March 8

It is arguable that in Juliet, Shakespeare created a new model for the romantic heroine, courageous and resourceful, someone whose personality would be at home in the 21st century.

Tonight please read “Juliet Trumps Laura,” which is attached to our class homework calendar, if you lost the one I gave out in class.  Then, consider that article, our class activity, and most importantly the text itself to respond to the following question:

What can you learn about Romeo and Juliet from what they say and do and the way that they react and respond to each other. What does this repartee between Romeo and Juliet demonstrate about each of their characters and about their future relationship? Remember to use evidence from the text to support your answer.

This is a deceptively complicated question, so take time to consider the question, the sonnet, and the article “Juliet Trumps Laura” carefully.

R&J blog #8


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Posted March 8, 2019 by equinson in category Romeo and Juliet

22 thoughts on “It is arguable that in Juliet, Shakespeare created a new model for the romantic heroine, courageous and resourceful, someone whose personality would be at home in the 21st century.

  1. Sunna

    Romeo and Juliet are two of the most iconic characters in literary history, and the way they speak to and treat each other shows the reader a lot about both of them as characters. In the article, “Juliet Trumps Laura: Shakespeare and the Petrarchan Sonnet”, the author talks about the “Petrarchan lover” in stories. This is the man that loves the woman who is always out of reach. He is miserable without her, knowing that he can never be with her. There is also the “Petrarchan lady”, a woman who is a “the lady-on-a-pedestal”, as the article describes it. She is constantly out of reach, and doesn’t engage with the Petrarchan lover at all. I feel that Romeo is very much like a Petrarchan lover, but that Juliet is in no way a Petrarchan lady. Romeo is constantly complaining and wishing that Rosaline would love him back. He says:

    “Romeo: Is love a tender thing? It is too rough,
    Too rude, too boist’rous, and it pricks like thorn.”
    (Act I, scene IV)

    On the other hand, Juliet is the complete opposite of a Petrarchan lady. She refuses to be passive in the slightest. Instead of staying silent and simply letting things happen around her, Juliet engages with Romeo in their witty banter. An example of this is:

    “Romeo: Give me my sin again.
    Juliet: You kiss by th’ book.”
    (Act I, scene V)

    This will most certainly impact Romeo and Juliet’s future relationship. After all, Romeo was so used to his love not being returned. Rosaline was always simply a distant dream to him, someone so far out of his reach. However, Juliet clearly returns the feelings that he has for her. He may not be used to this, but could also be pleasantly surprised at a woman who says what she thinks.

    Reply
  2. jane

    In the article, “Juliet Trumps Laura”, Juliet is compared with Laura. Laura is a made-up character that was supposed to be the ideal woman in the fourteenth century. Women were supposed to sit looking pretty on a pedestal for men to admire and love from afar. Women were supposed to be cold, never fall in love, and never to respond to anyone that loved them. After reading Act I of “Romeo and Juliet”, the readers can already see the stark contrast between Laura and Juliet. Unlike Laura, Juliet was having a sincere conversation with Romeo. In scene v we can see that she is playing with Romeo a bit, but wants to kiss him just as much as he wants to kiss her.

    Already I think that there are several examples of duality throughout the text. First, I feel that Laura and Juliet have elements of duality. In the play, I think that the character Rosaline resembles Laura in the play. She ignores Romeo, and makes him feel sick since he loves her so much. Juliet on the other hand, takes to Romeo, has a full conversation with him, and kisses him twice. The concept of duality between Juliet and the average woman of the time makes her stand out more. In the movies, Juliet stood out by wearing brighter clothing, and having the camera follow her. But I believe that her different personality is Shakespeare’s way of making her stand out.

    Second, I believe that the nurse at the end of the scene is symbolism for the Capulet-Montague feud. As Juliet and Romeo are busy kissing and falling in love, the nurse interrupts them.

    Romeo:

    Sin from my lips? O trespass sweetly urged!
    Give me my sin again.

    Juliet:

    You kiss by th’ book.

    Nurse:

    Madam, your mother craves a word with you.

    (Page 59)

    The nurse interrupting Romeo and Juliet symbolizes the hate between the two families. Instead of being able to love each other in peace, the nurse interrupts them, much like how Romeo and Juliet’s love is interrupted by the hate of their families. This is another example of duality in the play since their love pauses the hate, but the two lovers are interrupted by the hate. The two key elements of the play balance each other out. This creates a stressful tension, one that will be very significant in the plot, that will tempt the characters to make rash, harsh decisions.

    Reply
  3. Maddie

    In the article, “Juliet trumps Laura”, we learn a lot about the relationship of Romeo and Juliet, and how it is different than most relationships of the time. Normally, a man will love a woman from afar, by confessing his love but getting no response from the woman. At times, the man and women never meet each other in real life. This is the case with Laura and Petrarch. This is what love was often like, but not with Romeo and Juliet. An example of equality shown between Romeo and Juliet is when they share a sonnet, each speaking the same number of lines. They talk to each other in person, and have already shared a kiss, within minutes of knowing each other. This shows that they have true love, because they are able to defy what is “normal” or “expected” of them. This shows that they will have a strong future relationship with each other.

    Reply
    1. Mikayla Friedman

      I really like how you connected Romeo and Juliet’s interaction to true love! I never thought about it, but the fact that they defy tradition definitely shows their true love.

      Reply
  4. caseyz

    Romeo and Juliet’s relationship is very different than the other relationships we have seen so far in the novel. When we first meet Romeo, he is depressed because he is in love with a girl, who we now know is Rosaline, and he can’t move on. He is upset that he can’t be with her, similar to how Francesco Petrarch talks about Laura in his sonnets. Laura is the lady on a pedestal and never makes an effort to even talk to Francesco. The fact that Juliet “steps off her pedestal” and talks to Romeo immediately makes their relationship different from Laura’s and Petrarch’s.

    Romeo: If I profane with my unworthiest hand
    This holy shrine, the gentle fine is this:
    My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand
    To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss

    Juliet: Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much,
    Which mannerly devotion shows in this;
    For saints have hands that pilgrims’ hands do touch,
    And palm to palm is holy palmers’ kiss.

    When they speak to each other, they alternate by speaking the same number of lines each time. This shows how different Laura is then Juliet. Laura sits there and lets Petrarch write sonnets for her and express his love for her but she never acknowledges it. By speaking the same number of lines, Juliet is expressing the same amount of love Romeo is expressing to her, unlike Laura.

    Reply
  5. maxwellw

    We can gain some information on Juliet based on how she acted with Romeo and based on the “Juliet Trumps Laura” article. In this scene, it’s almost as if Juliet is on an equal playing field with Romeo, flirting back with him and acting as if she might be accepting his advances. In contrast to the archetypal Petrarchan lady, Juliet is not put on much of a pedestal and doesn’t remain “passive” to Romeo’s flirting. Juliet even goes as far as to invite Romeo to kiss him again when she says, “Then have my lips the sin that they have took,”. Shakespeare may be using these actions to show that Juliet will be playing a more involved role in this relationship/story and will have some of her own autonomy as a character and not just be an idea for Romeo to pursue.

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  6. johnh1

    Juliet is not a typical Heroine of the day. The average one would be petrarchan. Meaning she would be cold and distant. However, Juliet is very much a participant in the relationship. She actually meets and talks to Romeo and sees herself as in love. She also goes through struggles with it. For example:
    Juliet:
    My only love sprung from my only hate!
    Too early seen unknown, and known too late!
    Prodigious birth of love it is to me,
    That I must love a loathed enemy

    She acts similar to Romeo. She falls in love and struggles. Unlike Petrarchan women, Juliet is a character, not a thing.

    Reply
  7. Kate Ma.

    We can learn a lot about Romeo and Juliet through scene five, the movies and “Juliet Trumps Laura”. Through Juliet’s conversation with Romeo in scene five we can see a different side of her. During this scene we learn more of Romeo’s personality. Romeo acts sly, approaching Juliet with clever wordplay and tries to get personal. In the beginning I viewed Juliet as an obedient girl listening to her mother talk about getting to know Paris. Yet, after her conversation with Romeo I now see that she is just as sly as Romeo. For example, Juliet states reasons why Romeo shouldn’t kiss her, “Ay, pilgrim, lips that they must use in prayer.” She didn’t back away from Romeo, but she stayed in the conversation which surprised me. Juliet is the kind of girl that is willing to take chances and break the mold if she thinks it is worth it. She will not mess up a good opportunity to just live life and be in love for real to follow her parents wishes. She knows what is best for her, showing how she is nothing like Laura, in “Juliet trumps Laura.” Laura is basically an object, out of reach, yet Juliet is an actual being that makes decisions. For example, in the sonnet, at first she was skeptical, but later, after she really saw how in love and devoted to her Romeo was, she decided to give the relationship a chance. During their conversation, Juliet becomes witty and verbally bold, matching Romeo’s lines, not breaking stride, and pulling him closer. Juliet is not only rebelling against her family name, but also against the ideas of society. She jumps off “the pedestal” and exhibits her eager, willing, but still very smart personality. Shakespeare creates a strong female in his plays unlike “Petrarchan lady”.

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  8. trinityt

    From reading the article “Juliet Trumps Laura” and from the text, I learned that the relationship between Romeo and Juliet is different from the other relationships at the time. According to the “Juliet Trumps Laura” article, “Juliet is no Petrarchan lady. She does not stay on that pedestal for a heartbeat.” At the time, love relationships were seen as “the-lady-on-a-pedestal” idea, which is where a man confesses his love for a woman, but the woman doesn’t return the man’s love. For example, Francesco Petrarch wrote more than 300 sonnets to Laura, the woman that he loves, but Laura doesn’t return his love. This is similar to when Romeo loved Rosaline because he was in love with her, but she doesn’t return his feeling, therefore, Romeo suffered from it. However, Juliet is not the typical lady-on-a-pedestal type. When Romeo was engaging a conversation and flirting with Juliet at the feast, she didn’t “stay on that pedestal”. Instead, unlike Laura, she “matches him with witty comebacks and even hints that his advances are welcome.” Both of them were engaged in the conversation and the “wooing”.

    Romeo:
    If I profane with my unworthiest hand
    This holy shrine, the gentle sin is this:
    My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand
    To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss.

    Juliet:
    Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much,
    Which mannerly devotion shows in this;
    For saints have hands that pilgrims’ hands do touch,
    And palm to palm is holy palmers’ kiss.

    (Page 57, lines 104-111).

    Both of Romeo and Juliet are speaking to each other, unlike how Petrarch kept writing sonnets for his love, Laura, yet she doesn’t acknowledge it. This shows that Romeo and Juliet’s relationship includes efforts from the both of them, which is different from Petrarch and Laura’s relationship where one doesn’t acknowledge the other’s love and is passive.

    Reply
  9. Myles Ng

    In scene 5 we see the personalities of Romeo and Juliet. The way Romeo approaches Juliet is unlike the expected approaches of the time. The women of the time were supposed to be admired and loved from a distance and give no acknowledgement to the man. As we can see she does quite the opposite and engages Romeo in word play. She acts distant in some cases, but you can tell she does not really mean it. Juliet’s character is one that matches Romeo’s in wit and cunning. She tells her mother she doesn’t look for love, but within minutes of talking to Romeo they have already shared two kisses. Romeo approaches her with h=what seems to be the start of a sonnet and Juliet continues the sonnet. Them sharing a kiss and continuing the sonnet shows the blossoming of a relationship, but much like Romeo and Juliet’s story it is cut short. This is shown by the nurse interrupting the sonnet and is foreshadowing the ending of the relationship.

    Reply
  10. Laila

    The dialogue between Romeo and Juliet is different between any other dialogue between any two characters in the play. For starters, when the two first meet, they converse in sonnet form. It is almost like they’re two pieces of a puzzle, and when they speak together, it makes a whole.
    With Juliet’s character, Shakespeare introduces a new romantic female heroine, different from any before. By comparing Juliet to Laura, we can see how different the two ladies are. Laura had over 300 Petrarchan sonnets written for her, meaning that she was very distant. Francesco Petrarch, the writer of those sonnets, continuously expressed his love for Laura while she remained cold and unresponsive. Many poets were inspired by Petrarch and began writing about women like Laura. Back then, almost every love story portrayed a man chasing after a woman who is out of reach. Shakespeare was doing something completely new by creating a bold, female lover like Juliet. Instead of acting cool and unwelcoming, she challenged Romeo with her witty, quick responses, leading him on. This shows a new type of relationship that wasn’t very common in Shakespeare’s day, an equal relationship.

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  11. Emma Garbowitz

    I learned a lot about Romeo and Juliet’s character after they interacted with each other and talked. First of all, after seeing the pair converse even though they know they shouldn’t be with each other, I understood they would do anything for love. Between the two of them, their love triumphs over their fear of getting caught. The text states,
    “My only love sprung from my only hate!
    Too early seen unknown, and known too late!
    Prodigious birth of love It is to me
    That I must love a loathed enemy.”
    This quote shows the tension between Romeo and Juliet’s families, the Capulets and the Montagues. But it also shows that Juliet is willing to risk everything just to be with her one, true love Romeo.
    On the other hand, in class we reviewed another written account based on Francesco Petrarch and Laura. Basically, Laura is a made-up character that is supposed to be the ideal woman during the fourteenth century. Then there is this man, Francesco Petrarch who loved this woman so much yet he could not be with her. Women were just meant to be looked at and loved from far away. However, they were not supposed to fall in love with anyone themselves. So, Laura never talked to him or ever attempted to make an appearance to see him. The difference between her and Juliet was that she never even tried to talk to Petrarch. Juliet was at least bold enough to state how she felt and talk to Romeo.
    Furthermore, based on the way Juliet responded to Romeo, you can tell a lot about her character. She was almost going along with Romeo’s game and was playing hard to get. This shows she is witty and a pretty bright child. Also, you can tell how sweet and innocent Juliet is when she talks to Romeo. She honestly doesn’t want to cause trouble or do anything wrong to harm herself or her family. But you can truly tell how strong her feelings are towards Romeo and how she really wants to be with him (although she can’t let her family know). Based on this, you can tell that Romeo and Juliet’s relationship will go far. Seeing how they talk to each other they will stay by each other’s sides and love each other mutually. They obviously care about each other and will do anything at any cost to be with each other. Therefore, you can learn about the personalities of Romeo and Juliet based on this scene in the play.

    Reply
  12. Mikayla Friedman

    Romeo and Juliet’s first interaction reveals a lot about their characters. First, we see the Romeo likes to be with the ladies! He just talked about how he loves Rosaline, but now she is old and Juliet is who Romeo is focused on! In addition, Juliet responds to Romeo’s witty remarks about saints and sins and hands and kissing. She almost invites him to keep flirting with her by not walking away, and she does a good deal of flirting herself! She says:
    “For saints have hands that pilgrims’ hands do touch,
    And palm to palm is holy palmers’ kiss.” (Act 1. sc. 5)

    Also after they kiss for the second time, she says:
    You kiss by th’ book.” (Act 1. sc. 5)

    The way that Romeo and Juliet converse with each other foreshadows what their relationship will be like. It won’t be Romeo admiring Juliet from afar, or Juliet doing whatever Romeo says without hesitation. I think this relationship will be equal for Romeo and Juliet based on their conversation and how Juliet didn’t back down from Romeo. This is very unusual, considering the “Petrarchan lover” was the norm for this time period. Francesco Petrarch was a poet who wrote many sonnets addressed to a woman named Laura. Petrarch never met Laura, he just loved her from a distance, which means he had to have loved her for her beauty because she he didn’t know what she was like. For all he knew, she could have been horribly mean! This type of love was common, which is why Romeo loved Rosaline from afar. But this is not the case with Juliet. They have already interacted with each other, and I’m sure they will continue to have meaningful conversations. I think this is just another way that Shakespeare shows Juliet is different from most women of her time. I am curious to see how Romeo and Juliet’s relationship will play itself out.

    Reply
  13. stephaniec

    Back “in those days”, women were seen as untouchable. They were loved from afar and would remain cold, distant, and unattainable.

    At the beginning of the play, Romeo is in love with Rosaline. However, we have never seen them engage in even one conversation. But even so, Romeo’s love for her has put him in a state of despair.
    On the other hand, in Romeo and Juliet’s love story, Romeo confidently approached Juliet, and used the words of a sonnet to entice her. Juliet, unlike most women, responded to Romeo’s act of love and she too, responded in a sonnet. After a lot of flirting and witty banter, they kiss twice, confirming their feeling are mutual. However, they were interrupted by the nurse. This is most likely foreshadowing to how their feuding families are going to intrude on their relationship.

    Reply
  14. Emily

    After reading Juliet Trumps Laura and Act 1. scene 5 of Romeo and Juliet, the readers learn more about Juliet’s character and also the message that Shakespeare is portraying. After reading these two passages the readers learn how Juliet is more independent and equal than Laura. The very fact that she actually responds to Romeo shows how she is his equal, rather than his inferior. This is a revolutionary idea because it shows how Shakespeare is saying that both genders should be equal. He is also resurfacing the idea of duality because not only do we have to duo between Romeo and Juliet, we also have the duality between them and their families. They signify the hope for society. A place where man and women are equal, and where they can “bury their parents’ strife”. They are not thinking of what families they belong to, but rather that they love each other. Love is a unifying force and Shakespeare is telling the audience that they need to accept love in all of the forms that it appears in.

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  15. Hannah Pitkofsky

    In the article, “Juliet Trumps Laura”, we learn a lot about love and romance from the time that the play of Romeo and Juliet takes place, and how the love between them changed the ideal and the expected from lovers at the time. Around the time that the play takes place, men would admire a girl from afar, like what Romeo did to Rosaline. In Act I, scene iv, Benvolio and Romeo states,

    Benvolio: At this same ancient feast of Capulet’s
    Sups the fair Rosaline whom thou so lovest,
    With all the admired beauties of Verona:
    Go thither; and, with unattainted eye,
    Compare her face with some that I shall show,
    And I will make thee think thy swan a crow.

    Romeo: When the devout religion of mine eye
    Maintains such falsehood, then turn tears to fires;
    And these, who often drown’d could never die,
    Transparent heretics, be burnt for liars!
    One fairer than my love! the all-seeing sun
    Ne’er saw her match since first the world begun.

    Benvolio: Tut, you saw her fair, none else being by,
    Herself poised with herself in either eye:
    But in that crystal scales let there be weigh’d
    Your lady’s love against some other maid
    That I will show you shining at this feast,
    And she shall scant show well that now shows best.

    Benvolio is showing to us how men of the time would show their love for a woman, however, with Juliet, Romeo does something that men of the time would not attempt to do. Romeo went in and attempted to win Juliet’s heart through action, grabbing her and getting her to kiss him. During Act I, scene v, Romeo states:

    If I profane with my
    unworthiest hand
    This holy shrine, the gentle fine is this:
    My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand
    To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss.

    Juliet eventually does kiss him, showing that Romeo’s risk paid off and that the two have sparked a fire that no one has lit before. In “Juliet Trumps Laura”, Laura responds with nothing. She didn’t have the same response to Shakespeare as Juliet had to Romeo. Romeo and Juliet’s beginning of their relationship shows that they will be together for a while, because they began with a bang and the spark never dies.

    Reply
  16. Madi R.

    The reader can learn a lot about Romeo and Juliet through their conversations and actions. Romeo and Juliet’s realationship is very unique because Juliet responds to Romeo differently than how most women respond to a suitor at the time. Romeo’s realationship with Rosaline was a more common realationship. Rosalines did not acknowledge Romeo’s love for her. On the contrary Juliet not only acknowledged Romeo’s affection, she also engaged in conversation with him frilled with sly commentary and witty comebacks. Additionally, the way their interactions are filled with witty comments and quick replies dementstrates how Romeo and Juliet are connected. The article “Juliet Trumps Laura” compares Juliet and Laura, a girl that the poet, Francesco Petrarch has written numerous sonnets for. Laura never responded to Francesco and does not return his love. The article introduces the reader to the way realationships were during the time of the play. The common practice of how women respond to a man’s affection during the time period is called “lady on the pedestal”. This practice is more like Romeo and Rosaline’s relationship. However, Juliet and Romeo’s relationship is very different. For example, on lines 119-121:
    Juliet
    Then have my lips the sin that they took.
    Romeo
    Sin from my lips? O trespass sweetly urged!
    Give my sin again.
    Romeo and Juliet’s wordplay show how their relationship is a shared affection.

    Reply
  17. Hannah McK

    In the reading Juliet trumps Laura we learn the different meanings of love. People have many different opinions on love and how people love one another. Laura and Petrarch’s love is confusing. Petrarch messages Laura constantly and yet Laura never responds. Although Laura doesn’t respond Petrarch continues to message Laura because he lives her. He lives her yet he doesn’t even know her. He FEELS like he loves her and deep down he knows that his love for her is real and he doesn’t even have to speak to her to do so. In comparison, Romeo and Juliet’s love is more real life. Their relationship is equal and they share respect for one another. For example, in the sonnet they each had the same number of lines and in each line you can tell they love each other. They say they’re two star crossed lovers that fell in love. I say it’s true love and it’s way more than that. They even kissed each other already after only sharing a few words.

    Reply
  18. Zoe

    After reading”Juliet Trumps Laura” you can clearly see the big difference between the two lovers. Laura is created in stories involving a Petrarchan lover. This means the man is in love with a woman who is always out of reach. He writes letters to her and expects her to answer, but she never does. This is what creates the big difference between Laura and Juliet. When Romeo professes his love to her for the first time she immediately replies and they even end up kissing each other. Juliet is breaking free from the “lady on a pedestal” stereotype of girls. Shakespeare makes this point several times in the script. Juliet starts in her first scene by saying that she would only love who her mother told her to love.

    Juliet:
    I’ll look to like if looking liking move:
    But no more deep will I endart mine eye
    Than your consent gives strength to make it fly

    Although she really means this at the time and is becoming a woman who is only told what to do, she soon breaks her own rules once she sees Romeo. Instead of letting Romeo give her a beautiful sonnet, Juliet shares the quatrains with him and in the end, they both finish the last one.

    Romeo:
    If I profane with my unworthiest hand (A)
    This holy shrine, the gentle fine is this: (B)
    My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand (A)
    To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss. (B)

    Juliet:
    Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much, (C)
    Which mannerly devotion shows in this; (D)
    For saints have hands that pilgrims’ hands do touch, (C)
    And palm to palm is holy palmers’ kiss. (D)

    Saints do not move, though grant for prayers’ sake. (G)

    Romeo:
    Then move not, while my prayer’s effect I take. (G)

    The two lovers clearly create a new way of love in which both of them have an equal part in the story. This style has carried on to many plays and movies even today.

    Reply
  19. Sophie

    “Juliet Trumps Laura” helps me understand Romeo and Juliet’s relationship a little better. Romeo stands as more of a Petrarchan lover in the way he longs over Juliet and expresses his love through intense religion metaphors. However Juliet stands as less as a Petrarchan lover. “Juliet, far from remaining passive, matches him with witty comebacks and even hints that his advances are welcome.” (class hand out) Even though Laura and Juliet aren’t very similar, Francesco Petrarch and Romeo are. Both of them fell in love with someone because of their idealized beauty, without even knowing their personalities. If I didn’t know this play was going to end, I would probably think that their relationship was not going to work out. Falling in love at first sight and successfully keeping the relationship strong is kind of rare. Especially if you love somebody for their looks. However since I do know that Romeo and Juliet’s relationship works out, I am really excited for the story line to pick up and to see if Romeo’s Petrarchan love style will affect things at all.

    Reply
  20. angelicac1

    In Act I of Romeo and Juliet, readers are introduced to Romeo and Juliet. The star-crossed lovers grew a spark when Juliet fell in love with Romeo at the party that is thrown by his father. After only seeing each other for the first time, they proceed to talk to each other. While talking to each other, they sort of duel one another by comparing their relationship to things associated with religion, but Romeo and Juliet still manage to flirt. They grow a connection with one another upon their first meeting.
    In “Juliet Trumps Laura,” readers view Laura as a completely different character compared to Juliet. Unlike Juliet, Laura doesn’t interact with the one who continues to express his love for her. I believe that she made the decision to do that because she made her own choice and not since Laura doesn’t “see” him. At first, Juliet was reluctant on conversing with Romeo, but she allows herself to interact with him.

    Reply
  21. Brishti

    In Act 1, Scene 5 Romeo and Juliet are introduced to each other at the party held by the Capulets. From the way Romeo and Juliet talk to each other, you can see how they are flirtatious with each other and how they use their wits to win each other over. This demonstrates how in their relationship, Romeo and Juliet are equals, rather than having Romeo be the one falling after Juliet, who is cold, distant, and unattainable, like in most Petrarchan love stories. In this scene, they are witty and very good at communication, and they finish each other’s sentences and form a sonnet together. This demonstrates how in their furture relationship, it is ultimitely the fact that they are unable to communicate which leads to the demise of their relationship.
    The main reason why Juliet is completely different than Laura is because unlike most Petrachan lovers, Juliet interacts with Romeo and flirts back. This demonstratea how their lives end so short because of each other. If Juliet hadn’t interacted with Romeo in the first place, and if she had just ignored him and left, she could have lived her life long and happy, to a certain extent.

    Reply

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