reason. In class, we briefly talked about how most protagonists in Shakespeare’s tragedies have fatal flaws which lead to their demise. This makes me wonder if that trait is Romeo’s fatal flaw, because this is not the first time his emotion clouds his judgement. Romeo goes on to compares death to a villain by referencing to “A dateless bargain to engrossing death!”. This is a reference to fate, and the idea that everyone has a set date to die. Romeo thinks that now is his time to pass, and that he needs to fufill that promise with a final kiss. The final thing Romeo compares death to is an “unsavory guide”. Up until now, Romeo has regarded death as a villain who is keeping Juliet away from him. But now, he views death as a guide, or a pilot that will crash into the rocks in the sea. This reminded me of greek mythology, where Charon was the ferryman who transported dead souls across the River Styx to Hades. Shakespeare is showing that death can come in many different forms, and that Romeo’s many comparisons show how gravely he misinterpreted death; he was choosing to face all of the dark forms it can take all because of love. Romeo’s impulsiveness to go into the unknown without fully understanding what happens next is ultimately the thing that makes this play a tragedy.

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  22. Emily

    My love! My wife!
    Death stole your sweetness ,
    But it is powerless against your beauty
    you have red lips and cheeks,
    Death hasn’t made you pale yet.
    Tybalt lays there under the bloody sheet?
    Oh, what can I do for you,
    I killed you,because you were my enemy?
    Forgive me, my cousin!
    Ah, my dear Juliet,
    Why are you so beautiful?
    Can I believe that death is good for you,
    and the monster keeps you here in the dark to be its love?
    Since I fear that, I will stay with you
    And never leave this dark place
    Here I will stay, with worms that are maids,
    Here I will stay in everlasting sleep
    Eyes look at your last sight!
    Arms, take your last embrace!
    And lips, die with a kiss
    Come on death!
    You are the pilot, now run at the rocks of the sea!!
    Here is to my love! [Drinks.]
    The drugs work quick and so I will die with a kiss. [Falls.]

    In Romeo’s soliloquy, he states his regret for killing Tybalt and how he is ready for death. Most people would be regretful about killing themselves, but Romeo is ready. He wants to be with his one true love and death is his way to be with her. When Rome says, “Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide!Thou desperate pilot, now at once run on the dashing rocks thy sea-sick weary bark!” he means that death is in charge of him now, and that his time is over. Romeo’s final words show how he is still impulsive and blinded by love. His fatal flaw is that he can not look past his love and see that their is still so much life for him to live. Since Romeo does not have a close relationship with his parents, and he is too blind to see that other people, like the friar, care about him; he thinks that Juliet is all he has. Without her, he can not go on. Shakespeare is showing the audience how Romeo’s youth lead to his impulse to be blinded by his love for a women he has just me. Ultimately, this flaw lead to his demise and pain for everyone.

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