March 28

That’s not how I see it….

Image result for chagall romeo and juliet image

Tonight, please write a response to today’s class period by answering the question below.   Please consider all the class discussion and analysis we’ve done regarding the play, the lithograph, and orchestral suite, to help you in your response.  As always, please follow the rules of standard written English and respond to at least one other comment in this thread.

In Shakespeare’s play, Prokofiev’s Romeo and Juliet Suite, and Chagall’s painting of Romeo and Juliet, the author, the composer and the artist structure their work with intention.  What aspects of Romeo and Juliet do Shakespeare, Prokofiev, and Chagall choose to emphasize and to leave absent?  What effect do these choices create when you consider them in context of the events of the play?

R&J blog #19
March 27

O my love, my wife!

Tonight you must finish reading the play and notice all the differences between the film (as far as we viewed it) and the the text.  Then, paraphrase and analyze Romeo’s soliloquy, Act V, scene iii.    What metaphors, references, and comparisons does he use?  How does this help the reader or audience member understand his anguish?  What insight about life and death is Shakespeare conveying to his audience?

O my love! my wife!
Death, that hath suck’d the honey of thy breath,
Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty:
Thou art not conquer’d; beauty’s ensign yet
Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,
And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.
Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet?
O, what more favour can I do to thee,
Than with that hand that cut thy youth in twain
To sunder his that was thine enemy?
Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,
Why art thou yet so fair? shall I believe
That unsubstantial death is amorous,
And that the lean abhorred monster keeps
Thee here in dark to be his paramour?
For fear of that, I still will stay with thee;
And never from this palace of dim night
Depart again: here, here will I remain
With worms that are thy chamber-maids; O, here
Will I set up my everlasting rest,
And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars
From this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last!
Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O you
The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss
A dateless bargain to engrossing death!
Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide!
Thou desperate pilot, now at once run on
The dashing rocks thy sea-sick weary bark!
Here’s to my love! [Drinks.]  O true apothecary!
Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die.          [Falls.]

R&J blog #18
March 26

O Woeful Day!

Related image

This evening, review the scenes we read in class today, (Act IV, scenes iv and v; and Act V, scenes i and ii).  Then, please paraphrase the lines below from Act IV, scene v.  Once you have finished rereading and paraphrasing, write a paragraph analyzing the friar’s responsibility for Romeo and Juliet’s ultimate deaths.  Make sure you include specific details from the text to support your analysis.

FRIAR LAURENCE:

Peace, ho, for shame! confusion’s cure lives not
In these confusions. Heaven and yourself
Had part in this fair maid; now heaven hath all,
And all the better is it for the maid:
Your part in her you could not keep from death,
But heaven keeps his part in eternal life.
The most you sought was her promotion;
For ’twas your heaven she should be advanced:
And weep ye now, seeing she is advanced
Above the clouds, as high as heaven itself?
O, in this love, you love your child so ill,
That you run mad, seeing that she is well:
She’s not well married that lives married long;
But she’s best married that dies married young.
Dry up your tears, and stick your rosemary
On this fair corse; and, as the custom is,
In all her best array bear her to church:
For though fond nature bids us an lament,
Yet nature’s tears are reason’s merriment.

R&J blog #17
March 25

Come, vial

Tonight, please read Act IV, scenes i, ii, and iii .  Then, please paraphrase and analyze the “Come, Vial” speech.  After your paraphase, analyze how Juliet has changed over the course of the play so far.

Come, vial.
What if this mixture do not work at all?
Shall I be married then to-morrow morning?
No, no: this shall forbid it: lie thou there.
[Laying down her dagger]
What if it be a poison, which the friar
Subtly hath minister’d to have me dead,
Lest in this marriage he should be dishonour’d,
Because he married me before to Romeo?
I fear it is: and yet, methinks, it should not,
For he hath still been tried a holy man.
How if, when I am laid into the tomb,
I wake before the time that Romeo
Come to redeem me? there’s a fearful point!
Shall I not, then, be stifled in the vault,
To whose foul mouth no healthsome air breathes in,
And there die strangled ere my Romeo comes?
Or, if I live, is it not very like,
The horrible conceit of death and night,
Together with the terror of the place,—
As in a vault, an ancient receptacle,
Where, for these many hundred years, the bones
Of all my buried ancestors are packed:
Where bloody Tybalt, yet but green in earth,
Lies festering in his shroud; where, as they say,
At some hours in the night spirits resort;—
Alack, alack, is it not like that I,
So early waking, what with loathsome smells,
And shrieks like mandrakes’ torn out of the earth,
That living mortals, hearing them, run mad:
O, if I wake, shall I not be distraught,
Environed with all these hideous fears?
And madly play with my forefather’s joints?
And pluck the mangled Tybalt from his shroud?
And, in this rage, with some great kinsman’s bone,
As with a club, dash out my desperate brains?
O, look! methinks I see my cousin’s ghost
Seeking out Romeo, that did spit his body
Upon a rapier’s point: stay, Tybalt, stay!
Romeo, I come! this do I drink to thee.

R&J blog #16
March 20

Hold thy desperate hand!

Image result for images of romeo in despair

Tonight please paraphrase and analyze Friar Laurence’s speech below.   Remember paraphrasing means translating into everyday modern English.  After you have completed your paraphrase provide some analysis of the Friar’s advice to and characterization of Romeo.   Don’t forget to include specific evidence from the text to support your ideas.

As always, be sure to follow the rules of standard English and comment on at least one other response in this thread.

FRIAR LAURENCE
Hold thy desperate hand:
Art thou a man? thy form cries out thou art:
Thy tears are womanish; thy wild acts denote
The unreasonable fury of a beast:
Unseemly woman in a seeming man!
Or ill-beseeming beast in seeming both!
Thou hast amazed me: by my holy order,
I thought thy disposition better temper’d.

What, rouse thee, man! thy Juliet is alive,
For whose dear sake thou wast but lately dead;
There art thou happy: Tybalt would kill thee,
But thou slew’st Tybalt; there are thou happy too:
The law that threaten’d death becomes thy friend
And turns it to exile; there art thou happy:
A pack of blessings lights up upon thy back;
Happiness courts thee in her best array;
But, like a misbehaved and sullen wench,
Thou pout’st upon thy fortune and thy love:
Take heed, take heed, for such die miserable.

R&J blog #15
March 19

Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?

Tonight, please read Act III, scene ii, and then analyze Juliet’s transformation in the section of the text I have copied below.  Explain how Juliet changes over the course of this section of the text, provide specific textual evidence of that transformation, and — here’s the tricky part!– make sure you show how that text really demonstrates the change.

As always, please follow the rules of standard written English and respond to at least one other comment in this thread.

JULIET
O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!
Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?
Beautiful tyrant! fiend angelical!
Dove-feather’d raven! wolvish-ravening lamb!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st,
A damned saint, an honourable villain!
O nature, what hadst thou to do in hell,
When thou didst bower the spirit of a fiend
In moral paradise of such sweet flesh?
Was ever book containing such vile matter
So fairly bound? O that deceit should dwell
In such a gorgeous palace!

Nurse
There’s no trust,
No faith, no honesty in men; all perjured,
All forsworn, all naught, all dissemblers.
Ah, where’s my man? give me some aqua vitae:
These griefs, these woes, these sorrows make me old.
Shame come to Romeo!

JULIET
Blister’d be thy tongue
For such a wish! he was not born to shame:
Upon his brow shame is ashamed to sit;
For ’tis a throne where honour may be crown’d
Sole monarch of the universal earth.
O, what a beast was I to chide at him!

Nurse
Will you speak well of him that kill’d your cousin?

JULIET
Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?
Ah, poor my lord, what tongue shall smooth thy name,
When I, thy three-hours wife, have mangled it?
But, wherefore, villain, didst thou kill my cousin?
That villain cousin would have kill’d my husband:
Back, foolish tears, back to your native spring;
Your tributary drops belong to woe,
Which you, mistaking, offer up to joy.
My husband lives, that Tybalt would have slain;
And Tybalt’s dead, that would have slain my husband:
All this is comfort; wherefore weep I then?
Some word there was, worser than Tybalt’s death,
That murder’d me: I would forget it fain;
But, O, it presses to my memory,
Like damned guilty deeds to sinners’ minds:
‘Tybalt is dead, and Romeo–banished;’
That ‘banished,’ that one word ‘banished,’
Hath slain ten thousand Tybalts. Tybalt’s death
Was woe enough, if it had ended there:
Or, if sour woe delights in fellowship
And needly will be rank’d with other griefs,
Why follow’d not, when she said ‘Tybalt’s dead,’
Thy father, or thy mother, nay, or both,
Which modern lamentations might have moved?
But with a rear-ward following Tybalt’s death,
‘Romeo is banished,’ to speak that word,
Is father, mother, Tybalt, Romeo, Juliet,
All slain, all dead. ‘Romeo is banished!’
There is no end, no limit, measure, bound,
In that word’s death; no words can that woe sound.

R&J blog #14
March 18

O, I am fortune’s fool!

Image result for image of romeo and mercutio

Tonight, after you finish reading Act III, scene i, of Romeo and Juliet please write your response here.  You have free choice of response, but please keep your comments grounded in the text and, unless you are the very first student to comment, respond to previous comments as a part of your comment.  In other words, let’s try to have an online conversation and see where it leads us!

As always, please check your writing for spelling, punctuation, and grammar.

R&J blog #13
March 15

It is enough I may but call her mine.

This evening, please paraphrase and then analyze Romeo’s speech below.  Next, you must then compare it to the Friar’s speech beneath it.

What perpetual truth does each speaker express in his lines?  What possible outcome does the imagery foreshadow in each quotation?

Don’t forget: you must analyze both speeches and comment on the analysis of your classmates as well.

Amen, amen! But come what sorrow can,
It cannot countervail the exchange of joy
That one short minute gives me in her sight.
Do thou but close our hand with holy words,
Then love-devouring death do what he dare –
It is enough I may but call her mine.
 
These violent delights have violent ends
And in their triumph die, like fire and powder,
Which as they kiss, consume.
The sweetest honey
Is loathsome in his own deliciousness
And in the taste confounds the appetite.
Therefore love moderately; long love doth so;
Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow.
 
R&J blog #12
March 14

Holy Saint Francis!

 

Tonight, please paraphrase and then analyze the speech below.  For your analysis, be sure to tell who said the quotation, to whom, and under what circumstances.   Be sure to focus on characterization, plot development, and theme.

As always, be sure to follow the rules of standard written English and don’t forget to respond to the analysis of your classmates as well.

Holy Saint Francis, what a change is here!
Is Rosaline, whom thou didst love so dear,
So soon forsaken? young men’s love then lies
Not truly in their hearts, but in their eyes.
Jesu Maria, what a deal of brine
Hath wash’d thy sallow cheeks for Rosaline!
How much salt water thrown away in waste,
To season love, that of it doth not taste!
The sun not yet thy sighs from heaven clears,
Thy old groans ring yet in my ancient ears;
Lo, here upon thy cheek the stain doth sit
Of an old tear that is not wash’d off yet:
If e’er thou wast thyself and these woes thine,
Thou and these woes were all for Rosaline:
And art thou changed? pronounce this sentence then,
Women may fall, when there’s no strength in men.

R&J blog #11
March 13

What man art thou that, thus bescreened in night, / So stumblest on my counsel?

What can you infer about Romeo and Juliet by comparing their use of language  in Act II, scene ii, lines 52-111? Consider their main concerns in this excerpt.  Be sure to use specific textual evidence to support your claim, and further, be sure to make clear how that evidence actually supports that claim.

As always, please be sure to follow the rules of standard in your writing and respond to at least one other comment in this thread.

R&J blog #10