December 11

All the little man on the witness stand had that made him any better than his nearest neighbors was, that if scrubbed with lye soap in very hot water, his skin was white.

After you have read chapters 16-17 of To Kill a Mockingbird, please respond on our blog:

  • What passage or passages strike you as interesting or singular and why?
  • What questions do you want to discuss with the class?
  • Why do you think these questions may generate interesting discussion?
  • Remember, a good discussion question does not have a single answer.  Good questions lead to interesting conversations.

Also remember to:

  • Annotate!  Annotate!  Annotate!  Use post-it notes to mark important passages and to write two or three discussion questions to direct our discussion tomorrow.  Remember!  Everyone must participate.
Mockingbird blog #7


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Posted December 11, 2018 by equinson in category To Kill a Mockingbird

35 thoughts on “All the little man on the witness stand had that made him any better than his nearest neighbors was, that if scrubbed with lye soap in very hot water, his skin was white.

  1. Myles Ng

    “All the little man on the witness stand had that made him any better than his nearest neighbors was, that if scrubbed with lye soap in very hot water, his skin was white.”

    I would like to discuss this paragraph and the whole trial. Bow Ewell is a man with little integrity. He has no moral right and wrong. He is a sexist, a racist, and is an all round bad guy. This is no different from what the town expects from the Ewell family. They are looked at as the human trash of the town. This trial shows that Scout has matured enough to see what a horrible person he is. Instead of being a blank slate and taking everything without bias, she has changed and become molded and is now able to see that he is bad. He is only making a grab at fame by accusing Tom and Scout can see this. She relizes the only reason he is treated differently is becaues:”if scrubbed with lye soap in very hot water, his skin was white.” The only reason he is treated differently is simply because he is white. This is racist and in this court case we can see that scout notices this.

    Reply
  2. Emily

    “Lemme tell you somethin’ now, Billy,” a third said, “you know the court appointed him to defend this nigger.”

    “Yeah, but Atticus aims to defend him. That’s what I don’t like about it.”

    This was news, news that put a different light on things: Atticus had to, whether he wanted to or not. I thought it odd that he hadn’t said anything to us about it — we could have used it many times in defending him and ourselves. He had to, that’s why he was doing it, equaled fewer fights and less fussing. But did that explain the town’s attitude? The court appointed Atticus to defend him. Atticus aimed to defend him. That’s what they didn’t like about it. It was confusing.”(p. 218)

    This scene immediately striked me as interesting and it seems like it is important. In this passage, the readers learn more about not only the morals of Atticus, but also about how Scout relates to her surroundings. When Scouts wonders why Atticus never said anything about the fact that he was defending Tom Robinson because he was forced to. Through Scout eyes, life would have been easier for her if she knew that she could have used the excuse of “Atticus has to” when she was explaining why he was defending a black person. However, as the reader we can analyze this and come to the conclusion that the reason that Atticus did not notify his children of this explanation was that he did not want them to think that it was the only reason that he was defending Tom Robinson. Although it is true that it is his duty as a lawyer to defend his client, Atticus also has other motivations. His core morals are that everyone is equal, and if he chose to not defend Tom then it would be going against his beliefs. Moreover, he would not want his children to see his reasoning as because he has to. He would much rather them to question society and the way that they are being treated because of racism. If Scout was to go around saying that Atticus is defending Tom because he is being forced to, rather than because it is the right thing for him to do, than she will most likely come to believe that this is the truth. Overall, Atticus forced his children to learn the true reason that he is defending Tom Robinson because he wants them to grow up and come to learn how horrible racism is.

    Reply
    1. Kate Ma.

      You bring up a very good point about Scout’s views and reaction to her surroundings through that quote that I didn’t even think of.

      Reply
    2. Emma Garbowitz

      “Yeah, but Atticus aims to defend him. That’s what I don’t like about it.”
      “This was news, news that put a different light on things: Atticus had to, whether he wanted to or not. I thought it odd that he hadn’t said anything to us about it— we could have used it many times in defending him and ourselves. He had to, that’s why he was doing it, equaled fewer fights and less fussing. But did that explain the town’s attitude? The court appointed Atticus to defend him. Atticus aimed to defend him.”

      I found this quote very interesting for many different reasons. This quote is saying that Atticus is defending Tom Robinson because its his obligation. It never says that Atticus volunteered or even wanted to pursue this case in the first place. He was forced to do it and knew he had to defend his client because it is his job. However, I don’t believe that this is the only reason why Atticus is actually trying to win this case. It obviously is his duty to be Tom’s lawyer and try to win the case but he didn’t have to do all the other things to help him as well. It might have been as small as a gesture of telling Scout not to say the word “nigger” or it could be as large as Atticus protecting Tom from outside of the jail so nobody could hurt him. Atticus most definitely did not need to do these things yet, he felt the need to. He most likely disagrees with the fact that all blacks should be treated unfairly and without any respect. Another great example of this would be when Atticus is standing up for Cal and is referring to her as is she was a member of their family. I truly think Atticus cares about black peoples’ rights and wants them to be treated with at least a little more respect. However, I don’t think he is so open about it because he doesn’t want to end up as a disgrace not only for his town, but for his own family (especially Jem and and Scout) too. He wants to do anything in his power to keep Jem and Scout from getting involved with his problems. Therefore, I think Atticus is a very generous man who wants all people to be treated with equality and with the same amount of respect.

      Reply
  3. Kate Ma.

    “so it took an eight-year-old to bring em to their senses, didn’t it?… That proves something- that a gang of wild animals can be stopped simply because they’re still human… You children made Walter Cunningham stand in my shoes for a minute. That was enough.”(210)

    This quote interested me because usually, people would be very angry after what had happened the night before, yet Atticus kept calm and still found the good in the situation. Instead of being mad and doing what Scout would’ve done; “First day Walter comes back to school’ll be the last”.(211) Atticus instead thinks of the situation as a learning experience for the mob and even himself. He realized that not everyone’s completely bad just because of one view of them. Mr. Cunningham in the mob is just one bad view of him, yet the last night, he was able to come to his senses and realize what he was doing wrong, which was a good thing. Atticus also forgives everyone. He forgave Mr. Cunningham; “I thought Mr. Cunningham was a friend of ours… He still is”(210). Even though Mr. Cunningham was about to do something awful, Atticus still thinks of him as their friend, and that goes to show how good natured Atticus truly is. Atticus always see’s the good in everything, even if it was as bad as the mob.

    Reply
    1. Emma Garbowitz

      I agree that you would think Atticus would feel at least a little bit angry at the men for what they did the night before. It was most definitely the wrong thing to do, however, I do think Atticus handled the situation well.

      Reply
    2. Laila Sayegh

      I agree that this quote shows Atticus’ good morals. Just like he did with Mrs. Dubose, he sees the good in people no matter what they do to him.

      Reply
  4. Emma Garbowitz

    “Yeah, but Atticus aims to defend him. That’s what I don’t like about it.”
    “This was news, news that put a different light on things: Atticus had to, whether he wanted to or not. I thought it odd that he hadn’t said anything to us about it— we could have used it many times in defending him and ourselves. He had to, that’s why he was doing it, equaled fewer fights and less fussing. But did that explain the town’s attitude? The court appointed Atticus to defend him. Atticus aimed to defend him.”

    I found this quote very interesting for many different reasons. This quote is saying that Atticus is defending Tom Robinson because its his obligation. It never says that Atticus volunteered or even wanted to pursue this case in the first place. He was forced to do it and knew he had to defend his client because it is his job. However, I don’t believe that this is the only reason why Atticus is actually trying to win this case. It obviously is his duty to be Tom’s lawyer and try to win the case but he didn’t have to do all the other things to help him as well. It might have been as small as a gesture of telling Scout not to say the word “nigger” or it could be as large as Atticus protecting Tom from outside of the jail so nobody could hurt him. Atticus most definitely did not need to do these things yet, he felt the need to. He most likely disagrees with the fact that all blacks should be treated unfairly and without any respect. Another great example of this would be when Atticus is standing up for Cal and is referring to her as is she was a member of their family. I truly think Atticus cares about black peoples’ rights and wants them to be treated with at least a little more respect. However, I don’t think he is so open about it because he doesn’t want to end up as a disgrace not only for his town, but for his own family (especially Jem and and Scout) too. He wants to do anything in his power to keep Jem and Scout from getting involved with his problems. Therefore, I think Atticus is a very generous man who wants all people to be treated with equality and with the same amount of respect.

    -I accidentally wrote my blog on a comment to another person’s post so here it is again…

    Reply
  5. Laila Sayegh

    “Atticus had to, whether he wanted to or not. I thought it odd that he hadn’t said anything to us about it — we could have used it many times in defending him and ourselves. He had to,
    that’s why he was doing it, equaled fewer fights and less fussing. But did that
    explain the town’s attitude? The court appointed Atticus to defend him. Atticus
    aimed to defend him. That’s what they didn’t like about it.”

    This quote intrigued me because it shows how the town of Maycomb is handling the fact that Atticus is defending Tom Robinson in a court case. Several times throughout the novel Atticus has been called some very rude names and accused of doing horrible things just because he is defending this man. Automatically, it proves the how “small-minded” the people of the town could be because just if someone looks different than them, they are merciless towards them. But in this case, specifically Atticus is being blamed when in reality, he was appointed by the court to take this case with Tom Robinson. Of course, as an attorney, he would put all of his effort into case, as he would with any other. Unfortunately, the citizens of Maycomb don’t see that. To them it is almost like Atticus is “going against them” when all he is doing is his job. I find it sad that the people aren’t looking at this case from a realistic perspective and making accusations that may very possibly be false.

    Reply
  6. jaclynl

    “Jem seemed to be having a quiet fit. He was pounding the balcony rail softly, and
    once he whispered, ‘We’ve got him.’
    I didn’t think so: Atticus was trying to show, it seemed to me, that Mr. Ewell
    could have beaten up Mayella. That much I could follow. If her right eye was
    blacked and she was beaten mostly on the right side of the face, it would tend to
    show that a left-handed person did it. Sherlock Holmes and Jem Finch would
    agree. But Tom Robinson could easily be left-handed, too. Like Mr. Heck Tate, I
    imagined a person facing me, went through a swift mental pantomime, and
    concluded that he might have held her with his right hand and pounded her with
    his left. I looked down at him. His back was to us, but I could see his broad
    shoulders and bull-thick neck. He could easily have done it. I thought Jem was
    counting his chickens.” (p. 238)

    With such a challenging case to take, it is finally the day of Tom Robinson’s trial. Although the witnesses and evidence that has been gathered can easily point to Tom Robinson being guilty, Atticus points out that Bob Ewell is left handed, and with bruises on the right side of the face, it would more likely for a left handed person to have done the damage. At this moment, Jem feels an overwhelming amount of relief relief. After all, it was not expected for Atticus to do so well during this trial since Tom Robinson is a black man. While Jem seems to be happy that things are going so well, Scout is able to recognize the reality of the situation. Although this trial is against Tom Robinson, a lot is being shown about the people of Maycomb as well. If the evidence of Bob Ewell being guilty lines up and he still wins the trial, it will again prove the racism throughout the town. There are still so many things to consider in this case and with the lack of evidence on both sides, odds are that justice will rule in favor of the Ewells, solely based on the color of their skin.

    Reply
  7. Hannah Pitkofsky

    “Yeah, but Atticus aims to defend him. That’s what I don’t like about it.”
    “This was news, news that put a different light on things: Atticus had to, whether he wanted to or not. I thought it odd that he hadn’t said anything to us about it— we could have used it many times in defending him and ourselves. He had to, that’s why he was doing it, equaled fewer fights and less fussing. But did that explain the town’s attitude? The court appointed Atticus to defend him. Atticus aimed to defend him.”

    This quote interested me because it showed how the town and the court reacted to Atticus’s choice to defend Tom Robinson at an earlier point in the novel. Everyone was confused about his choice, and some of them, when they attacked Tom, wanted to attack Atticus as well. Maycomb, being the racist town that it is, did not support Atticus’s decision, but Atticus stayed strong, even when everyone else was trying to change his mind.

    Reply
  8. Sunna

    “All the little man on the witness stand had that made him any better than his nearest neighbors was, that if scrubbed with lye soap in very hot water, his skin was white.”

    This paragraph was extremely important to the story. So far in this novel, we have seen Scout being quite indifferent about most of the events that take place in this story. However, Scout now notices just how racist the town is, and acknowledges it. She is starting to form her own opinions, that have been influenced by Atticus, and see the world a bit more clearly. Scout is maturing and becoming her own person, which truly fascinated me.

    Reply
  9. janem

    “There, we went up a covered staircase and waited at the door. Reverend Skyes came puffing behind us, and steered gently through the black people in the balcony. Four Negros rose and gave us their front-row seats.” (p. 219)

    Jem, Dill and Scout end up sitting in the colored section of the courthouse. This is symbolic for Jem, Dill and Scout’s lack of racism. Almost everyone in Maycomb county is extremely racist and cannot stand to have any sort of contact with black people. Despite this, Atticus has raised Jem and Scout to do what is morally right and to do your job in society. For Atticus, this means to be Tom Robinson’s lawyer, but for Scout, this means to ignore being teased for her father’s lack of racism. By Jem, Scout, and Dill to be segregated from the other people in the courthouse is for them being unlike them, and not discriminating on the colored people in Maycomb county.

    Reply
    1. Mikayla Friedman

      I agree with your analysis of Jem, Dill and Scout sitting in the colored section of the courtroom. I think Harper Lee might’ve included this detail (instead of just having the children sit in the white section) to show their innocence. Jem and Scout have been protected by their father and are therefore not totally aware of the town’s racism. Even if they know the town is racist, they certainly know this is not right, which is why they are unfazed by sitting in the colored section.

      Reply
  10. Casey

    “Mr. Gilmer asked him one more question. “About your writing with your left hand, are you ambidextrous, Mr. Ewell?”

    “I most positively am not, I can use one hand good as the other. One hand good as the other,” he added, glaring at the defense table.

    “Jem seemed to be having a quiet fit. He was pounding the balcony rail softly, and once he whispered, “We’ve got him.”

    In this chapter, Atticus is defending Tom Robinson in court. Scout, Jem, and Dill sneak along to see what happens. They see that Tom Robinson was accused raping Mayella Ewell. It’s very clear from that beginning that someone is lying, the witnesses continued to contradict themselves and hesitate between answers. Atticus asked many of the witnesses whether they were left or right handed. Since Mayella’s bruises were mostly on the right side of her body, it would make the most sense for a left handed person to have beat her up. This shows how Atticus is resilient and will do everything he can to defend Tom Robinson.

    Reply
    1. Zoe

      Although I didn’t really understand the court case entirely, you seemed to really understand and analyze it very well. Great paragraph!

      Reply
  11. Mikayla Friedman

    “It was a gala occasion. . . The courthouse square was covered with picnic parties sitting on newspapers, washing down biscuit and syrup with warm milk from fruit jars. Some people were gnawing on cold chicken and cold fried pork chops. The more affluent chased their food with drugstore Coca Cola . . .
    In a far corner of the square, the Negroes sat quietly in the sun, dining on sardines, crackers, and the more vivid flavors of Nehi Cola.” (p. 214)

    Although this passage is a small detail of the trial, it is important. These passages truly show the juxtaposition of how white people acted versus how African American people acted in this time. In this scene, people are getting ready for the big trial. Spectators rarely show up to town trials, but this case is crucial to the town’s reputation and history, and therefore it seems the whole town has shown up to watch it. Before the trial, people are eating and having picnics on the lawn. The white people are socializing and feasting on meats and fruits while they wait for the trial to begin. There are men and women and children, all excited for the upcoming event. In contrast, the African American people of the town are off to the side and they keep to themselves. Unlike the great amounts of food that the white people have, the black people have a somewhat reserved lunch, eating sardines and crackers and drinking flavored Coca Cola. I think Harper Lee uses this scene to juxtapose the lifestyles and habits of different ‘groups’ of people. The white people are loud and sociable, while the black people are more quiet and withdrawn. In a way, I think Lee is saying the white people are treating this trial almost like a party, because they are so confident they will win and Tom Robinson will be convicted of _____ (the system will not let me write the four letter word that begins with the letter r). On the other hand, the black people have little hope for Tom being seen as innocent, and are therefore more sullen and less celebratory.

    Reply
    1. MadiR

      I agree with your thoughts about Lee adding the scene you chose to contrast white people and African American people in the time period.

      Reply
  12. Zoe

    “Jem seemed to be having a quiet fit. He was pounding the balcony rail softly, and
    once he whispered, ‘We’ve got him.’
    I didn’t think so: Atticus was trying to show, it seemed to me, that Mr. Ewell
    could have beaten up Mayella. That much I could follow. If her right eye was
    blacked and she was beaten mostly on the right side of the face, it would tend to
    show that a left-handed person did it. Sherlock Holmes and Jem Finch would
    agree. But Tom Robinson could easily be left-handed, too. Like Mr. Heck Tate, I
    imagined a person facing me, went through a swift mental pantomime, and
    concluded that he might have held her with his right hand and pounded her with
    his left.

    After this important scene within the courtroom, Jem had strong feelings towards winning the case and believed that they had won as soon as they showed any form of evidence supporting their side. Although this could be true in a modern more accepting world, the jury was entirely white and all of most of the people there were completely against Tom from the beginning. Although in previous chapters he was shedding more of his childhood innocence and becoming more of an adult when he was refusing to leave Atticus when the men surrounded them, at this point he let his childhood beliefs take over and hope for a happy ever after for Tom and a fair trial when the judge and the whole jury is biased because of the race of the people involved in the case. Jem and his beliefs along with Scout show the real differences between adult society and opinions that change based on races and childhood opinions on how everyone is equal and deserves the same treatment no matter the color. This case is incredibly important and though all odds are against Tom Robinson, I hope he could somehow win the case.

    Reply
    1. stephaniec

      I agree that no matter what evidence Atticus gives to the jury, it might not ever be enough to persuade an all white jury to choose Tom, a colored man, over a white women.

      Reply
  13. Sophie

    “’But last night he wanted to hurt you.’
    Atticus placed his fork beside his knife and pushed his plate aside. ‘Mr.Cunningham’s basically a good man,’ he said, ‘he just has his blind spots along with the rest of us.'” (p. 210)

    This quote is only one out of the many times that Atticus has seen the good in people. This quote was significant to me because it showed me that even though Mr Cunningham was part of a mob that almost killed him, that hasn’t changed Atticus’ optimistic views at all. This made me stop and think, because I started to wonder what could happen during the trial. If Atticus could use his personality to his advantage, such as incorporating positivity and peace to argue and defend Tom as best as he can. I really hope that Atticus wins the trial, but even if he doesn’t, I still hope that his optimism and his good heart can help Tom in some way.

    Reply
  14. MadiR

    “Yeah, but Atticus aims to defend him. That’s what I don’t like about it.’
    This was news, news that put a different light on things: Atticus had to, whether he wanted to or not. I thought it odd that he hadn’t said anything to us about it—we could have used it many times in defending him and ourselves.”

    The significance in this quote is that Atticus did not have to try to win this case because it was appointed to him. Out of the good in his heart Atticus knew it was the right thing to try to win the case and he thought it was right to present it that way to his children and the town. After reading this passage I wanted to do a little more research on what was said about the case before hand. Mainly I reread when he was talking about how Scout and Jem might have a little trouble in school. I also looked into times when Atticus was talking about the case with family members and what I found was very intriguing. Atticus had said before in chapter 9 that he was appointed to the case by the Judge while speaking to his brother Jack. “Before I’m through, I intend to jar the jury a bit—I think we’ll have a reasonable chance on appeal, though. I really can’t tell at this stage, Jack. You know, I’d hoped to get through life without a case of this kind, but John Taylor pointed at me and said, ‘You’re It.’” This is hidden in plain sight Scout did not notice this so the reader did not think twice about this sentence. One of the main reasons Atticus did not tell Scout is because she could have defended Atticus and herself when kids at school picked on her and that is kind of the easy way out and not what Atticus believed in.

    Reply
  15. stephaniec

    “There, we went up a covered staircase and waited at the door. Reverend Skyes came puffing behind us, and steered gently through the black people in the balcony. Four Negros rose and gave us their front-row seats.” (p. 219)

    Since Jem, Scout, and Dill were late to the court, Reverend Skyes offered them a way in. He brought them to the section for people of color. Upon their arrival, four men gave up their seats to them, allowing them to sit in the front. From this seat they had a view of the whole court. In this court there were different sections based on the color of your skin. This scene was very symbolic in that Jem, Scout, and Dill were sitting in the colored section of the courthouse, while their father was defending a man of color.

    Reply
  16. angelicac1

    “All the little man on the witness stand had that made him any better than his nearest neighbors was, that if scrubbed with lye soap in very hot water, his skin was white.” (p.229)

    In this paragraph, Scout’s maturity kicks in and her perspective changes to see Bob Ewell for who and what he really is. Scout took note on what years of vagrancy, prejudice, and hate have to Bob. While he enjoys brief moments of attention by falsely accusing Tom Robinson, Scout learns that he nothing more than a pathetic “little man on the witness stand” who is only able to grab on the slightest bit of power just because he is white.

    Reply
    1. trinityt

      I agree with you. The point that Scout is able to realized this shows that she has matured over the years, and is able to understand more things than when she was younger. This also shows the racism in Maycomb because the only reason why Mr. Ewell was treated different instead of being treated like the bad person that he is because he’s white.

      Reply
  17. trinityt

    “All the little man on the witness stand had that made him any better than his nearest neighbors was, that if scrubbed with lye soap in very hot water, his skin was white.” (p.229).

    This passage interested me because it shows the racism in Maycomb, and Scout’s characterization as she’s growing up. In Maycomb, everyone knows that the Ewells were the worst of the town. However, Mr. Ewell is treated differently, instead of being treated like the bad person that he is, because he’s white. On the other hand, the blacks, which most were innocent, wasn’t treated fairly by the whites. Why? It’s because they were blacks. All of this unequality is because of different skins’ color. This shows the racism whites felt towards blacks. In addition, this shows that Scout is growing up, not only physically, but also as a person. When she realizes that this was racist, it shows that she is understanding and having her own opinion on the situation. Now, Scout is able to realize and understand some things she most likely wouldn’t when she was younger. This part shows not only the racism in Maycomb, but also Scout’s characterization as she’s growing up.

    Reply
  18. maxwellw

    In To Kill a Mockingbird the testimony and deliberations cover about five chapters with almost no digression. Though the trial targets Tom Robinson, in another sense it is Maycomb that is on trial, and while Atticus eventually loses the court case, he successfully reveals the injustice of a stratified society that confines blacks to the “colored balcony” and allows the word of a despicable, ignorant man like Bob Ewell to prevail without question over the word of a man who happens to be black.

    Reply
  19. Brishti Sarkar

    This was news, news that put a different light on things: Atticus had to, whether he wanted to or not. I thought it odd that he hadn’t said anything to us about it— we could have used it many times in defending him and ourselves. He had to, that’s why he was doing it, equaled fewer fights and less fussing. But did that explain the town’s attitude? The court appointed Atticus to defend him. Atticus aimed to defend him. That’s what they didn’t like about it. It was confusing. (p. 218).

    In this passage, we see how Scout sees the case in an entirely different view after finding out that Atticus was asked to take on the case. It is interesting that she talked about how many arguments she could have defended, because it seems like Atticus tried his best to help Tom Robinson regardless of the fact if he was asked to take on the case or not, and that is likely the reason that he did not tell Scout or Jem about it. This also leads to the fact that it showed how risky the court case is. The jury was made up of all white people, and they would favor the white girl over the black man. In the reading it stated that Tom Robinson was going to be tried for his life, so this accusation meant the difference between his life and death. If Atticus lost, then he would have to live with the guilt of knowing that he cost an innocent man his life. It also shows how people like Atticus had to help those like Tom Robinson. Black people in the early 1900s were not able to speak up for themselves and often had to rely on the few white people who would help them.

    Reply
  20. Hannah M.

    “All the little man on the witness stand had that made him any better than his nearest neighbors was, that if scrubbed with lye soap in very hot water, his skin was white.”

    In the chapters I read tonight this paragraph caught my eye. Scout is sometimes clueless about some events in the story. This paragraph shows how she is starting to notice the different characteristics of this town. She notices that her town is very racist and thinks about it for awhile. She is starting to be able to make her own decisions and think of something in a certain way and no one can influence her to think otherwise. Atticus helped Scout form these thoughts and opinions, but now Scout can see the world in a clearer way.

    Reply
  21. josepha4

    “All the little man on the witness stand that had made him any better than his neighbors was, if he was scrubbed with lye soap in very hot water, his skin was white.”

    This quote from chapter 16 we can finally see Scout having some of her own thoughts. Before as we discussed in class how Scout was just along for the ride and she was a pair of eyes to see the world through. Now she comprehends the Ewells behavior towards the trial. The only thing keeping them on the court stand is the fact that their skin is white and Tom Robinson’s skin is black. The trial would be completely irrational and radical to accuse a white man of such a thing. The case Aticcus attempts to make will be in vein because the Jury made up their minds even before they stepped into the courtroom. Also, we have evidence of Scout maturing which will make the novel much more interesting now that we don’t have just a narrating voice without perspective but a real person with their own point of view.

    Reply
  22. Maddie

    “‘Anything fit to say at the table’s fit to say in front of Calpurnia. She knows what she means to this family.'”

    In this quote, Atticus is telling Aunt Alexandra that Cal is a very important part of the family, and it is not okay to hide things from her. This is important because it goes against all of the talk in earlier chapters about Aunt Alexandra wanting to get rid of Cal. She had no right to say that, considering it is not even her house. Atticus proves his final point by saying this, and making it clear to Aunt Alexandra that getting rid of Cal would be like getting rid of a member of the family.

    Reply

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