March 19

Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?

Tonight, please read Act III, scene ii, and then analyze Juliet’s transformation in the section of the text I have copied below.  Explain how Juliet changes over the course of this section of the text, provide specific textual evidence of that transformation, and — here’s the tricky part!– make sure you show how that text really demonstrates the change.

As always, please follow the rules of standard written English and respond to at least one other comment in this thread.

JULIET
O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!
Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?
Beautiful tyrant! fiend angelical!
Dove-feather’d raven! wolvish-ravening lamb!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st,
A damned saint, an honourable villain!
O nature, what hadst thou to do in hell,
When thou didst bower the spirit of a fiend
In moral paradise of such sweet flesh?
Was ever book containing such vile matter
So fairly bound? O that deceit should dwell
In such a gorgeous palace!

Nurse
There’s no trust,
No faith, no honesty in men; all perjured,
All forsworn, all naught, all dissemblers.
Ah, where’s my man? give me some aqua vitae:
These griefs, these woes, these sorrows make me old.
Shame come to Romeo!

JULIET
Blister’d be thy tongue
For such a wish! he was not born to shame:
Upon his brow shame is ashamed to sit;
For ’tis a throne where honour may be crown’d
Sole monarch of the universal earth.
O, what a beast was I to chide at him!

Nurse
Will you speak well of him that kill’d your cousin?

JULIET
Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?
Ah, poor my lord, what tongue shall smooth thy name,
When I, thy three-hours wife, have mangled it?
But, wherefore, villain, didst thou kill my cousin?
That villain cousin would have kill’d my husband:
Back, foolish tears, back to your native spring;
Your tributary drops belong to woe,
Which you, mistaking, offer up to joy.
My husband lives, that Tybalt would have slain;
And Tybalt’s dead, that would have slain my husband:
All this is comfort; wherefore weep I then?
Some word there was, worser than Tybalt’s death,
That murder’d me: I would forget it fain;
But, O, it presses to my memory,
Like damned guilty deeds to sinners’ minds:
‘Tybalt is dead, and Romeo–banished;’
That ‘banished,’ that one word ‘banished,’
Hath slain ten thousand Tybalts. Tybalt’s death
Was woe enough, if it had ended there:
Or, if sour woe delights in fellowship
And needly will be rank’d with other griefs,
Why follow’d not, when she said ‘Tybalt’s dead,’
Thy father, or thy mother, nay, or both,
Which modern lamentations might have moved?
But with a rear-ward following Tybalt’s death,
‘Romeo is banished,’ to speak that word,
Is father, mother, Tybalt, Romeo, Juliet,
All slain, all dead. ‘Romeo is banished!’
There is no end, no limit, measure, bound,
In that word’s death; no words can that woe sound.

R&J blog #14


Copyright © 2018. All rights reserved.

Posted March 19, 2019 by equinson in category Romeo and Juliet

29 thoughts on “Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?

  1. Kate

    Over the course of act three scene two, Juliet’s attitude of her husband changes dramatically. At first she’s devastated that Romeo killed her cousin Tybalt. Juliet portrays her anger towards Romeo as she talks poorly of him to the nurse. For instance, Juliet calls Romeo, “A damned saint, an honorable villain!” Juliet blames Romeo for Tybalts death. The nurse begins to trash talk Romeo as well, saying, “Shame come to Romeo!” At this, Juliet changes her views of Romeo. Juliet starts to take back what she had previously said about her husband and starts defending him. Juliet justifies Romeo’s actions by saying “But, wherefore, villain, didst thou kill my cousin?/That villain cousin would have kill’d my husband”. Juliet means that if Romeo hadn’t killed Tybalt, Tybalt would’ve ended up killing Romeo. The speed at which Juliet changes her mind and forgives Romeo shows how much she loves him. She cares for him so much that she essentially chooses him over her cousin. She even calls Tybalt a “villain cousin”. However, after Nurse asks Juliet why she is forgiving Romeo, Juliet says, “Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?”. This line is alarming because it makes it seem Juliet is blindly siding with Romeo because they are married. If Romeo wasn’t her husband, would she still forgive him?

    Reply
    1. Emma Garbowitz

      I agree that Juliet changed her opinion so quickly and that she turned on her cousin so quickly to side with Romeo.

      Reply
  2. Sunna

    From this reading, it is clear that Juliet’s mind changes rapidly. When she first hears of Tybalt’s death, she seems to be furious at Romeo. She says, “O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!”. She is calling Romeo distrustful, that the evil that lies within him was hidden was his good looks and charming persona. It seems that Juliet is no longer lost in her love for him, that she moves on quickly. However, after she processes the situation more, she says, “O, what a beast was I to chide at him!” Juliet seems to instantly regret the way that she jumped to conclusions about Romeo. I believe that Juliet does change her mind fairly often, but that Romeo isn’t someone that she could just move on from or forget. She may lose herself in her emotions every once in a while, but she does not seem like the type of person to despise someone without hearing them out. I think that Juliet will want to know what Romeo has to say, and that she will stay loyal to him, no matter what.

    Reply
  3. johnh1

    Juliet’s opinion changes extraordinarily quickly in this scene. She starts out talking about how Romeo is awful and he killed her cousin. Then the Nurse adds to it by insulting him. Immediately after this, Juliet tells her to shut up. She talks about how she was wrong and how Romeo is actually wonderful and how she loves him so much. She seems like she changes her mind for no reason, however, it is strange how as soon as the nurse speaks up she is insulting someone who is a saint. This seems to show Juliet’s state of mind. When she is insulting Romeo she is just getting anger out on her husband who she believes she loves a lot. However, when the nurse speaks up, she is not his husband and therefore is throwing insults. When Juliet sees how the Nurse is acting she dislikes it because “no one can talk about Romeo like that”. While she has anger towards him she doesn’t want others insulting who she loves because when she yells she knows she still loves him and must defend him.

    Reply
  4. Emma Garbowitz

    Over the course of Act III scene ii, Juliet’s opinion changed dramatically of Romeo from the beginning of her conversation with the nurse towards the end their conversation. At the beginning, Juliet was completely devastated that her new husband, Romeo killed her cousin Tybalt. She was almost in shock that Romeo would do something like this especially to her dearest cousin. Juliet was very angry and started talking slightly poorly about Romeo which makes sense in this situation. Hypothetically, if my husband were to kill my cousin I would be extremely upset and angry at him at the same time. However, as soon as Juliet’s nurse started talking poorly about Romeo, Juliet stuck up for him. I think she did this because she feels that her love is much stronger than her hate for what Romeo did. The text states, “Tybalt is dead, and Romeo–banished;’
    That ‘banished,’ that one word ‘banished,’
    Hath slain ten thousand Tybalts.
    This shows how much more Juliet cares about Romeo rather than Tybalt. Because she changed her mind so quickly, shows that Juliet loves Romeo so much. Furthermore, after she found out that Tybalt was slain by Romeo she was upset. But after she found out Romeo was banished Juliet would rather have Tybalt killed 10 times!
    I think that Juliet is like a moody teenager. One minute she had an poor opinion of Romeo and the next she was thinking the complete opposite. In a way she reminds me of teenagers in today’s world even though she is from medieval times. Teenagers today also change their opinions quickly based off of their impulsive thinking. Therefore, Juliet is changing and I think Romeo has a huge impact on her and the way she acts.

    Reply
  5. Laila

    In this scene, Juliet’s mind changes rapidly. When the nurse first tells Juliet the news of Tybalt’s death, Juliet places most of her anger on Romeo. She says, “Was ever book containing such vile matter so fairly bound? O that deceit should dwell In such a gorgeous palace!” This means Juliet is wondering how something so gorgeous, Romeo, could be so evil. Then, the nurse agrees with her, saying, “Shame come to Romeo!” In an instant, Juliet changes her mind. How could she have blamed Romeo for any of this? She instantly regrets ever speaking poorly of him. She states, “Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband? Ah, poor my lord, what tongue shall smooth thy name” She even proceeds to say that Romeo being banished is far worse than any death she could imagine. It shows who Juliet’s loyalty is shifting to. She values her husband, a man she met only a day ago, more than her very own family.

    Reply
  6. stephaniec

    In Act III scene ii, Juliet’s opinions on Romeo change dramatically. She changes from when she first hears that Romeo killed Tybalt all the way to the end of her conversation with nurse. For example, in the beginning when she first found out about the death of Tybalt, she was enraged. She was both angry at Romeo for killing Tybalt, while also grieving the death of her dear cousin. Juliet stated, “O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!”, meaning Romeo’s murderous heart was covered with a pretty face. However, once the Nurse agrees with her and takes her own stabs at Romeo’s character, Juliet changes. First, she says “Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?”. She then goes on to say, “But, wherefore, villain, didst thou kill my cousin? That villain cousin would have kill’d my husband:”, meaning that if Romeo hadn’t killed Tybalt, Romeo would most likely have been dead. By the end of the conversation, she forgives Romeo, so much to the point where she says she would rather have Tybalt killed 10 times, instead of having Romeo banned.

    Reply
  7. Mylesn

    In this scene Juliet’s mind over Romeo’s actions is like a roller coaster. She is at first ecstatic to hear news of her new husband from her nurse. “O, here comes my nurse and she brings news; and every tongue that speaks, but Romeo’s name speaks heavenly eloquence.” With the nurses reactions she is lead to believe that Romeo had killed himself and threatened to do the same. But the nurse soon make sit clear that Romeo did not kill himself, but had killed the cousin of Juliet, Tybalt. She curses Romeo and wonders how someone so beautiful could be so evil. Her speech about deception shows duality and opposites:

    “O serpent heart hid with a flowering face!
    Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?
    Beautiful tyrant, fiend angelical,
    Dove-feathered raven, wolvish-ravening lamb,
    Despised substance of divinest show,
    Just opposite to what thou justly seemest,
    A damned saint, an honourable villain.
    O nature, what hadst thou to do in hell
    When thou didst bower the spirit of a fiend
    In mortal paradise of such sweet flesh?
    Was ever book containing such vile matter
    So fairly bound? O that deceit should dwell
    In such a gorgeous palace!”

    Juliet’s feelings of Romeo are now at the bottom and then she suddenly has a change of heart. “O, what a beast was I to chide at him!…..Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband? Ah, poor my lord, what tongue shall smooth thy name, when I, thy three-hours wife, have mangled it?” She is grief-stricken from Tybalt’s death, but Romeo’s banishment hits her harder.

    Reply
  8. Maxwell Watson

    Juliet’s thoughts change ever so fast in this scene, as when she finds out of Tybalt she curses nature that it should put “the spirit of a fiend” in Romeo’s “sweet flesh”.. The Nurse echoes Juliet and curses Romeo’s name, but Juliet denounces her for criticizing her husband, and adds that she regrets faulting him herself. After criticizing Romeo for his role in Tybalt’s death, and hearing the Nurse malign Romeo’s name, Juliet regains control of herself and realizes that her loyalty must be to her husband rather than to Tybalt, her cousin. This moment is important for Juliet’s development because in a sense she’s resigned herself to being at Romeo’s side.

    Reply
  9. Sophie

    The aftermath of Mercutio, Tybalt, and Romeo’s fight was chaos, and Juliet certainly went through a whirlwind of emotions. Which by the way, is completely understandable being that she is 13 years old! First off, when Juliet and Nurse first witnessed Tybalt’s death, Juliet was shocked with an insane amount of grief and ended up blaming everything on Romeo.
    “Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st,
    A damned saint, an honourable villain!
    O nature, what hadst thou to do in hell,
    When thou didst bower the spirit of a fiend
    In moral paradise of such sweet flesh?”
    Juliet was shocked that her husband would ever do such a thing – kill his wives relative. Also she is mad because she thought that she trusted him. He agreed to love and support her, and I am assuming that he promised to love her family members too. Recently there was a scene with Romeo and Nurse in the church, and Romeo was extremely courteous and even gave Nurse money! However, once Juliet began to process the situation, her mindset changed. Instead of being upset with Romeo, she remembered the love that she felt for him and forgave him.
    “O, what a beast was I to chide at him!
    Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?
    Ah, poor my lord, what tongue shall smooth thy name,
    When I, thy three-hours wife, have mangled it?”
    Juliet felt remorse for being angry at her loved one. Here she re assures herself that Romeo is not a bad man. He is her treasured love, and she quickly forgets about any bad feelings she had for him. This whole situation is another example of how love can blind you. At first, Juliet was 100% not blinded and saw the situation the same way any random Capulet would see it. But then, after Juliet comes back to reality with her newly discovered love life, she is blinded again and acts as if her husband didn’t just murder her cousin.

    Reply
    1. caseyz

      I agree, Juliet is continuously being blinded by her love for Romeo. She doesn’t realize that Romeo was seeking revenge on Tybalt for Mercutio’s death.

      Reply
  10. Emily

    Throughout the play we experiance many changes in perspective, but perhaps the quickest and most dramatic is that of Juliet in Act III, scene ii. In this scene Juliet is notified by the nurse about Tybalt’s death and Romeo’s banishment. When she first receives the news, she is appalled that Romeo would have done something as horrible as killing her cousin. When Juliet says, “Was ever book containing such vile matter so fairly bound? O that deceit should dwell in such a gorgeous palace!” it exhibits her rage. She is saying that Romeo is beautiful and that she thought that he was an incredible person. However, after she knows of what he is capable of, she thinks that he is “vile matter”. It seems as if she would never trust him again, but this soon changes because she nears the end of her speech by stating that “And Tybalt’s dead, that would have slain my husband:All this is comfort; wherefore weep I then?” ALthough she does not yet know the whole story, Juliet thinks that if Romeo had not killed Tybalt then he would have killed him. She loves him so much, that she does not know how she would be able to mourn the death of someone would would kill the love of her life. The bond between Romeo and Juliet is so strong that Juliet loves Romeo even if all she knows is one biased side of a tragedy.

    Reply
  11. caseyz

    Juliet’s opinions on Romeo change rapidly throughout this scene. After the nurse tells her that her cousin, Tybalt, was killed by her own husband, Romeo, Juliet is in shock. She says,

    “O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!
    Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?
    Beautiful tyrant! fiend angelical!
    Dove-feather’d raven! wolvish-ravening lamb!”

    She is saying that she was tricked and who she thought was her sweet, caring husband was now a malicious murderer. She thinks that she was fooled by his looks while all along he was the horrible person who killed her cousin. As fast as she came to this conclusion, she changes her mind and now beloved that she’d much rather have Romeo over Tybalt. She says,

    “My husband lives, that Tybalt would have slain;
    And Tybalt’s dead, that would have slain my husband:”

    She’s saying that if Tybalt was going to kill Romeo, it’s better that Romeo killed Tybalt first. She would rather kill 10 Tybalts than have Romeo banished from Verona. She would rather be with her husband than let her own cousin live.

    Reply
  12. jane

    In act III scene ii, Juliet is put in the center of a significant dilemma. Her cousin, someone that she is related to by blood, had been killed by the love of her life, Romeo. She returns home, ecstatic to be married to Romeo and excited to see him again, when she hears that her cousin, Tybalt, has been killed. When she first is told the terrible news, she is angry at Romeo. She says, “O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?”. She is basically saying that a mean, evil person was hiding themselves in Romeo, appearing to be kind, loving, and handsome.

    After thinking the situation over, Juliet’s mindset changes. She stops blaming Romeo, because she says that if Romeo didn’t kill Tybalt, Tybalt would inevitably end up killing Romeo. She realizes that Tybalt dead or not, she can’t be happy like before. It would either be having a dead husband and a cocky cousin, or a dead cousin and banished Husband. I feel that this is really the moment that Juliet begins to understand her situation. She secretly married a Montague the day after she met him. She knows that there won’t be peace between the Montagues and Capulets, and if either of them ever reveal their secret marriage, there will surely be very severe reactions.

    Reply
  13. Brishti

    In Act III scene ii, we get a rapid change in emotions from Juliet upon word that Romeo has murdered her cousin. Before the Nurse arrives with the news, Juliet is extremely excited to see her husband. The mood dramatically changes quickly when the Nurse reveals the news of Tybalt’s murder and Romeo’s banishment to her. After that, Juliet has a completely different mindset. She now thinks of Romeo as being evil. She says: “O serpent heart hid with a flow’ring face! Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave!” In these lines, Juliet is saying that Romeo masked his evil with his beauty and his charm. She thinks of him as breaking her trust. Instead of being the charming young man he appeared to be, Juliet thinks that he was an evil murderer. This idea of him is soon changed when she thinks over the situation a bit more. She says: “O, what a beast was I to chide at him!” She then realizes that if Romeo had not killed Tybalt, then Tybalt would have killed Romeo. In the end, she puts her “love” over her own family.

    Reply
    1. Mikayla Friedman

      I didn’t even take into account that Juliet was happy and excited to see Romeo before the Nurse arrived. This means that her emotions changed twice, from being eager to see Romeo, to being mad at him, and then back to being protective of Romeo and loving him.

      Reply
  14. Zoe

    When Juliet speaks to the Nurse about Romeo and his horrible deed, she changes her opinion on him throughout it. In the beginning, she is completely shocked and disappointed in Romeo and how he killed Tybalt. She tells the nurse how he’s dishonorable now and the horrible deed he has done can’t be forgiven. “A damned saint, an honorable villain! O nature, what hadst thou to do in hell,” Although she is determined to think this of him, she remembers their love and when the nurse said he is shameful Juliet immediately replied how she cannot be against him because he is her husband. Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?” She then continues to go back and forth from wanting to hate him and knowing she can’t because she loves him. The text creates a long paragraph of her second-guessing herself ever and over again. Juliet expresses her long train of thought from hating Romeo to loving him and back again.

    Reply
  15. Madi R.

    Shakespeare portrays many changes in Juliet over the course of act iii scene ii. Juliet is angered by the news from the nurse that Romeo has killed Tybalt. The reader can feel Juliet’s emotional state from her words, “Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st. A damnèd saint, an honorable villain!” Juliet is claiming that Romeo has turned out the opposite of what he seemed. She is annoyed because she feels that Romeo hid behind another personality in her presence. Moreover, to Juliet he seemed to be a hero but has turned out to be a villain. Juliet suddenly changes her mind and decides that Romeo deserves honor. Juliet begins to believe that it was not right that she was angry with Romeo. She realizes that the two young men, one of which is her husband and the other her cousin, were both trying to take each other’s lives. Although her cousin is dead her husband is still alive. Juliet’s emotions definitely change drastically throughout this scene, which to the reader makes her character more realistic and like able.

    Reply
  16. Mikayla Friedman

    In act III scene ii Juliet changes over the course of a few short paragraphs. At first, when the Nurse tells Juliet that Romeo murdered Tybalt, she is outraged! She cannot believe that Romeo disguised his villainous character under a beautiful mask. Juliet goes on to say all of these contradicting ideas, such as: “A damnèd saint, an honorable villain.” This means he is a saint who should be worshipped because of his holiness, but he should also be damned. She also says: “Was ever book containing such vile matter / So fairly bound?” This comparison is asking if there was ever an evil book with a beautiful cover?
    The Nurse agrees with Juliet. She is grief-stricken by the death of Tybalt. She says: “There’s no trust,/ No faith, no honesty in men. All perjured, / All forsworn, all naught, all dissemblers.” She is saying that men aren’t trustworthy, faithful, or honest. They are all evil and deceivers. The Nurse then says “Shame come to Romeo,” and then we see Juliet change.

    Even though Juliet just proclaimed Romeo a horrible monster behind the face of a beautiful man, she now defends him when the Nurse says shame on Romeo! In response to the Nurse, Juliet says, “Blistered be thy tongue / For such a wish!” Juliet just told the Nurse that she should have blisters on her tongue for saying shame on Romeo. Juliet also says, “Oh, what a beast was I to chide at him!” She just took back all of the horrible things she said about Romeo, and now she is defending him because they are married! Juliet realized that she cannot be angry with a man she has just been married to, and that it is her duty to defend him. I think she just realized what Romeo’s banishment means, and she says that Romeo being banished is like her father, mother, Tybalt, Romeo, and herself all being dead.
    Juliet changed her mind very quickly, but ultimately she sided with Romeo. This goes to show how much she loves him, and what she would do for him. Both Romeo and Juliet have proven their love for each other, so I am no longer sceptical of their love and marriage. Clearly, they would die for each other (which they do), and they really do love each other.

    Reply
  17. angelicac1

    In Act III, scene ii of Romeo and Juliet, readers witness Juliet go through a change as she goes from wishing nothing but bad things on Romeo when she heard the news that he killed her cousin, to countering her previous statements by stating the opposite. On page 135, Juliet speaks of Romeo by saying, “O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face! Did ever a dragon keep so fair a cave?” Juliet continues to speak of Romeo by comparing him to a beautiful tyrant and a dove feathered raven. What Juliet is doing is trying to figure out her thoughts about Romeo. She is so full of fury and aggravation towards Romeo because of his actions yet she still loves him in a bittersweet way. The nurse agrees with Juliet’s words and states that with men there is no honesty and how she wishes shame upon him, but Juliet’s mood changes and targets her frustration on the nurse. Juliet shouts, “Blister’d by thy tongue for such a wish!” Then she says, “Will you speak well of him that killed thy cousin? Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?” After having a sudden change of thoughts, Juliet is now stumped with whether or not she should be loyal to her banished husband or dead cousin. She eventually makes the decision that she picks Romeo’s side, but she is still enraged over the fact that he killed her cousin.

    Reply
    1. trinityt

      I agree. Juliet’s mood changes quickly when it’s about Romeo in this situation. Although she is mad at him for killing Tybalt, she still loves Romeo.

      Reply
  18. Hannah Pitkofsky

    During the text during Act III, scene ii, Juliet receives word from her nurse that Romeo has been exiled from Verona. To my surprise, she immediately begins accusing Romeo and trying to avenge Tybalt’s name, however, as their conversation goes on, her perspective changes and she begins to support Romeo and say that he wouldn’t do it if it wasn’t for something important to him. When the nurse first approaches Juliet, she cries out,

    “Blister’d be thy tongue
    For such a wish! he was not born to shame:
    Upon his brow shame is ashamed to sit;
    For ’tis a throne where honour may be crown’d
    Sole monarch of the universal earth.
    O, what a beast was I to chide at him!”

    She is upset at her husband for killing her cousin, however, she forgives him once her nurse asks her if she will speak harshly about Romeo, in which she changes her mind and supports her newlywed husband.

    “Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?
    Ah, poor my lord, what tongue shall smooth thy name…
    But, O, it presses to my memory,
    Like damned guilty deeds to sinners’ minds:
    ‘Tybalt is dead, and Romeo–banished;’
    That ‘banished,’ that one word ‘banished,’
    Hath slain ten thousand Tybalts. Tybalt’s death
    Was woe enough, if it had ended there:
    Or, if sour woe delights in fellowship
    And needly will be rank’d with other griefs,
    Why follow’d not, when she said ‘Tybalt’s dead,’
    Thy father, or thy mother, nay, or both,
    Which modern lamentations might have moved?
    But with a rear-ward following Tybalt’s death,
    ‘Romeo is banished,’ to speak that word,
    Is father, mother, Tybalt, Romeo, Juliet,
    All slain, all dead. ‘Romeo is banished!’
    There is no end, no limit, measure, bound,
    In that word’s death; no words can that woe sound.”

    Juliet is grief-stricken, not only because of the death of Tybalt but also on the banishment of Romeo, who she married the night before. Her reaction to the event changed over the course of 3 lines in the script, but the meaning behind her change in reaction takes up so much more than the quick change that occurred in the script.

    Reply
  19. Maddie

    In tonights reading of Act III, Scene ii of “Romeo and Juliet”, we see a change in Juliet throughout her conversation with the nurse. At the beginning of the conversation, Juliet is shocked and a bit disappointed. She is confused about how to feel, because although Romeo is her husband, he did a terrible thing when he killed her dearest cousin Tybalt. Many things that she says show her confusion, such as “Beautiful tyrant! fiend angelical!
    Dove-feather’d raven! wolvish-ravening lamb!” She is unsure about how she feels right up until the nurse starts talking. The nurse begins to say bad things about Romeo, and expects Juliet to agree. At this, her mind is made up. As soon as she heard the nurse say shameful things about her husband, she immediately takes his side and defends him. We see that throughout the conversation she changes her opinion on the situation. It seems that she made up her mind only because she didn’t like the idea of the nurse saying bad things about her husband. She didn’t really agree with Romeo’s actions, but couldn’t stand to see the nurse go against him. This is proven because she is undecided until the nurse interjects. I wonder what Juliet would have done if the decision was truly up to her with no influence from the nurse.

    Reply
  20. josepha4

    In tonight reading of Romeo and Juliet it is obvious that Juliet’s feelings are changing rapidly and without much thought. Juliet is having a conversation with her nurse and they find out that Tybalt had been murdered by Romeo. Juliet is at first filled with anger and distaste as we can see when she insults Romeo. “When thou didst bower the spirit of a fiend
    In moral paradise of such sweet flesh?
    Juliet is confused how the man she loved had become a murderer. Then, when the nurse begins to agree wit Juliet and insult Romeo, Juliet becomes defensive of her love and snaps at the nurse which is surprising, seeing that she just spoke badly of him. “Blister’d be thy tongue
    For such a wish!
    Here Juliet is seen shaming the nurse for shaming Romeo. Juliet is at a crossroad and it’s a difficult decision on who to blame, her love, for killing her cousin or Tybalt himself for provoking the fight. It’s clear the nurse helps play into the Juliet’s decision of who to blame. The constant changing in Juliet’s head makes it very interesting to see what she will do next.

    Reply
  21. trinityt

    During Act III, scene ii, readers sees the changes Juliet displayed when the Nurse told her that Romeo killed Tybalt and he is banished from Verona. She went from being very angry at Romeo and disappointed in him to somewhat supporting and loving him.

    When the Nurse told Juliet the news that Romeo killed Tybalt, she became very angry and disappointed in him. “Dove-feathered raven, wolvish-ravening lamb! Despised substance of divinest show! Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st, A damned saint, an honorable villain.” Juliet is saying that Romeo is a raven that’s covered in dove’s feathers, meaning that Romeo is wearing a disguise, hiding who he really is. She also said that Romeo may seem kind and handsome on the outside, but he is a “villain”. The Nurse agreed with Juliet by saying that all men are evil and deceivers.

    However, Juliet’s attitude about Romeo changes when the Nurse said, “Shame come to Romeo!”. The Nurse is saying that bad things and shame should come to Romeo for the bad deed that he did, which was killing Tybalt. “Blistered be thy tongue For such a wish! He was not born to shame.” Juliet reacted by saying that you shouldn’t say and wish such things to happen to Romeo. A few lines ago, Juliet was nothing but mad at Romeo, almost to no sign of love between them, but now she is the opposite of what she was like literally a few lines earlier. “O, what a beast was I to chide at him!” Juliet also, now, call herself a beast for being angry at Romeo earlier and saying such negative things about him, her husband. In addition, she is upset and sad about the fact that Romeo is banished from Verona.

    Here the readers sees the changes Juliet shows about her attitude towards Romeo in this situation. She is mad and disappointed in Romeo that he killed Tybalt, yet she still loves him and is fill with sorrow upon the fact that Romeo has been banished from Verona.

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  22. Hannah M.

    In tonights reading we see Juliet go through a series of mood swings. Juliet is informed by the nurse that her dear cousin, Tybalt, had been slain. The Nurse soon gets onto telling Juliet it was Romeo who killed him. Juliet felt uneasy and sad that Tybalt was dead and shocked Romeo would do such a thing. As she sobbed and pittied Tybalt the nurse says “Same come to Romeo”. When yhe nurse saus that Juliets mood completely changes. She goes from sobbing to being confident in saying that Romeo hasn’t lived to have shame be out upon him. Although Tybalt is Juliet’s cousin, she is defending Romeo for he is her husband. She wouldn’t want her true love to have shame put forth to him. Juliet gets frusturated with the nurse after saying that and didn’t like how she disrespected her husband, Romeo. This shows how Juliet’s mood changes when hearing/talking about Romeo and how she loves him very much. Even more than her own cousin!

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