March 18

O, I am fortune’s fool!

Image result for image of romeo and mercutio

Tonight, after you finish reading Act III, scene i, of Romeo and Juliet please write your response here.  You have free choice of response, but please keep your comments grounded in the text and, unless you are the very first student to comment, respond to previous comments as a part of your comment.  In other words, let’s try to have an online conversation and see where it leads us!

As always, please check your writing for spelling, punctuation, and grammar.

R&J blog #13


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Posted March 18, 2019 by equinson in category Romeo and Juliet

33 thoughts on “O, I am fortune’s fool!

  1. Zoe

    Act III scene i had a lot of action that was created by many men and their choices. One of the most important choices was Romeo’s choice to not be involved in the fight with Tybalt. He told the men that he only loved others, even the Capulets which are supposed to be his enemy.

    “I do protest, I never injured thee,
    But love thee better than thou canst devise,
    Till thou shalt know the reason of my love:
    And so, good Capulet,—which name I tender
    As dearly as my own,—be satisfied.”

    He doesn’t allow himself to give even a chance of hurting another person and wouldn’t dare to be violent in Verona streets. Although this should be a resolution to the problem, once Mercutio starts to fight Tybalt and Tybalt takes a stab at him, Romeo suddenly wants to get involved again. He quickly realizes while he can express his love with Juliet, to try and only use love in a world of men who are so willing to fight. Once Mercutio dies his old hatred for the Capulets, and what they did to his family, kicked in and he lashed back at Tybalt, killing him. The strange choice to lash back at Tybalt instead of sticking with his old idea of keeping the love between them is the big shocker in this scene.

    Reply
    1. Mylesn

      I agree the fact that Romeo had, moments before, shown love towards Tybalt and then fighting to solve his problem.

      Reply
  2. Sunna

    Tonight’s reading showed me a lot about Romeo’s character. Up until now, he has been impulsive, rash, and ignorant. However, when Mercutio was fighting with Tybalt, Romeo actually started to use his head. He had the sense to try to stop them, but, unfortunately, it only made things worse. But this still shows that Romeo isn’t just a one-dimensional character. Perhaps he loses himself around Juliet, and starts to think unclearly because he is just so in love with her. He is also still young, and is still finding himself. Mercutio, on the other hand, was quite reckless in this scene. He instigated the fight and tried to rile Tybalt up, which essentially led to his own death. He should have heeded Romeo´s advice, but he didn’t seem to care at the time. Mercutio seemed to have an itch to fight, and paid for it with his life in the end. While Tybalt is in no way guilt-free, Mercutio should be held responsible for his actions. He could have gotten someone else hurt during the fight, and there would be no one to blame but himself. Not only does this show how arrogant he is, since he was so sure that he would come out as the victor, but it also shows that he has quite a lot of inner anger within him. Perhaps this will finally show some people just how dangerous the feud between the Montagues and the Capulets is.

    Reply
    1. jane

      I agree with your thinking. Scene i was able to delve deeper into two characters that at first seemed very similar, but as you said turned out to be very different.

      Reply
  3. Mylesn

    In this scene two character have their lives taken away by another. Mercutio’s death was one that struck Romeo hard, to avenge his death he fights Tybalt which ends up with Romeo as the victor. Though Tybalt dealing the fatal blow to Mercutio he is not solely responsible for his death. It was his own. Tybalt’s problem was with Romeo, not Mercutio. When Romeo turned down the challenge, Mercutio could have let it be and no one would have gotten hurt, but he had antagonized Tybalt, then challenged him. He did not want him to feel as if he had just won.

    “O calm, dishonourable, vile submission!
    Alla stoccata carries it away.
    Tybalt, you rat-catcher, will you walk?”

    After the fight where Tybalt has fled and Mercutio is talking about his injury, he makes it seem unimportant and not life threatening. We know this was in fact mortal wound and he would die from it. He does not take urgency in his voice and the people around him don’t take urgency in their actions.

    “‘Ay, ay, a scratch, a scratch; marry, ’tis enough.
    Where is my page? Go, villain, fetch a surgeon.’

    ‘Courage, man; the hurt cannot be much.'”

    Without the actions take to help him he dies and this is due to none other than his own actions.

    Reply
  4. maxwellw

    This scene brought about a great conflict in our characters lives and will most likely lead to much more to come. The sudden, fatal violence in the first scene of Act 3, as well as the buildup to the fighting, serves as a reminder that, for all its emphasis on love, beauty, and romance, Romeo and Juliet still takes place in a dangerous world in which notions of honor, pride, and status are prone to erupt in a fury of conflict. The viciousness and dangers of the play’s social environment are tools that Shakespeare uses to make the lovers’ romance seem even more precious and fragile. Their relationship is the audience’s only respite from the brutal world pressing against their love. The fights between Mercutio and Tybalt and then between Romeo and Tybalt are chaotic; Tybalt kills Mercutio under Romeo’s arm, flees, and returns to fight Romeo, who kills him in revenge. Passion outweighs reason at every turn.

    Reply
  5. caseyz

    Towards the beginning of act 3 scene 1, when Tybalt comes looking for Romeo, Romeo responds to him with,

    I do protest, I never injured thee,
    But love thee better than thou canst devise,
    Till thou shalt know the reason of my love:
    And so, good Capulet,—which name I tender
    As dearly as my own,—be satisfied.

    This shows that Romeo now thinks of himself as neutral to the Montague-Capulet conflict. When he says “And so, good Capulet,—which name I tender, As dearly as my own” he is saying that he cares as much about the Capulets as he does the Montagues. He says that he would never hurt Tybalt, since he is a Capulet just like Juliet. but the fact that he doesn’t tell Tybalt that he is married to Juliet shows that he is scared. In all of the past scenes, Romeo acted like he wanted everyone in the world to know that he was in love with Juliet. He said that he wouldn’t care if he was killed as long as he got to be with her. Yet in this scene, he remains quiet about his love for her. Maybe he’s having second thoughts about saying that he wouldn’t care if the Capulets killed him. He says, “But love thee better than thou canst devise” with means that he loves Tybalt because he is Juliet’s cousin, but can’t come to tell him that he is married to Juliet. He knows that if Tybalt found out, he would kill him.

    Reply
    1. Kate Ma.

      You bring up an interesting point about how Romeo is secretive about his marriage with Juliet to Tybalt.

      Reply
  6. Emily

    Throughout the whole play of Romeo and Juliet, the readers experience many themes of duality, but in Act III, scene i, this is extremely prevalent. In the course of this scene, two people pass away. One capulet and one montague. This foreshadowing towards the death of another Capulet and Montague, plays to the theme of duality that is important in portraying the message that Shakespeare is sending. He is saying that although two people or things can be different, at the end of the day they are actually quite similar. When Mercutio and Tybalt died, people grieve their deaths in similar fashions. Everyone was struck at the horror of the event, and they could not think that something this bad would actually happen to their family. Even if the pair did not like each other in life, they were still very similar. They both came from families that cared about them. Mercutio cares about his family so much that it lead him to start the fight that would end his life. Tybalt cares for his family enough to insult Romeo to the point of a fight with Mercutio. If they did not care about their family and their names, then this accident might have been avoided.

    Reply
  7. Kate Ma.

    In Act 3, scene 1, we really start to see the tragedy of this novel. Mercutio and Tybalt start off by teasing and making fun of each other. However it gets too far and they start to physically fight with each other using their swords. Mercutio acts all calm during this fight, but one single turn caused Tybalt’s sword to impale him. This really affected Romeo. It really brought out another side of him. When Romeo sees Mercutio die in front of him, he gets very angry and violent towards Tybalt. In the beginning of the book we saw Romeo as a young boy who didn’t like to get involved with these conflicts. However now since Tybalt killed Mercutio, Romeo feels the desire of revenge towards Tybalt. He starts to fight Tybalt, and ends up killing him. The movie really presented the shock Romeo had after killing Tybalt. Now we just have to see how Juliet reacts to this, then again Tybalt is her cousin.

    Reply
    1. josepha4

      Yeah I’m wondering if Juliet will take the side of her love(Romeo) or her family. Which is more important to her at this point?

      Reply
  8. josepha4

    Act three scene one can be described as the beginning of the end. Blood was shed on both sides and the only thing that can satisfy bloodshed is more bloodshed. It clearly foreshadows the death of Romeo and Juliet. This plays into the idea of duality that has been observed throughout the play. While the Montagues and Capulets view each other as adversaries with nothing in common they in fact both value similar things. While we read further we can see a different perspective, instead of love causing destruction it also brings good change such as a shift in Romeo’s demeanor. He goes from being an impulsive, rash and ignorant person to transforming into a sensible person. He attempts to dismiss Tybalts pugnacious behavior and turn to peace. Maybe if everyone saw the world the way Romeo did, through a nonviolent persons eyes then nobody would have died and bloodshed wouldn’t just lead to more bloodshed but rather mourning and a desire for change.

    Reply
    1. Mikayla Friedman

      Interesting idea of satisfying bloodhshed with more bloodshed. This is especially the case for this novel since so many people die.

      Reply
  9. Madi R.

    In this scene, Shakespeare suddenly changes the play into a tragedy by killing off two characters, Mercutio and Tybalt. In the beginning Tybalt is looking for a fight. After some bickering Mercutio replies to the challenge, “Tybalt, you rat-catcher, will you go fight me?” Tybalt and Mercutio then fight each other. The fight was not serious at first and the two boys were just fooling around. In this instance I think the saying “it is all fun and games till someone gets hurt” really applies because Mercutio gets stabbed by one misstep by Tybalt. Furthermore, Mercutio could have gotten help for his wound if he did not joke around all the time leading the boys to think the injury was not that bad. After Mercutio’s death Romeo is outraged. He then decides to avenge Mercutio by fighting and killing Tybalt. Romeo is very surprised that he killed Tybalt. I think that Romeo will definitely regret killing Tybalt after all he did do it out of aggression and was not thinking clearly. Additionally, Juliet may take the incident the wrong way and may not forgive Romeo so easily.

    Reply
  10. Laila

    Act 3 scene 1 had a different mood than many previous scenes. There was a lot of violence, recklessness and darkness. However, we see how much Romeo truly cares about the people he loves. For example, when Mercutio and Tybalt first begin to fight, Romeo is the one who tries to split them up. By doing so, he is showing how he cares about Juliet. While many of the other spectators cheer, adding fuel to the fight, Romeo is willing to break up this rivalry. He doesn’t want Juliet to be upset. Plus, the more fighting there is between the Montague’s and Capulet’s, the more people won’t accept Romeo and Juliet’s relationship. Therefore, In a way, Romeo is looking out for himself too. When Mercutio is killed, Romeo is quick to avenge him. He comes to a breaking point and eventually, he fights Tybalt himself. Although killing Tybalt will probably get him in a lot of trouble, it still shows how much he cares about his family (Mercutio). It will be interesting to see how Romeo’s love of his family and his love for Juliet end up balancing out with one another.

    Reply
  11. jane

    Act III scene i showed many examples of duality. Throughout the play, there has been a subtle, yet consistent, theme of duality. There have been many different examples, such as night and day, the sun and the moon, but the most significant, hate and love. The pattern of love and hate is important to the events that occurred in the first scene. First, there is hate in the center of the town, because Tybalt is picking on Mercutio and Benvolio. Then, Romeo enters the scene, and attempts to break up the guys and tries to keep the peace. Since he is in love with Juliet, a Capulet, he wants to try his best to end the hatred and fighting between the Montagues and Capulets. But after a little horseplay, and the accidental murder of Mercutio, Romeo’s perspective completely changes. His peaceful mindset changes to fuming rage, and he sets out to murder Tybalt, and succeeds. The duality of love and hate is relevant in this scene, and in the prior scenes, because it seems as if whenever one emotion gets too strong, the other balances t out. For example, Romeo and Juliet are so in love, that they decide to kiss and hug and get married the very next day. After several scenes with a loving tone, the plot changes, to where the readers now sense extreme feelings of hate.

    Reply
  12. johnh1

    Usually he is seen as very irrational and makes rash decisions. However, when he needs to, he can apparently act calm and try to avoid the violence about to take place. This shows his loyalty to Mercutio. Also, Mercutio shows his loyalty to Romeo when he draws his sword. I think this makes Mercutio’s death a lot more meaningful. It also shows how Romeo can act when he has to protect those who h loves.

    Reply
  13. Mikayla Friedman

    In act 3 scene 1 Tybalt kills Mercutio and then Romeo kills Tybalt. Before seeing the end of this scene, I didn’t think Romeo would avenge Mercutio because I thought he wouldn’t want to cause trouble with Juliet’s house. I was wrong. As soon as Mercutio is pronounced dead the Montague boys have to hold Romeo back. This goes to show that friendship is more meaningful than Romeo and Juliet’s love. Romeo was willing to fight a member of the Capulet house even though that is the house of his love, Juliet. Maybe if Juliet and Romeo had known each other for a longer amount of time the outcome would have been different.
    I think one of the reasons why Romeo didn’t want to fight Tybalt was because of Juliet. The text states:
    “And so, good Capulet, which name I tender
    As dearly as mine own, be satisfied.” (p. 119 72-73)
    Romeo now regards the Capulet name with the same meaning of his own as a result of his love for Juliet. That is why one would think that he wouldn’t kill Tybalt, but he did. It was almost as if he completely forgot about Juliet and he only cared about getting revenge on Tybalt.
    I wonder what will happen between Romeo and Juliet now that Romeo has been banished from Verona. Will Juliet go with Romeo? Will Romeo even leave Verona? I think the banishment isn’t that great of a punishment since Romeo did take the life of Tybalt, even when the Prince warned what would happen if fighting ever broke out on the streets of Verona again. If Tybalt has still been alive, I wonder what his price would be for killing Mercutio. Would it be the same as Romeo’s, or would it be less since Mercutio doesn’t really belong to a house of great wealth?

    Reply
    1. Emma Garbowitz

      That’s a very interesting point! I never thought of it from Juliet’s perspective. I wonder what she will think of Romeo being banished from Verona.

      Reply
  14. Emma Garbowitz

    One part of scene three that struck me as interesting was when Mercutio casted a plague on both houses (Montagues and Capulets) and wishes them bad fortune. The text states, “Help me into some house, Benvolio. Or I shall faint. A plague o’ both your houses!” This shows how Mercutio cursed both the Capulets and the Montagues. I was absolutely shocked that Mercutio did this considering he seemed to be good friends with both Benvolio and Romeo. Although he claimed to be on neither side of the battle between the two houses, Mercutio always seemed to be leaning toward the Montague side. He seemed to be closer and more open with the Montagues and more against the Capulets.
    Furthermore, I thought that Mercutio’s death was a very controversial topic. Many people can be blamed for it, however some people had more of an impact than others. The first person I think that should be blamed is obviously Tybalt. He was the one who actually stabbed Merctuio in the chest and provoked someone to fight him (even though he preferably wanted to fight Romeo). If he never started this argument, and caused the fight to break out, Mercutio never would’ve been stabbed. Another person to blame for Mercutio’s death is Romeo. Romeo got in the middle of the fight when the two men were “joking around”. When he got in the middle of Mercutio and Tybalt he caused Tybalt’s aim to be messed up and stab Mercutio in the chest. Maybe if Romeo never stepped in between the two men, Tybalt never would’ve been struck with the sword. The last person I think is to be blamed for Mercutio’s death is Mercutio himself. If he never offered to fight Tybalt after Romeo rejected his offer, Mercutio never would’ve been put in the situation he was in. He obviously has some blood against the Capulets and more specifically Tybalt that made him so eager to fight. Therefore, the death of Mercutio cannot be directed towards a specific person because multiple people are to be blamed.

    Reply
    1. angelicac1

      I agree that both Tybalt and Romeo were to be blamed for Mercutio’s death, but I believe that Romeo was to blame more. Although he tried to put out the fuel to the fire, he only worsened it and made it grow stronger.

      Reply
  15. Hannah Pitkofsky

    During Act III, scene i, we see a battle in the streets of Verona between Mercutio/Romeo and Tybalt. Throughout the scene, numerous events occur that lead up to the big fight, but one that struck me as interesting was when Romeo mentioned Capulet as his family.

    “I do protest, I never injured thee,
    But love thee better than thou canst devise,
    Till thou shalt know the reason of my love:
    And so, good Capulet,—which name I tender
    As dearly as my own,—be satisfied.”

    At the end of Act II, we see Romeo and Juliet go off to be married offstage/offscreen. Therefore, Romeo is now a member of both the Montague and the Capulet families, as well as Juliet. Romeo wishes to tear up the argument that was going on between one of his good friends and one of his new relatives (Tybalt is Juliet’s cousin). Romeo tried to end the battle with peace, but Tybalt nor Mercutio were satisfied with peace, leading to the fight which would end both Mercutio’s and Tybalt’s lives.

    Reply
  16. angelicac1

    Mercutio’s death is considered to be a controversial topic because multiple people are blamed for it. After watching the scene from Zeffirelli’s version and reading the scene from the book, I believe that Romeo is to blame more than Tybalt. Romeo’s intentions to break up the fight were obviously good, but he only worsened the fuel of the fire that was already bad to begin with. As if he couldn’t make the situation even worse, Romeo acted on impulse to fight with Tybalt after Mercutio’s death which resulted to Tybalt’s death. As shown in previous scenes in the book, Romeo acts with passion rather than ration and logic. Since Mercutio was close to Romeo it caused Romeo to be enraged over his death. He then decides that he couldn’t just let Tybalt get away with the death of his friend. This only shows readers that Romeo leads with his heart and emotions instead of his own mind.

    Reply
    1. trinityt

      Yes, I agree with your statement. Romeo was one of the people to blame for Mercutio’s death. Romeo does what his heart and emotions told him to instead of thinking logically and rationally. Although his intentions are good, he only made it worse.

      Reply
  17. stephaniec

    Act III scene i is very significant to the plot of Romeo and Juliet. This scene consisted of two fights, two deaths, and two very big consequences for Romeo. In essence, two fights take place in the streets of Verona, that end with the deaths of Mercutio and Tybalt. In addition, Romeo is left with two very big consequences. He is banned from Verona, while also just killing his new wife’s cousin.

    Even with all of this, this scene acts as the turning point for the play. For instance, most of the play has been calm, happy, and romantic. However, the play takes a turn for the worse. The prince said in the beginning of the play that the next fight to break out would result in great consequences. As a result, Romeo is now faced with many obstacles. He is banned from Verona, the place where Juliet lives. Also, his close friend is dead, and he has just killed Juliet’s cousin.

    Being on opposite sides of an ancient grudge between their two families is now one of the many obstacles Juliet and Romeo’s love will have to overcome.

    Reply
  18. trinityt

    In Act III, scene i, there were many things that took place.
    One of them was before the fight between Mercutio and Tybalt when Romeo said that he sees Tybalt, a Capulet, as his family now. Romeo now sees the Capulet as his family since he is part of both the Montague family and the Capulet family, so is Juliet. Romeo thinks that ending the grudge between their families will be easy with his and Juliet’s marriage. However, not everything is easy in this world.
    Another thing is that the deaths of Mercutio, a Montague, and Tybalt, a Capulet, foreshadows the deaths of Romeo and Juliet. At first, it was peaceful for a little while, just like how Romeo’s and Juliet’s love started out, but then the fighting continues. As the fighting continues, it will get harder for Romeo and Juliet. This, in the end, results in both of them dying. The deaths of a pair of lovers, Romeo, a Montague, and Juliet, a Capulet.

    Reply
    1. Maddie

      I agree with the idea of foreshadowing! That is a great way to think of the events that have taken place in this scene.

      Reply
  19. Maddie

    In tonights reading of Act III, Scene i of “Romeo and Juliet”, the main focus is on Romeo. Juliet does not appear in the scene, but she does play a role in the events of the scene. In this scene, Tybalt wishes to fight Romeo. Romeo has been greatly changed by meeting Juliet, so he refuses, saying that Capulets are just as good as Montagues. Therefore, Tybalt fights Mercutio instead. Romeo so badly wishes to end this fight, as well as the fight between the two families, because he wants to be allowed to love Juliet. Trying to do so, he gets in the way of Tybalt and Mercutio’s fight. This causes Tybalt to accidentally stab Mercutio and kill him. This angers Romeo, because know the fight has gotten even worse. As a result, Romeo kills Tybalt. Romeo seems to immediately regret what he did. This scene is significant to the plot of the story because know the two families are being drawn apart more than ever, making it even harder for Romeo and Juliet to be together. I predict that there is going to be a big penalty given to each house by the king, since they violated the rule. They broke the peace between the families, and therefore will suffer the consequences.

    Reply
  20. Sophie

    The first thing that I noticed about act 3 scene 1 was that it was daytime. One of the main forms of duality in Romeo and Juliet is daytime versus nighttime. When the scenes are during the day it is bright and hot outside, and the situations always are heated and chaotic. On the other hand when it is nighttime, it is cool and calm and usually more romantic. So right off the bat I knew this scene would be violent. There was a lot of sword fighting and Mercutio and Tybalt ended up dying. Another form of duality that we saw was how both members of each family ended up dying. This was a foreshadow of how the entire play ends. Also the fact that they were fighting with two swords per person symbolized the duality. Swords are dangerous fighting or protection weapons and it added too the drama of death after death.

    Reply
  21. Hannah M.

    Act III, scene i was very eventful and shocking in a sorrowful way. First Mercutio is killed by Tybalt, then Tyblat is killed by Romeo and Romeo is then banned from Verona.

    Before the fights even started Romeo and placed a “plague” on both houses. Basically he placed a curse on both houses signaling the death of a person from each house. Tybalt angered Mercutio so they both drawed their swords and were really just goofing off. Romeo trys breaking up the fight saying the price will punish them for fighting in the streets again. Romeo gets in the way for the last time and Tybalt accidentally stabs Mercutio under Romeos arm. AFterwards, scince Mercutio is such a jokester no one took him seriously when he was hurt and telling people to get a medic. He even told Romeo Tybalt stabbed him under his arm. ROmeo doesn’t really put what Mercutio said to that so he doesn’t get a medic. When Mercutio dies Romeo impulsively kills Tybalt in a fight because Tybalt killed Mercutio.

    In these paragraphs I am explaining Romeos rash desicions and how both deaths were partly his fault.

    Reply
  22. Brishti

    In Act III, scene i, I noticed a common theme of sense vs. temper. This can be seen in the four main characters who were in this scene, which were Mercutio, Tybalt, Romeo, and Benvolio. Each person portrays either good sense or a lack thereof. While there is plenty of blame to be shifted around here, the true villian of the scene is the boyish arrogance that caused a lack of sense. This lack of sense caused two people to die in less than a few minutes. First, Mercutio is one to have a lack of sense. Instead of following Benvolio’s advice to not pick a fight with the Capulets, he gets into a fight with Tybalt, (where he wasn’t even challanged), which ends up in Mercutio’s death. It was because he didn’t have the sense to stop which resulted in his death. However, the last few moments of his life are played out in a way that is similar to “The boy who cried wolf”. Mercutio is always senseless and is always playing jokes, that no one takes him seriously when he is actually in danger. Tybalt is of course to blame for both Mercutio’s death and his own. He was a hot-headed and arrogant to try and pick fights when he has no reason to. He had too much pride to stop and just leave it, which shows just how senseless he was. Romeo is one of the most interesting people in this scene. He starts off by trying to be sensible and breaking up the fighting, but he ended up making things worse by getting involved. The fact that he was trying to stop it made everyone only want to try harder to kill the other. He goes from trying to have sense to being completely senseless really quickly. After he finds out Mercutio is dead, he goes to Tybalt and kills him out of revenge. It was, perhaps, the heat of the moment and the extreme waves of emotion he was hit with that made him act like this. Finally, Benvolio had a subtle but sure part in all of this. So far in the play, we see him be the “good guy” in most of the situations. His motives seem to be to stop everyone from fighting, and his ultimate goal is to want peace between the Montagues and the Capulets. He also seems to be more of a conscience, whose personality is seemingly opposite of the rash, bold Mercutio. So the question is: where was he while they were fighting? For someone who usually has the most sense out of everyone, he did not have much sense now. We know that he paid attention to the whole ordeal, because he recites what happened perfectly to everyone after the prince questions him. It seems that for once, Benvolio did not try to make the senseless be sensible.

    Reply

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