March 13

What man art thou that, thus bescreened in night, / So stumblest on my counsel?

What can you infer about Romeo and Juliet by comparing their use of language  in Act II, scene ii, lines 52-111? Consider their main concerns in this excerpt.  Be sure to use specific textual evidence to support your claim, and further, be sure to make clear how that evidence actually supports that claim.

As always, please be sure to follow the rules of standard in your writing and respond to at least one other comment in this thread.

R&J blog #10


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Posted March 13, 2019 by equinson in category Romeo and Juliet

29 thoughts on “What man art thou that, thus bescreened in night, / So stumblest on my counsel?

  1. Kate Ma.

    Juliet is sensible and is worried about the dangers of their love, while Romeo is reckless and not nearly as mature as Juliet. Juliet frets over what would happen if Romeo was caught by her family, “And the place death, considering who thou art,/If any of my kinsmen are no stop to me.” Romeo meanwhile says, “And what love can do, that dares love attempt./Therefore thy kinsmen are no stop to me.” Romeo is saying that her family is no obstacle for hims and shall not hurt him, because he is in love. While this is very sweet and all, realistically speaking, this is not a solution to the problem. Love is not some immortal potion, and it will certainly not save Romeo from a sword. Juliet is worried and frightened, and is definitely more cautious in her love, less willing for others to find out, and is embarrassed when Romeo hears what she is saying. The language that is used shows the differences of feelings, but also how they are similar. They both love each other for who they are on the inside, despite their titles, and are not in it for the money. I find Romeo almost childish in comparison to Juliet, even though she’s younger.

    Reply
    1. Sunna

      I agree completely with you. Romeo is acting immature and Juliet seems like the only responsible one in their new relationship. Romeo needs to start acting like an adult and think about the fact that he isn’t just putting his life in danger, but also Juliet’s.

      Reply
  2. jane

    In act II, scene ii, there are many literary tools used. Such tools are imagery, symbolism, similes, and themes. The conversation between Romeo and Juliet is very poetic. Although the dialogue we are reading is part of a play written by a poet, the two characters converse much more poetically and like a sonnet, compared to the other dialogue in the play. In scene ii, there were also many examples of imagery, such as lines 19 to 23.

    Romeo:

    The brightness of her cheek would shame those stars
    As daylight doth a lamp; her eye in heaven
    Would through the airy region stream so bright
    That birds would sing and think it were not night.

    Romeo uses imagery by painting a clear picture of what Juliet looks like. He thinks her characteristics are very bright and lively. Romeo also uses many details relating to nature or heaven. I think that this is significant because for the time, nature and religion were considered very important and very beautiful. These two things were also very significant in people’s lives, much like how Juliet is very significant in Romeo’s life. This shows that they both take their relationship very seriously, and that it is something that is very important to the both of them.

    Reply
  3. stephaniec

    In Act 2 scene ii, Romeo and Juliet share a very significant conversation about their relationship. We learned that Juliet is more of a realist, while Romeo is more of an idealist. For example, at the beginning of their conversation, Juliet worries of the heavy consequences that will come from their doomed relationship. She said to him, “And the place death, considering who thou art, if any kinsmen find thee here.”, meaning that us being acquaintances, could be the sole reason you could get killed, not even including the fact that we are in love with each other. However, he responds to her, “And what love can do, that dare love attempts. Therefore, thy kinsmen are no stop to me”. Essentially, Juliet believes that their love could lead them to their death, while Romeo believes that they can beat all the odds and withstand whatever is holding them back. She tried to focus on the real life obstacles that they will face, but is said to be wrong time and time again by Romeo, the idealist. But, similarly to Romeo, by the end of the conversation she is convinced that their love will in fact, beat the odds.

    Reply
  4. Mylesn

    In Act 2 scene ii Romeo overhears Juliet speak of him and he comes out and expresses his feelings for her. In this conversations we see the other sides of Romeo and Juliet. Romeo thinks of the romance and love him and Juliet can share. While Juliet thinks of the fact that this love will cause problems. She is thinking of the consequences where Romeo is simply doing the actions. “If they do see thee, they will murder thee.” Romeo responds to this with a romantic comment about Juliet’s eyes. “Alack, there lies more peril in thine eye” This is showing the relation ship of Romeo and Juliet, where Juliet is the sensible one and Romeo is the romantic one. “And I am proof against their enmity.” Romeo also believes that their love will protect them from any consequences that will become to them. She eventually is persuaded to see Romeo’s point of view. Though being different in their ideas of where this relationship will take them they agree to get married the next day.

    Reply
  5. angelicac1

    Through lines 52-111 of Act II, scene ii of Romeo and Juliet, readers can see that both of the star-crossed lovers have opposite personas from each other. Juliet is much more realistic and practical than Romeo, who acts as if he’s in a love trance where all he thinks about is Juliet. In line 75, Juliet states, “If they do see thee, they will murder thee.” These lines show Juliet is clearly concerned that Romeo will be spotted by someone which will end up with him being murdered. Romeo, on the other hand, doesn’t care about what will happen to his life because he is too focussed on his love for Juliet. In lines 88 and 89, Romeo states, “At that vast shore washed, with the farthest see, I should adventure for such merchandise.” Romeo is basically saying that he would travel any distance to be with Juliet, who is referred to as “merchandise.” I was a little appalled to read about Juliet being referred to as an object. Maybe Romeo meant that she is his, but I’m not sure. Back to the point, Romeo being love blinded causes his actions and judgement to be affected easily while Juliet is more mature and she doesn’t allow her love to completely affect her judgement.

    Reply
    1. Mikayla Friedman

      Yes, they really do have opposite personalities, but they are still perfect for each other! Also, I think both Romeo and Juliet are in love trances, but Juliet may be a little more aware of the consequences of their love.

      Reply
    2. trinityt

      I agree that Juliet is more aware of the consequences of the situation more than Romeo since he is in a love daze state. Even though their personalities are opposite, they still love each other. I guess this is where the saying “Opposites attract” comes in.

      Reply
  6. caseyz

    In this part of the novel, we see Romeo and Juliet’s true personalities. When Romeo goes to Juliet’s balcony to talk to her, he overhears her talking to herself about Romeo. She is in love with him, but is worried that he will be killed by her men, since she is a Capulet and he is a Montague. She is trying to be more practical and trying to come up with a plan so herself and Romeo can be together without disturbing the peace in their town. She says,

    “How camest thou hither, tell me, and wherefore?
    The orchard walls are high and hard to climb,
    And the place death, considering who thou art,
    If any of my kinsmen find thee here.”

    Unlike Juliet, Romeo could care less about the practicality of their relationship. all he wants is for him and Juliet to be together. When he is talking to himself, he starts to say more irrational things like he wouldn’t care if he was killed by the Capulets, and that he is so in love with Juliet that he would die for her. He says,

    “I have night’s cloak to hide me from their eyes,
    And but thou love me, let them find me here.
    My life were better ended by their hate
    Than death proroguèd, wanting of thy love.”

    Juliet is more practical and Romeo is more irrational

    Reply
  7. Sunna

    Tonight’s reading showed me a lot about Romeo and Juliet as individuals. They each have very different thoughts on their current situation, which is very clearly shown by these lines, in particular:

    Juliet: How camest thou hither, tell me, and wherefore?
    The orchard walls are high and hard to climb
    And the place is death, considering who thou art,
    If any of my kinsmen find thee here

    Romeo: With love’s light wings did I o’erperch these walls,
    For stony limits cannot hold love out,
    And what love can do, that dares love attempt
    Therefore thy kinsmen are no stop to me.

    It is clear that Juliet looks at their situation in a more practical way. She knows that if anyone were to find Romeo, that he would be killed. However, Romeo is so lost in his love for Juliet, and doesn’t have a care in the world. He thinks that everything will be okay as long as he and Juliet are together. When Juliet says that Romeo could be murdered, his response is that, as long as they are together, he would be “invincible”. As ridiculous as this sounds, it truly reflects how people act when they first fall in love-like lovesick puppies. However, this could potentially be very dangerous. If Romeo isn’t careful, he could but both himself and Juliet at risk. He may also influence Juliet in a negative way, which would make her much more reckless, Hopefully, Juliet can bring Romeo back to his senses and make him understand that they can’t be impulsive. They are truly opposites in this way, besides the fact that their families are enemies. Juliet is clearly the more grounded and logical one, but Romeo is impulsive and reckless. This makes me wonder about who will influence who, or if they will simply clash and self-destruct.

    Reply
  8. Laila

    The conversation shared between Romeo and Juliet in Act 2 scene ii says a lot about both of their characters. While Juliet is mainly concerned with her family finding out and killing Romeo while Romeo is too blinded by love to see the consequences he’s going to have to face. The dialogue between them is a battle between rational and unreasonable thinking, where Juliet is aware of the situation whereas Romeo isn’t.

    Juliet: “I would not for the world they saw thee here.”

    Romeo: “I have night’s cloak to hide me from their eyes,
    And, but thou love me, let them find me here.
    My life were better ended by their hate
    Than death proroguèd, wanting of thy love.”

    In these few lines of text, we see Romeo being irrational again, saying that he would want the Capulet’s to take his life. It goes to show what type of character he is: if he wants something, he won’t waste any time to get it. It is interesting that Shakespeare makes these two people who love each other so much, so different.

    Reply
  9. Hannah M.

    In Act 2 scene 2 we learn some things about both, Romeo and Juliet. In lines 52-111 we see that Juliet has more a concern for Romeos life being on the line. She explains that if someon were to find him roaming around with Juliet, a Capulet and Romeo being a Montague, he would be killed. Juliet loves Romeo too much for this to happen therefore she worries much about that fact. On the other hand. Romeo is blinded by his love for his “angle”, Juliet to realize what the consequences may be if they are together. If he doesn’t realize, soon enough he’ll figure it out, either with his life or someone else’s. Romeo explains how he would much rather be killed by the hatred of the Capulets then wait to be loved by Juliet and know she feels the same way(which we know she does).

    Reply
  10. Mikayla Friedman

    The lines that Romeo and Juliet say in act II scene ii reveal a lot about their personalities. For instance, Juliet is cautious for good reasons, yet she is also head over heels for Romeo, and so she is worried about his well being. She says:
    “If they do see thee, they will murder thee.” (line 75)
    Juliet wonders how Romeo even got into her garden, and she knows what the punishment will be if Romeo is found on the Capulet grounds. Therefore, she warns him, but he does not return her fear. Romeo proceeds to say:
    “Alack, there lies more peril in thine eye
    Than twenty of their swords. look thou but sweet,
    And I am proof against their enmity.” (lines 76-78)
    I think this means that if you [Juliet] love me [Romeo], then I cannot be hurt by a sword. This is sweet, but I think Romeo is so overcome with love that he does not realize the consequences of what might happen if he is found with Juliet. Juliet, on the other hand, loves Romeo so much that she is persistent in telling him that he could be killed.

    What I found most interesting was that at the end of this scene, Juliet’s initial worry is washed away. Despite despite earlier concerns, she tells Romeo to call for her tomorrow if she wants to marry him! This would be the worst thing they could do, and it would anger their families more than anything! Juliet must love Romeo an incredible amount to disregard everything she just warned him about and propose the idea of marriage.

    Reply
    1. Madi R.

      I agree! I also found it interesting that her worries washed away after a few minutes of conversation with Romeo.

      Reply
  11. Madi R.

    The reader can infer a lot about Romeo and Juliet by comparing their use of language. Romeo appears to be a fantasizer. For instance, when Romeo expresses, “With love’s light wings did I o’erperch these walls, for stony limits cannot hold love out, And what love can do, that dares love attempt. Therefore thy kinsmen are no stop to me.” Romeo is stateing that stone walls can not keep him out, because he loves Juliet. Additionally, he said that Juliet’s family can not stop him from loving her. On the other hand, Juliet appears to be a rationalist. For example, Juliet is worried about Romeo being caught by her family. “If they do see thee they will murder thee.” Juliet cares about Romeo, but realizes that if her realatives did catch them then Romeo has a good chance of being killed.

    Reply
  12. trinityt

    In Act II, scene ii, lines 52-111 of Romeo and Juliet, we can see the differences between the two lovers. When Romeo confessed his love for her, beside feeling happy, Juliet was also concerned about Romeo’s well being. “If they do see thee, they will murder thee.” Juliet was worried that if one of her kinsmen finds Romeo there, they would kill him. This shows that Juliet is realistic about the situation.
    While Juliet is the realistic type, Romeo doesn’t worry about a thing because he was so in love with Juliet that all he could think about was his dear love, Juliet.

    Romeo:
    With love’s light wings did I o’erperch these walls,
    For stony limits cannot hold love out,
    And what love can do, that dares love attempt.
    Therefore thy kinsmen are no stop to me.

    Romeo is saying that their love (love between Romeo and Juliet) can beat whatever is in the way and nothing could harm them because of their love. However, realistically, their love can’t really save Romeo from swords. This shows that Romeo is so in love with Juliet that all he could think about was Juliet and, well, love. Romeo is in a love daze state, so he doesn’t think realistically. By being reckless like this, he can be putting both his and Juliet’s life in danger.

    Yet, Romeo and Juliet does have something alike in this scene. It’s that they both love each other, and wanting to believe that everything would be okay.

    Reply
    1. Emma Garbowitz

      I like how you compared Romeo and Juliet to “types of people” like the realistic one and the dreamer. The way you described them suits their personalities well and is very relatable to their conversation.

      Reply
  13. josepha4

    Throughout Act 2 scene 2 Romeo and Juliet’s separate personalities come to light. Juliet is the more sensible one who has a more realistic view on their situation. She says, “If they see thee, they will murder thee.” Romeo on the other hand is blinded by his new found love and disregards Juliet’s comment only to captivate her with his words. Again Juliet brings up the issue of their feuding families, “Tis but thy name that is my enemy” Then finally Romeo convinces her that their love is worth any risk and if their love is true it will withstand their families hatred and protect them from any harm. Then they decide to get married. ” If that thy bent of love be honorable, Thy purpose marriage, send me word tomorrow.” Unfortunately both Romeo and Juliet perish due to their feuding families and there love for each other.

    Reply
  14. Zoe

    In Act II, scene ii Juliet and Romeo share their love, however, they respond to each other in different ways. Romeo is more surrounded by the idea of his love and loves Juliet so much that all he thinks about is her and the way she is in the world around him.

    Romeo:
    The brightness of her cheek would shame those stars
    As daylight doth a lamp; her eye in heaven
    Would through the airy region stream so bright
    That birds would sing and think it were not night.

    Juliet, on the other hand, is thinking about what to do in the future because of their love. She thinks not of what is happening at the moment, but how things will turn out. She talks to Romeo about how he could be murdered if he stays with her and thinks to herself about the importance of his name and how she should be swept away to become a Montague.

    Juliet:
    And the place is death, considering who thou art,
    If any of my kinsmen find thee here

    Juliet and Romeo have a balance of being irrational (Romeo) and rational (Juliet). Romeo uses her heart to think and Juliet uses her brain to save them from disaster. I believe once Juliet stops thinking and finally gives in is when the problems will begin to start. This scene is definitely a very important one in the play and it really gives us more information on how Juliet and Romeo’s love will be.

    Reply
  15. Emma Garbowitz

    During this excerpt from lines 52-111 in Act II Scene ii in Romeo and Juliet you can clearly see their concerns about their love; more specifically Juliet’s concerns. Juliet is very concerned that she and Romeo will be caught by her family or their guards. She understands the consequences of their love and seems to be terribly worried by them, yet her love overpowers her worry and nervousness because she cares about Romeo so much. The text states,
    “The orchard walls are hard to climb,
    And the place of death, considering who thou art,
    If any Kinsmen find thee here.”
    This quote shows how Juliet truly cares about Romeo and wants nothing to happen to him or herself. Yet, Romeo feels as though nothing can hurt them as long as they are in love. And even if they die, he (Romeo) dies loving Juliet and she (Juliet) dies loving Romeo. The text states,
    “I have night’s cloak to hide me from their sight;
    And but thou love me, let them find me here:
    My life were better ended by their hate,
    Than death prorogued, wanting of thy love.”
    This shows how willing Romeo is willing to die just for the sake of his love for Juliet. However, Juliet obviously doesn’t want this to happen so she is concerned that they will be caught and killed if people find out a Capulet and Montugue are in love. Juliet’s concerns are in fact reasonable and do correspond to the situation very well. It is completely understandable that because her life is at risk she has her doubts. Moreover, at the same time I believe her connection with Romeo and their loving bond is too strong for them to be apart so therefore, Juliet cannot be so focused on her concerns but rather to live in the moment and focus on the current love she has with Romeo for as long as she possibly can.

    Reply
  16. Emily

    In these scenes we see how they feel about each other as well as the fears they have for their love. One main difference between Romeo and Juliet is that Juliet has more fears than Romeo. Whereas Romeo does not think that their families will become an issue, Juliet is more realistic. She thinks that her family will find a way to be a problem and that they have to be extremely careful to avoid them. Romeo on the other hand, is blinded by his love and he thinks that as long as he loves her nothing else matters. He says that he will abandon his name and they can just celebrate their love.

    Reply
  17. Maddie

    In these lines of Act II, scene ii of “Romeo and Juliet”, Romeo stumbles upon Juliet while she is getting ready for bed. They have a conversation, and in the conversation their biggest concern is their names. They are worried that one will never be accepted by the others family, simply because they are a Montague or a Capulet. “My name, dear saint, is hateful to myself because it is an enemy to thee.” In this quote Romeo says that he hates his own name because it separates him from Juliet. We see that Juliet is more aware and thoughtful about the problem at hand, while Romeo seems less concerned and more certain that things will end up okay. The one solution that they have for this problem is to no longer go by “Montague” or “Capulet”. They think that if they are not bound by name to their family, they will be able to be together without so much controversy. While reading this, I realized that the more they talked about their love, the less worried they became. It was almost as if telling each other that things would work out reassured them that it was true.

    Reply
  18. johnh1

    Romeo as we’ve inferred before is very dramatic and feels love for Juliet. He lives in his own little world where he and Juliet are the only things. He uses ton of metaphors and gestures of love. He announces himself at the home of his enemy just to proclaim his love. Juliet tries to be more realistic, actually thinking about the consequences of their love. I think this contributes to the theme of duality. Where Romeo is a careless lover, Juliet is more level-headed. However, there is a small crack in how Juliet acts. Whenever she is with Romeo she can’t stay away from him. She is stated as having exiting several times. However, she keeps coming back into the scene to say final words to him but people act weird sometimes so it isn’t too much of a flaw.

    Reply
  19. Sophie

    Within act 2 scene 2, there is so much action that it helps us get more insight to Romeo and Juliet as individuals. Romeo is more carefree and eager to start a relationship with his love. He totally disregards the fact that their families are complete enemies, and also the way he comes across to her (such as their first kiss) is kind of assertive. He is in for the physical aspect of it, but he didn’t even have time to get to know her personality yet. He is also of a very determined nature. He was very eager to find the perfect girl to fall in love with, so he went to the masquerade with no remorse that is was a Capulet party. Furthermore, when Juliet was hesitant to fall in love because of the obvious elephant in the room, he said “With love’s light wings did I o’erperch these walls, For stony limits cannot hold love out, And what love can do that dares love attempt, Therefore thy kinsmen are no stop to me… My life were better ended by their hate, Than death prorogued wanting of thy love” (p. 74-75) That pretty much means that he would rather die and have had fallin in love, than have had no love at all.
    In Juliet’s character, we see a change in within herself. At first, she acts very mature and hesitant to jump into love. It’s kind of ironic, how Juliet is many years younger than Romeo but seems to be more mature. She also thinks on the practical side, that it would be almost impossible to be in a relationship because their relatives are trying to murder the opposing family on a daily basis. The change we see in her is the agreement to make their relationship permanent. She forgets about their clashing families, and gives Romeo the love that he envisioned. They say love can blind you, and that’s very true. Romeo’s blindness is metaphorically contagious and soon enough, Juliet is the same frivolous way. Finally at the end of the scene, she tells him to return the next day at 9, and they can plan their future from there.

    Reply
  20. Brishti

    A major difference between Romeo and Juliet is their views and thoughts on their current situation. Juliet frets and worries about the possibility of being caught, whereas Romeo insists that he is safe simply because he is in love. Whereas Juliet is careful and cautious, Romeo is reckless and carefree. This also shows something else about their personality traits: Juliet backs up and sees the bigger picture, whereas Romeo just looks at it briefly and shrugs it off. These personality traits will become important as the story develops. The traits will ultimatley become their folly which ultimately causes their relationship to fail. Romeo, being the reckless one, will do something that will land himself in trouble, and Juliet will have to think of a creative and witty solution out of it. Thus, the naive recklessness of their actions will cause them to take their lives, like it says in the Prologue.

    Reply
  21. Maxwell Watson

    Here in this scene, Juliet questions why Romeo must be her enemy. She refuses to believe that Romeo is defined by being a Montague, and therefore implies that the two of them can love each other without fear of the social repercussions. But language as an expression of social institutions such as family, politics, or religion cannot be dismissed so easily because no other character in the play is willing to dismiss them.

    Reply
  22. Hannah Pitkofsky

    Tonight’s reading goes deeper into the personalities and romance of the two lovebirds in Romeo and Juliet. We see the differences between them even in these few lines:

    JULIET: How camest thou hither, tell me,
    and wherefore?
    The orchard walls are high and hard to climb,
    And the place death, considering who thou art,
    If any of my kinsmen find thee here.
    ROMEO: With love’s light wings did I o’er-perch
    these walls;
    For stony limits cannot hold love out,
    And what love can do that dares love attempt;
    Therefore thy kinsmen are no let to me.
    JULIET: If they do see thee, they will murder thee.
    ROMEO Alack, there lies more peril in thine eye
    Than twenty of their swords: look thou but sweet,
    And I am proof against their enmity.

    JULIET: I would not for the world they saw thee here.
    ROMEO: I have night’s cloak to hide me from their sight;
    And but thou love me, let them find me here:
    My life were better ended by their hate,
    Than death prorogued, wanting of thy love.

    Juliet is being very cautious about their midnight romance, however, Romeo is very daring and shows Juliet that nothing will keep them apart, no matter how high the walls, or how deep the river is between them. I think the balance between caution and daring are important in a relationship because the other person can balance each other out, and that is exactly what Romeo and Juliet did during Act II, scene ii.

    Reply

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