September 28

“It’s me wot done it!”

Please respond to the great event of Chapter 39.  Some questions to consider:

  • How is this revelation the turning point of Pip’s life?
  • What is Pip’s reaction to this revelation in regard to himself? In regard to Estella?  In regard to Joe?
  • Predict what further changes may occur in Pip’s life and in his character as a result of this revelation.

As always, be sure to include many specific details in your response to support your opinions.  Also, be sure to respond to at least one other comment in this thread.

GE blog #13


Copyright © 2018. All rights reserved.

Posted September 28, 2018 by equinson in category Great Expectations

42 thoughts on ““It’s me wot done it!”

  1. Rcey Ortega

    In chapter 39, Pip gets a visitor. His convict visits Pip to tell him that Pip became a gentleman because of him. This was the turning point of Pip’s life because Pip realized that helping others out will give you something in return. I think that Pip is suprised, and grateful for what the convict did. “Again he took both my hands and put them to his lips, while my blood ran cold through me.” (Pg 320) The convict says that he can get any woman he wants with his money and if not, his looks. While the convict talked about this all he could think of was Estella. “They shall be yourn, dear boy, if money can buy them. Not that a gentleman like you, so we’ll set up as you, can’t win ‘me off of his own game; but money shall back you!” (Pg 321) Pip feels like he abandoned Joe now that he knows that the convict did it. “But, sharpest and deepest pain of all- it was for the convict, guilty of I knew not what crimes, and liable to be taken out of those rooms where I sat thinking, and hanged at the Old Bailey door, that I had deserted Joe.” (Pg 323) I think that Pip is going to start to treat the convict more like his father now. I also think that Pip is never going to visit Joe.

    Reply
    1. mirandak

      I totally agree with your interpretation of Pip’s thoughts about Joe. Now that he knows that this fortune came to be in his possession because of the convict, he feels as if he completely betrayed Joe and left him behind, and for nothing at all!

      Reply
  2. mirandak

    Over the course of Chapter 39, we see perhaps the greatest revelation in the entire book so far, and one that could very well change the route of the story as a whole. Essentially, the convict that Pip happened to encounter by chance all of those years ago as a mere little boy, also turned out to be the very founder of his fortunes! It is he, and he alone, who set Pip’s life on the path to higher society and to being a gentleman, and for what? Did he hope for anything in return? Absolutely not! Rather, he had bestowed this affluence upon Pip as his way of massively showing his gratuity to the boy for the deed he had done when he was little.
    Furthermore, I found this scene to be so incredibly significant in the entirety of “Great Expectations,” but even more, Pip’s life and development. This discovery of his true benefactor perhaps completely changed his outlook on his whole fortune in general. He had been so overjoyed when he was given this new wealth, because he had so long longed to change the factor of commonness that he had been associated with throughout his life. However, this happiness was most likely also in part as a result of who specifically had given him the money. Essentially, he had always suspected that it was of Miss Havisham’s doing, but once it was revealed to be the notorious convict, Pip was almost ashamed of his fortune. He didn’t want to be given money by someone like him! He wanted to have been given this fortune by someone of higher social standing, someone who was among this kind of affluence themselves- someone like Miss Havisham. For example, this way of thinking is represented when in the text it states, “‘Yes, Pip, dear boy, I’ve made a gentleman on you! It’s me wot has done it! I swore that time, sure as ever I earned a guinea, that guinea should go to you. I swore arterwards, sure as ever I spec’lated and got rich, you should get rich. I lived rough, that you should live smooth; I worked hard, that you should be above work. What odds, dear boy? Do I tell it, fur you to feel a obligation? Not a bit. I tell it, fur you to know as that there hunted dunghill dog wot you kep life in, got his head so high that he could make a gentleman – and, Pip, you’re him!’
    The abhorrence in which I held the man, the dread I had of him, the repugnance with which I shrank from him, could not have been exceeded if he had been some terrible beast.” (p.319-320) Perhaps, running through his mind, he could have been thinking along the lines of, “Why would I want money from someone whose hands might have been soiled with crime in the past? Sure, he might have changed his ways now, and although the gesture was out of his appreciation, I can’t enjoy this fortune now that I know it has come from the likes of him.” Perhaps, he may now no longer enjoy the benefits of his fortune now that he knows of its origins.
    In addition, the notion of being a gentleman only appealed to Pip in the first place for one sole reason: impressing Estella. Oh Estella! He was so deeply in love with her, and this entire time, he comforted his sorrows with the idea that she was allotted/meant to be with him! He could no longer hold this sense of comfort in his heart, as he now knew it all to be false. All that had been done by Miss Havisham and Estella, the major impact they had had on him, the anguish and shame that they had impressed upon him of his old life, it had all been for nothing. For instance, this is shown when in the text it states, “Miss Havisham’s intentions towards me, all a mere dream; Estella not designed for me; I only suffered in Satis House as a convenience, a sting for the greedy relations, a model with a mechanical heart to practise on when no other practice was at hand; those were the first smarts I had.” (p.323) Basically, ever since this wealth had come into his ownership, he had suspected that Miss Havisham was his benefactor. After all, she had introduced him to this sense of higher society in the first place, and Estella! However, he turned out to be merely a pawn in their game, Miss Havisham taking out her own heartbreak on Pip (and her hatred for all males in general) by using Estella, the torment and teasing that he had faced for his lifestyle, it was all worthless.
    Moreover, he felt such an overwhelming sense of guilt in regards to Joe (and Biddy) when he had found out that the convict had given him this fortune. This is because, Pip had left everything in his old life behind, his friends, the people that raised him, the surroundings that he grew up in- everything that had made him who he was as a person- and for what? He had thought it was for a life of extravagance and luxury; a life in which his problems would all drift away, and at last, he would get to be with his beloved Estella. But when he realized it in fact wasn’t, and it was at the hand of the convict, it had dawned on him that he had left his father figure, his best and closest friend, Joe, for nothing. For example, this is shown when in the text it states, “But, sharpest and deepest pain of all – it was for the convict, guilty of I knew not what crimes, and liable to be taken out of those rooms where I sat thinking, and hanged at the Old Bailey door, that I had deserted Joe. I would not have gone back to Joe now, I would not have gone back to Biddy now, for any consideration: simply, I suppose, because my sense of my own worthless conduct to them was greater than every consideration. No wisdom on earth could have given me the comfort that I should have derived from their simplicity and fidelity; but I could never, never, undo what I had done.” (p.323) Joe, who had always been there for Pip, supporting him in times of need, thinking highly of him and giving him advice when he had no one else to look to, was
    now all alone and full of sorrow, without a single companion to comfort him (he can only rely on Biddy to visit every once in a while, and even so, she plans on pursuing her career in the future and might not have much time to visit him). Basically, Pip proceeds to feel so incredibly horrible that he had left Joe for a fortune that possibly isn’t even to his liking anymore.
    Lastly, as a result of this massive reveal, I believe that Pip’s life could very much change quite a lot. Fundamentally,
    now that he is aware of who has bestowed this fortune upon him, I very much doubt that he will still particularly enjoy his fortune, and so, I think that he might try to ditch this new life and head back home! He is no longer proud of how he came to be in this position of wealth, and now that he knows that it isn’t of Miss Havisham’s doing (so she couldn’t necessarily be upset if he decides to come back home; if she isn’t his benefactor, why would she get to have a say in how Pip decides to run his life with his money?), there is nothing stopping him from returning home and mending his relationship with Joe.
    All in all, this chapter in the novel has proven to be of the utmost significance to the entire story, and will probably play a humongous role in how the story will change, and Pip’s character along with it! When I had read this chapter, I couldn’t bear to put the book down, and I wanted to continue to read, as I can’t wait to find out how Dickens developed the novel after this large revelation!

    Reply
    1. trinityt

      I agree with what you said. I feel like we will be seeing more of father-to-son and best-friend-to-best-friend moments between Pip and Joe.

      Reply
  3. trinityt

    In chapter 39, we encounter probably the greatest revelation in this book! This revelation can even change the course of the story. It can also change Pip as well!

    In this chapter, Pip got a visitor. It was the convict! The convict that Pip has met all those years ago back at the marshes, but that’s not all. “‘Yes, Pip, dear boy, I’ve made a gentleman on you! It’s me wot has done it! I swore that time, sure as ever I earned a guinea, that guinea should go to you. I swore arterwards, sure as ever I spec’lated and got rich, you should get rich. I lived rough, that you should live smooth; I worked hard, that you should be above work. What odds, dear boy? Do I tell it, fur you to feel a obligation? Not a bit. I tell it, fur you to know as that there hunted dunghill dog wot you kep life in, got his head so high that he could make a gentleman- and, Pip, you’re him!'” (pg.319). Pip discovered that the convict was the one that gave him the chance to be a gentleman. Not anyone else, but the convict. Did the convict ask anything in return? Nope! Not at all! The reason that the convict made Pip into a gentleman was to thank him for what he did when he was younger. However, after that, Pip doesn’t have the best feelings in the world for the convict. “He laid his hand on my shoulder. I shuddered at the thought that for anything I knew, his hand might be stained with blood.” (pg.322). Pip, like the very first time that he met the convict at the marshes, was afraid of the convict. He was afraid of the crimes that the convict may have committed. Therefore, Pip doesn’t feel good having the convict as the origin of his fortune.
    In addition, it’s true that Estella was the main reason that Pip wanted to become a gentleman. He doesn’t want to be “common” so that he could impressed her. Throughout the story, Pip thought that maybe it was Miss Havisham who gave him the opportunity of becoming a gentleman so that he could be with Estella. So that he was good enough for her. However, he was wrong. “Miss Havisham’s intentions towards me, all a mere dream; Estella not designed for me; I only suffered in Satis House as a convenience, a sting for the greedy relations, a model with a mechanical heart to practice on when no other practice was at hand; those were the first smarts I had.” (pg.323). Pip realized that he was nothing, but just a pawn to Miss Havisham. He was just there so that Miss Havisham and Estella could look down upon him, and tease him and torment him with their words and actions. Now that Pip realized that the convict was the one that made him a gentleman, not someone from a higher class like Miss Havisham, he probably won’t enjoy his fortune as much as he used to. “But, sharpest and deepest pain of all- it was for the convict, guilty of I knew not what crimes, and liable to be taken out of those rooms where I sat thinking, and hanged at the Old Bailey door, that I had deserted Joe.” (pg.323). Pip felt guilty that he left all his friends, his family, and his father figure and best friend, Joe, behind to achieve what he though to be a grand, luxury, and problem-free life, which turns out to be quite problematic.

    Overall, this chapter has proven to be the most significance in the story so far. It clearly has an impact on Pip, and will definitely change his character and change the story as well. Before this chapter, I predict that the convict will show up again, but never in this way. I was quite shocked when the convict made his big reveal. What a big revelation this was! I’m very excited to see what will happen next in this book.

    Reply
    1. angelicac1

      Chapter 39 is totally one of the most significant parts of “Great Expectations” and all the events that happened in this chapter will absolutely change the story and Pip’s character.

      Reply
  4. Sunna

    I’m chapter 39, Pip find out that the convict was the one who made him a gentleman. This is a turning point in Pip’s life because it shows him that even if you did something for someone in the past, it can still affect you in the future. He may have not thought about what he did for the convict in a while, but the convict worked for years to give Pip a better life-in certain ways. On page 319, it states, “‘Yes, Pip, dear boy, I’ve made a gentleman on you! It’s me wot has done it! I swore that time, sure as ever I earned a guinea, that guinea should go to you. I swore arterwards, sure as ever I spec’lated and got rich, you should get rich. I lived rough, that you should live smooth; I worked hard, that you should be above work. What odds, dear boy? Do I tell it, fur you to feel a obligation? Not a bit. I tell it, fur you to know as that there hunted dunghill dog wot you kep life in, got his head so high that he could make a gentleman- and, Pip, you’re him!’” The fact that the convict never forgot what Pip did for him fascinated me, and was one of the most interesting storylines of the book so far. However, Pip has always felt afraid of the convict and what he has done, so this doesn’t make him feel very good when he finds out that the convict was the cause of him becoming a gentleman. He feels ashamed, and wishes that he had been given the money from someone like Miss Havisham, who he had originally thought had made him a gentleman. He wishes that it had been from someone of a higher class, instead of being more grateful to the convict. But I can’t blame him entirely. The convict has obviously done some horrible things in his life, and I would feel uncomfortable, too. As for Estella, when he finds out about what the convict did, he can only think about her. He wanted to become a gentleman for her. And Miss Havisham? He realizes that he didn’t mean as much to her as he thought he did, now that he knows that she didn’t make him a gentleman. He feels used and his fortune suddenly doesn’t seem so great. In addition, Pip also thinks about Joe and Biddy. Now that he knows how he came to acquire his fortune, he feels as though he abandoned them. On page 323, it says, “But, sharpest and deepest pain of all – it was for the convict, guilty of I knew not what crimes, and liable to be taken out of those rooms where I sat thinking, and hanged at the Old Bailey door, that I had deserted Joe. I would not have gone back to Joe now, I would not have gone back to Biddy now, for any consideration; simply, I suppose, because my sense of my own worthless conduct to them was greater than every consideration. No wisdom on earth could have given me the comfort that I should have derived from their simplicity and fidelity; but I could never, never, undo what I had done.” I would sympathize with Pip, but why is he only now realizing how badly he treated his family? Is it because he suddenly feels ashamed of where his fortunes came from? What class the person that gave it to him was from? Would he feel the same remorse if his fortunes had come from Miss Havisham? I think that Pip will start to come back to his senses and even miss his old life more. Maybe he won’t go back to it, but he definitely will not feel as proud of his fortunes as he did before. All in all, this chapter was a huge change for Pip, and it will completely change the course of this book.

    Reply
  5. Emma Garbowitz

    Throughout chapter 39, an astonishing event occurred that would change Pip’s life forever. The convict who Pip has been scared of, was the true provider of his fortune. Pip never would have thought in a million years that the convict would do this great deed. However, now that he knows the fortune was from the convict, Pip is no longer as excited as he was before. Pip expected the great sum of money to be from a higher social class, such as Miss Havisham’s doing, but he was wrong. Why would the convict of all people do this great deed for Pip? Was is just because of the mere act Pip did when he was just a young boy? The convict must be doing this for something more than just from Pip giving him food, but what could it be?
    Now that Pip knows who the benefactor of his fortune is, this changed his whole outlook of his fortune. At first, when Pip obtained this great sum of money, he was overly excited and was extremely happy that his dreams will come true. He assumed that this was possibly Miss Havisham’s doing as a way to repay him for coming over. But, once he realized that this was the convict’s money, Pip felt mostly ashamed and disappointed from it. Pip most surely, did not want the money from the someone who used to be a convict, he wanted it from someone with class, and someone who is most surely a gentleman (or woman). This just makes Pip feel terribly about everything that had to do with the money. The text states,” But wot, if I gets liberty and money, I’ll make that boy a gentleman!’ And I done it. Why, look at you dear boy! Look at these lodgings o’ yourn, fit for a lord! A lord? Ah! You shall show more with lords for wagers, and beat ’em!” This shows how the convict did all of this just for Pip, so he could have the fortune.
    As well as this, gaining this fortune had a huge effect on how Pip thought of Miss Havisham and Estella. Pip knew that he and Estella belonged together and that was all that kept him going about his love for her. However, now that Pip found out that the fortune was from the convict and not Miss Havisham, Pip now knows they are most definitely not meant to be. Going to the Satin House was merely an inconvenience and meant nothing. The reality is setting into place for Pip and he is learning so many things that he should have realized before. The text states, ” Miss Havisham’s intentions towards me, all a mere dream; Estella not designed for me ; I only suffered the Satis in House as a convenience, a sting for the greedy relations, a model with a mechanical heart to practise on when no other practice was at hand; those were the first smarts I had.” This shows how Pip is realizing that whoever gave him this fortune affects his thoughts a great deal. It also changed the way Pip thought of himself, other things, and other people.
    Pip’s revelation also had a huge effect in regard to Joe. Pip is feeling guilty about leaving his whole life behind to pursue becoming a gentleman, with his newfound fortune. However, now that he knows the convict was behind all of this, Pip realized that he would have been content and happy if the convict didn’t set this all up. The text states, “O, that he had never come! That he had left me at the forge – far from contented, yet, by comparison, happy.” This shows Pip would have been so much happier if he was just left at the forge with Joe, Biddy, and Mrs. Joe(when she was alive).Therefore, this shows if Pip never obtained his fortune, he could have happy and it would’ve saved him so much hardship in his life.
    In conclusion, now that Pip know the truth about who gave him his fortune, his whole perspective changed about it. He now thinks the Satis House and all the events that occurred there are pointless, and that he feels guilty about leaving everyone behind in his old, little town. Pip is now realizing that reality is setting into place and his life is about to change… maybe for the better, or maybe for the worse?

    Reply
  6. Myles Ng

    In this chapter Pip finds out that the person who gave him his fortune was none other than his convict. I believe this is a great turning point in Pip’s life. All the time he was a gentleman he thought that the money was from Ms. Havisham and not from anyone else. I think he believed Ms. Havisham wanted him to be a gentleman and be with Estella. This provided him with a drive and will. Now that he knows that it wasn’t them I think Pip will have a huge change of perspective on things. I thought Pip would be very grateful for the convict after hearing all that he did for him. Instead he was horrified and disgusted. He thought that this fortune was his destiny, becoming a gentleman was the thing he was meant to do. He left his family, his friends behind to pursue his dreams. Pip has always believed he and Estella were meant to be. Now that he knows the true origins of his money he does not believe that him and Estella will be together. He also sees the way he treated Joe and Ms. Joe was wrong. I believe this event will have a profound effect on Pip. I think he will go out to fix the error of his ways. He will amend his friendship with Joe and try to make things right. i think that Pip finding out the true origin of his money will be a turn for the better.

    Reply
  7. janem

    In chapter 39 of “Great Expectations” by Charles Dickens, the mystery of Pip’s benefactor has been revealed. To Pip’s and the readers’ astonishment, the convict Pip helped out so many years ago is the one that made him a gentleman. Pip is utterly disgusted. This ties into the reoccurring theme of guilt and shame in the novel. Although it was so long ago, Pip still feels guilty for helping out the convict. He is consoled by reminding himself that what he did is very far in the past and doesn’t matter anymore, so he can continue to live his life guilt-free. But the convict returning and reminding him of what the convict sees as a noble deed makes Pip feel guilty and ashamed. Pip also feels that knowing his benefactor has tainted his luxuries, and can only be seen as a gift for doing wrong. Lastly, Pip feels ashamed for thinking his benefactor to be Miss Havisham. He assumed she made him a gentleman so he could be good enough for Estella. Pip, now thinking himself so foolish, regrets the way he acted towards Joe. He was so negative towards Joe for being a blacksmith, awkward, and common because he wanted to be liked by Estella, since he thought becoming a gentleman was for her all along. Now his motives have changed since his question of “Who is making me a gentleman?” has been answered, and is going to change himself so he feels less guilt and shame.

    Reply
    1. Brishti Sarkar

      I love how you connected it to the overlapping theme of guilt and shame. I think it really shows how Pip’s life gets worse every time he feels this way, and that he should have been careful what he wishes for.

      Reply
  8. Brishti Sarkar

    In chapter 39, it is revealed who the true benefactor of Pip’s great expectations are. Up until this point, Pip thought that it was Miss Havisham, and that she wanted to set Pip and Estella up so they would end up together. This was not the case when we find out that it was actually the convict that Pip had fed in the churchyard when he was a little boy. This is a great turning point in his life when the unbelievable reality hits him and his whole world is shattered. All this time, he remained hopeful that Miss Havisham was setting him up with Estella, and was convinced that he was to marry her. He didn’t care about Joe and Biddy, because he thought he was leaving them for a brighter future with Estella in the name of love. He now knows that him and Estella were never meant to be together. And furthermore, Pip feels extremely bad for abandoning Joe in the hopes to pursue a false dream. He said that the “sharpest and deepest pain of all” was the he had deserted Joe (p.323). I think that in the future, Pip will come to terms with this revelation, but for now, he is going to despise his convict. I also think that this has been truly the “end” of Pip’s child life because although he has been an adult for some while in regards to his age, he has been dreaming an impossible dream and now he knows the harsh reality of life, that things don’t always work out in his favor.

    Reply
    1. mikaylaf

      I agree with what you said about this being the end of Pip’s childhood. This revelation was an eye opener for Pip, and now he has to live in reality.

      Reply
  9. angelicac1

    In Chapter 39 of “Great Expectations” by Charles Dickens, an important disclosure is revealed to Pip as well to readers. Primarily, Pip discovers that the convict that he encountered as a little boy, is Pip’s benefactor. The convict was the individual who provided Pip the path to being a gentleman. He fulfilled this task to exhibit his gratitude towards Pip because of the deed Pip had done when he was younger.
    The exploration of who his benefactor was is something that is especially essential to Pip’s evolvement as a character and to the whole story. When Pip was sent to London to become a gentleman, he was euphoric over the wealth he was given. His wealth changed Pip’s personality and his perspective on life. Pip’s idea was that Miss Havisham was his benefactor, but once it was revealed that the convict was his benefactor, Pip became ashamed of his wealth. His desire wasn’t to have someone like his convict being his benefactor. He wanted it to be an individual with a high social class. For instance, on page 319 and 320, the text states, “Yes, Pip, dear boy, I’ve made a gentleman on you! It’s me wot has done it! I swore that time, sure as ever I earned a guinea, that guinea should go to you. I swore arterwards, sure as ever I spec’lated and got rich, you should get rich. I lived rough, that you should live smooth; I worked hard, that you should be above work. What odds, dear boy? Do I tell it, fur you to feel a obligation? Not a bit. I tell it, fur you to know as that there hunted dunghill dog wot you kep life in, got his head so high that he could make a gentleman – and, Pip, you’re him!’
    The abhorrence in which I held the man, the dread I had of him, the repugnance with which I shrank from him, could not have been exceeded if he had been some terrible beast.” (p.319-320) Perhaps, running through his mind, he could have been thinking along the lines of, “Why would I want money from someone whose hands might have been soiled with crime in the past? Sure, he might have changed his ways now, and although the gesture was out of his appreciation, I can’t enjoy this fortune now that I know it has come from the likes of him.”
    Furthermore, the thought of Estella belonging with Pip, disappeared. The main reason Pip wished for being a gentleman was because of Estella. His desire was to be with her and his answer of making this happen, was to become a gentleman. He now thought that being a gentleman was only a waste of time because he was now aware of Miss Havisham’s true intentions of wanting Pip to fall in love with Estella so she could break his heart. This is shown on page 323 when in the text it states, “Miss Havisham’s intentions towards me, all a mere dream; Estella not designed for me; I only suffered in Satis House as a convenience, a sting for the greedy relations, a model with a mechanical heart to practise on when no other practice was at hand; those were the first smarts I had.”
    But, sharpest and deepest pain of all – it was for the convict, guilty of I knew not what crimes, and liable to be taken out of those rooms where I sat thinking, and hanged at the Old Bailey door, that I had deserted Joe. I would not have gone back to Joe now, I would not have gone back to Biddy now, for any consideration: simply, I suppose, because my sense of my own worthless conduct to them was greater than every consideration. No wisdom on earth could have given me the comfort that I should have derived from their simplicity and fidelity; but I could never, never, undo what I had done.”
    I believe that because Pip knows the truth on his true benefactor, his entire perspective will change on the life he now has. He’ll believe that meeting Miss Havisham and Estella and becoming a gentleman, were all purposeless events that happened in his life because they led him away from his old life that he was content with.

    Reply
  10. Hannah Pitkofsky

    In chapter 39 of Great Expectations, Pip receives a visit from an unknown stranger, who he later realizes was his convict from when he was a little boy. His convict explains to Pip what was going on in his life and how he knew about Pip being a gentleman and that he’s “so proud of the gentleman he’s become”. Pip, as anyone in that position, was confused about how his convict found him, and also how he knew Pip’s new social class. The convict explains that Mr. Wemmick gave him Pip’s address, and also that he was one of the people behind-the-scenes this whole time! He had spoken to Mr. Jaggers beforehand and asked him if he would give Pip an apprenticeship and also give him the money that he had previously sent to him. Mr. Jaggers agreed, and that was how Pip became a gentleman: his convict. This shocked me because I didn’t realize that he got out of prison, or that he somehow figured out a way to get Pip to be a gentleman! In my opinion, the best part about this affair is that his convict didn’t get anything in return and that he was just returning the favor that he owed to Pip for letting him go all those years ago.

    Reply
  11. stephaniec

    For the duration of chapter 39, what appeared to be the most significant revelation the novel has seen so far had occured. At the start of chapter of 39, the astonishing and true identity of Pip’s mysterious benefactor was revealed. The unknown man said “‘Yes, Pip, dear boy, I’ve made a gentleman on you! It’s me wot has done it!’”(page 319). Pip soon realized the nameless man was no other than convict himself, meaning that Pip’s unknown benefactor was indeed the convict! Pip first encountered the convict, in a state of starvation at the churchyard back home when he was a young boy. Pip served a small act of kindness to the convict out of fear of what might happen to him if he disobeyed the convict’s wishes. Little did Pip know, delivering food and materials to this man, would lead him to live a life in London trying to pursue his dreams of winning over his one true love Estella, by becoming a gentleman. The convict was so touched by Pip, that he chose to show his gratitude by pushing Pip in the direction he needed to reach his goals. However, as this seemed so wonderful and special to the readers, Pip was not so fond of the new information he had received. Pip was completely humiliated that his mighty benefactor was someone who was as common as he used to be and evidently a criminal.
    Furthermore, finding out his benefactor was the convict meant that Miss. Havisham, the person Pip hoped it was, was not. Essentially, this meant that although she initially introduced Pip to the upper class life, the time Pip spent with Ms. Havisham was a waste of time. In addition, assuming that Ms. Havisham was his benefactor, supplied Pip with the hope that him and Estella were meant to be with each other. Knowing that she is not, made Pip uncertain of all he thought was true and formed a lot of questions with not a lot of answers. For example, Pip thought to himself “Miss Havisham’s intentions towards me, all a mere dream; Estella not designed for me; I only suffered in Satis House as a convenience, a sting for greedy relations, a model with mechanical heart to practice was at hand; those were the first smarts I had.” (page 323).
    Finally, the revelation affected the way Pip felt for Biddy, and most importantly Joe. Pip was awfully ashamed of his doings towards Joe, but was too ashamed to even be in the same room with him and Biddy ever again for the fear of what they will now think of him. After all Pip had done to them, he knew he could not mend of fix his wrongdoings in anyway possible, but that did not stop him for feeling the way he felt about it. Pip thought to himself “I would not have gone back to Joe now, I would not have gone back to Biddy now, for any consideration; simply, I suppose, because my sense of my own worthless conduct to them was greater than every consideration.” (page 323).
    Overall, I think the great revelation of Pip’s benefactor will cause Pip’s character to develop and will leave Pip with a tremendous amount of questions that need answering. For example, Pip might think “Is there a real future for Estella and me?” or “Should I go back home?”. On page 323, I think Dickens’ portrays Pip’s emotions perfectly when the page read “Miss Havisham’s intentions towards me, all a mere dream; Estella not designed for me; I only suffered in Satis House as a convenience, a sting for greedy relations, a model with mechanical heart to practice was at hand; those were the first smarts I had. But, sharpest and deepest pain of all – it was for the convict, guilty of I knew not what crimes, and liable to be taken out of those rooms where I sat thinking, and hanged at the Old Bailey door, that I deserted Joe”.

    Reply
  12. mikaylaf

    I believe that chapter 39 of Great Expectations is the climax of the novel, and of Pip’s life. In this chapter, there is a huge plot twist that I never expected. It turns out that Pip’s convict, the man he helped so many years ago, is Pip’s benefactor! It is because of the convict that Pip became a gentleman. Dickens wrote this chapter beautifully. It was so suspenseful and exciting and heartfelt. This revelation is definitely the turning point of Pip’s life. For the past few years, especially since he has come of age, Pip has questioned Jaggers has to who his benefactor is. Jaggers always refuses to tell Pip, and this leaves Pip feeling confused. Finally, Pip knows who has supported him with all the money he’s needed to become a gentleman! Personally, I was as surprised as Pip was (if not more) to learn about the convict’s life after he met Pip. I find it hard to believe that after being a criminal, the convict was able to make enough money to support himself and sponsor Pip. I was also shocked to learn that the convict gave almost all of his money to Pip. You would think that a criminal would be greedy and selfish. But not Pip’s convict! Pip’s convict felt he owed a debt to Pip, and therefore put his life’s savings into making him a gentleman. It is almost as if Pip and the convict have defied what they’re ‘supposed’ to act like. What I mean by this is that, generally speaking, gentlemans are nice and generous people, like Herbert. However, Pip does not fit those categories. He is never satisfied with what he has, and he always wants more. On the other hand, people usually think of criminals as devious and mean. Pip’s convict is the complete opposite. He is considerate and kind, and these traits show in the fact of how much money he invested in Pip.

    I get the impression that Pip thinks less of his fortune now. He thought the money came from someone of a high social class, like Miss Havisham. Now that he knows that the convict provided him with everything, Pip thinks it is false. Pip is also a little afraid of the convict. The text states, “He laid his hand on my shoulder. I shuddered at the thought that for anything I knew, his hand might be stained with blood.” Pip isn’t sure of what the convict is capable of. In addition, Pip is devastated by the fact that since the money didn’t come from Miss Havisham, he isn’t betrothed to Estella. Pip writes, “Miss Havisham’s intentions toward me, all a mere dream; Estella not designed for me; I only suffered in Satis House as a convenience…” (page 323) Although the convict tells Pip he can get girls with his money and certainly his good look, Pip is not so sure. In regard to Joe (and Biddy), this revelation opens Pip’s eyes. He sees that he should’ve never left his family for money and deserted them. However, he is too ashamed of his actions to ever go back to them. Pip says, “I would not have gone back to Joe now, I would not have gone back to Biddy now, for any consideration; simply, I suppose, because my sense of my own worthless conduct to them was greater than every consideration. No wisdom on Earth could have given me the comfort that I should have derived from their simplicity and fidelity; but I could never, never, never, undo what I had done.” (page 323) This last sentence is very important. Pip recognizes his bad deeds, and he knows that as much as he could try to apologize and make things up to Joe and Biddy, it would never be the same.

    As a result of this revelation, further changes may occur in Pip’s life and character. I predict that he will soon visit Joe and Biddy and explain everything to them. I don’t think they will ever truly forgive him, but knowing their characters they will do their best. Furthermore, I don’t think Pip will want to be a gentleman anymore. In this chapter, Pip thinks of what would’ve happened if he never met Jaggers and moved to London. “O, that he had never come! That he had left me at the forge – far from contented, yet, by comparison, happy!” (page 321) I predict Pip will move back home and work at the forge with Joe and live peacefully and happily.

    Reply
    1. Kate Ma.

      I agree that it will be hard for Joe and Biddy to forgive Pip after all that he has done to him. I think that Joe will teach Pip another lesson about life he does visit them and apologize.

      Reply
  13. Kate Ma.

    Chapter 39 is a huge turning point in Great Expectations. Pip’s benefactor has come back into his life. The convict, from when Pip was a young boy has returned to the plot and came back as a major character, Pip’s benefactor. At first Pip was scared of him, remembering him as the same person he was many years ago. But now Pip’s convict has changed for the better. The convict has worked very hard for Pip remembering how he fed him when he was starving in the marshes. Now that Pip realizes who has been supporting him, he understands that Joe, the convict, Biddy, and Mrs. Joe has helped him the most and he has never been thankful or repayed them for their gracefulness. Instead Pip treats Estella, Miss. Havisham and all his London friends with great respect and thankfulness. For instance, Pip says, “I would not have gone back to Joe now, I would not have gone back to Biddy now, for any consideration; simply, I suppose, because my sense of my own worthless conduct to them was greater than any consideration.”(323) This shows how Pip knows that he has done wrong by thinking and treating badly because he was common, meanwhile his new father was a criminal and works on a farm. I think that Pip now comes to a consideration that social classes don’t matter, what matters is how people treat other people. Estella and Miss. Havisham has done nothing for Pip except talk down upon him. Joe and all of his home friends has done everything they can for Pip just so that he can have a half decent life as a common boy. It’s hard to tell what Pip will do with this new outlook; will he stay in London and be a gentleman? Or will he go back home and confess his feelings to his family? Pip is extremely ashamed of himself for what he’s done to his own family just because they didn’t reach the upper class. Pip came to a huge consideration in chapter 39 that might change his life if he decides to do the right thing.

    Reply
  14. jaclynl

    In chapter 39, there is a big revelation in the story that could be the turning point of the whole novel. The convict from the very first chapter reappears and as it turns out, he is Pip’s benefactor. This was a huge surprise to me because I had almost forgotten about this first scene and now, this convict is the reason for this entire story. Although this was really interesting to finally find out as the reader, for Pip, this news isn’t as great.

    For the longest time, Pip has believed that Miss Havisham was the one who gave him this great fortune ultimately for him and Estella to end up together in the end. Pip truly thought that this is what happened and that Estella is his destiny. Finding out that Miss Havisham was not the benefactor meant that everything Pip has done over all of these years, all of the people he’s left in order to become a gentleman and everything he’s thought would happen was wrong. This means that Pip left his lifetime best friend, Joe, for no reason. Pip has abandoned his old life with the amazing people that used to surround him but ended up making a huge mistake.

    Now that Pip knows that it was not Miss Havisham who was his benefactor, I think that he may slowly give up Estella. One of the things that made him hold on for so long was the thought that they were destined to be together. Now that Pip knows that is not the case, he may be able to give it up. Maybe now, Pip will even befriend the convict. The fact that someone took so much time to help a stranger after just one good thing that they have done for you is unbelievable. Even though Pip is disappointed on who his benefactor was, that does not mean that he will not be grateful. Pip may even revisit Joe and Biddy to try and make things right. I’m not sure on how they will react to this, considering it has been so long, but I do think that they will be grateful for his gesture to reconnect anyway and may even be able to forgive him with time. I do hope that after all of this, Pip will make a realization and change the way he acts. Hopefully, from now on, he will stick with the people he cares about no matter who they are.

    Reply
  15. maxwellw

    When Pip meets his convict from many years ago it’s major revelation for him because of its relevance to Miss Havisham and Estella. Pip learns that all his suffering was just “practice” for Estella. Also now that Pip knows the true identity of his doner, he realizes that he “only suffered in Satis Hous as a convenience,” for the convict. Though all of this is bad enough, the worst pain Pip felt in this chapter was for Joe. All of this time Pip had lived believing that he was meant for Estella and that being raised under a blacksmith was too “common”, but now that he knows the truth he feels as if he’s greatly neglected Joe. Even worse so the neglect was for no reason. Maybe this will be the catalyst that causes Pip to really rectify his treatment of those he knew since he was a child.

    Reply
  16. MadiR

    In chapter 39 Charles Dickens gives the reader some questions to consider. In this chapter Pip had a surprising visitor. The person he had been waiting for, the benefactor, arrived at his house during a stormy night to reveal his identity. Pip is shocked to discover that the benefactor is his convict from years ago! Also, that his benefactor is not Ms. Havisham. This revelation that the convict is his benefactor is a turning point in Pip’s life. Pip now begins to question his relationship with Estella. “Ms. Havisham’s intensions towards me, all a mere dream; Estella not designed for me; I only suffered in Satis House as a convenience, a sting for the greedy relations, a model with a mechanical heart to practice on when no other practice was at hand; those were the first smarts I had.” (page 323) I think Pip is going to act very differently now that his benefactor has been revealed. I think Pip is going to confide in Herbert. Pip may now agree with Herbert that he should try to forget Estella as she has not been designated for him. I also think Pip should try to mend his relationship with Joe.

    Reply
  17. Maddie

    In chapter 39 there is a huge turning point in the story and quite an unexpected twist. As Pip is sitting by the fire reading, a man comes into the house. This man is strange, and at first Pip does not recognize him. Then, as Pip begins to see his face clearer, Pip realizes that the man is his old convict! Not only is Pip being visited by his convict from his childhood, he also finds out that he is being visited by the man who made him a gentleman! His benefactor has finally revealed himself. Pips reaction to this is shocked. All along, he was almost sure that his benefactress was Miss Havisham, and he is now very overwhelmed. Pip realizes that this means he was not set up for Estella, and that they have no future together. This makes him upset, instead of the expected reaction, which would be surprised and happy. He believes that his chances with Estella are close to ruined. I think he should be extremely grateful to his convict, because if it weren’t for him, Pip would not be living a rich, upscale life in London. “Miss Havisham’s intentions towards me, all a mere dream; Estella not designed for me…” I think Pip will not give up on his hopes of being with Estella, though, because it is so hard for him to resist her, no matter how hard he tries. I am intrigued in this new revelation, and can’t wait for part three!

    Reply
    1. josepha4

      I think it’s interesting that Pip would rather have a benefactor who is an evil lady than a man who really cares about Pip’s well being.

      Reply
  18. josepha4

    Chapter 39 answers the question every reader, and Pip, has been wondering about his life. We see that the benefactor that gave Pip the opportunity to become a gentleman was not Ms. Havisham, but rather the convict whom he saved in the first chapter. This is a turning point in Pip’s life because he always fantasized about the kind of gentleman or woman who “made him” and sustained him. However, it turns out that this “gentleman” was actually the at the bottom of the social status as a a convict. And he is not a man of leisure, but rather worked for his money. This revelation flashes back Pip’s memory, how could he be so rude to the people who raised him and taught him important life lessons. I personally think this is the best thing for Pip, he needed to be reminded of his roots and how he can fix things even if he feels ashamed. For example, “I would not have gone back to Joe now, I would not have gone back to Biddy now, for any consideration;simply I suppose because my sense of my own worthless conduct to them was greater than any consideration.” This shows that now that he knows he doesn’t owe anything to Mrs. Havisham and Estella because they aren’t him benefactors it gets him thinking for the first time in a long time about something other than his own well being. The convict surprising Pip may have been the best thing that has happened to him a long time. In the future, I expect that Pip will visit his old family and beg for his forgiveness. Also, in the previous chapters, when Pip made an empty promise to Biddy to visit Joe more often I think he will come through on his promise. I’m very glad to see that something may knock some sense into Pip and I hope to see some growth in the next chapters.

    Reply
  19. Sophie

    Chapter 39 of Great Expectations consists of the novels biggest turning point so far. Pip finds out that the mysterious person who has gifted him with his good wealth and fortune was his convict! Of anybody in the entire novel, I would have NOT guessed that it was him. This event is definitely going to change Pip’s life. The biggest conclusion of all of this, is that this is what Pip needed. What I mean by that is basically, throughout the entire story so far we have recognized Pip’s weaknesses and made observations of his mistakes that he’s made. By concluding his mistakes we then could make predictions of the lessons he could learn. After hearing this life altering news, Pip is only at the start of hard lessons he is going to learn.
    One of the “lessons” that has came up a lot in earlier chapters was Pips desire for superiority over what really matters most, his family relationships. As we know now, that thanks to the convict his dreams became a reality, his desires took over his entire life. He loved his new fancy London life, and didn’t care very much about his life long relatives back at home. However, now that he has come to the realization that his wealth came from someone of a much lower class than him, not a high powerful upper class, he is starting to feel a slight show of guilt. Maybe he isn’t as special as he thought he was. Maybe all that ego that kept him from having a relationship with the two most important people of his life, really wasn’t all that rellevant. Pip feels terrible that he treated Joe and Biddy with such disrespect after all that they have done for him. I predict that Pip is going to think he learned his lesson by apologizing to them. But I don’t think he will officially “learn” anything it until he sees that a simple sorry doesn’t always make everything better. Overall, Pips life has been changed drastically we have witnessed only the start of a whirlwind of reality and hard valuable lessons.

    Reply
    1. Laila Sayegh

      I agree that this is only the start of the lessons Pip will learn! I think that none of his mistakes have had very many consequences in the past and I think they will come back to him and he will regret it.

      Reply
  20. Casey

    In this chapter, Pip is inside during a storm when he hears footsteps coming up the stairs. It turns out to be his convict from many years ago. They start to talk and the convict confesses that he was the one who gave Pip all the money which allowed him to go to London to become a gentleman. This completely shocks Pip. For all of these years, Pip thought that Miss Havisham gave him all the money because of how much time he spent with her and Estella, now he feels lied to. He realizes that Miss Havisham was just using him to “train” Estella in a way, to break hearts. He comes to the conclusion that he and Estella were never meant to be together, he was just a way for Estella to get better at breaking men’s hearts, which she successfully broke Pip’s. It makes me wonder if Pip will come crawling back to Biddy after what Estella did to him.

    Reply
    1. Zoe

      I agree that Pip was being used by Mrs.Havisham to train Estella. Do you think over all the training that Estella has actually fallen in love with Pip? I feel like from all the defiance Estella has shown lately to Mrs.Havisham that she might get out of the house and be able to do what she wants instead of being pushed around by her adopted mother.

      Reply
  21. Laila Sayegh

    In chapter 39 of Great Expectations, we realize that Pip’s convict from the beginning of the novel had been the person who had given him the opportunity to become a gentleman.
    When Pip encounters the convict, all the convict would do is praise him. At first, Pip was hesitant and didn’t know how to act but I think Pip realized that the one good deed he did when he was seven had paved a pathway of opportunity for him. This showed Pip that what comes around goes around. Therefore, if he does something good he will get something good in return. The convict continues to praise Pip and tell him that he would be able to get any woman. Which leads me to my next point. Estella.
    Throughout the course of the novel, Pip believed that Miss Havisham was the person providing him with his wealth. Now that he knows the truth, any hopes of being with Estella he believed were gone. This gives Pip a new perspective on everything. He also begins to feel guilty about his personal family life and how he had left them all behind in hopes of becoming a gentleman when Estella should not have been his number one priority. I think (and hope) that Pip will fix broken relationships with his family.
    All in all, this was a very important chapter. The convict may not realize it but he did do something great for Pip in this chapter. He showed Pip a new perspective. I hope that we see Pip develop further in Volume Three.

    Reply
    1. Hannah M.

      I agree that his dream of being in a happy relationship with Estella was crushed by the news of who his real benefactor, the convict, is. I hope to see him further develop too!

      Reply
  22. Zoe

    In chapter 29, a huge turning point occurred in Pip’s life. The entire time of his expectations Pip had thought that Mrs.Havisham was the one who had gave him his fortune. However, in this chapter, Pip is approached by someone who seems like a stranger. Pip finally realized it’s his convict, and the convict says that he gave him the fortune. Although the convict was excited for Pip, Pip’s blood was running cold. He was so devastated that he couldn’t even form words, and now this man was sleeping in his house. All his hopes for getting Estella were crushed. He feels like he’s been living a lie; pretending to be a high class gentle man when he had really been sponsored the whole time by a bottom class criminal who could be arrested and hanged at any moment. He seemed ashamed of himself. That night, he is paranoid and can only sleep after he locks the door on the convict. At this point, I think Pip will try to talk to Mrs.Havisham again and ask her if she would have ever giving him this lifestyle as well. I can see a lot of change in Pip coming in the future.

    Reply
  23. Hannah M.

    Chapter 38 was a huge turning point for Pip. Pip finds out his former convict is his benefactor. All this time he thought it was Miss Havisham, but this chapter shows otherwise. As Pip is walking in his house he heads towards the basement. He hears an unusual sound coming towards the stairs. He realizes the noises are footsteps. The footsteps get louder and louder as it comes closer and closer to Pip. Pip then says, “There is someone down there, is there not?” As the mysterious man replies, “yes” Pip recognizes that dark voice. The man walks slowly up the stairs in a spooky manner. Pip’s blood goes cold when he sees his former convict in front of the basement door. He couldn’t get it fixed into his mind that his CONVICT is sleeping in HIS house! Pip’s heart shatters into a million pieces, realizing his goals in life were crushed and that all he has been doing and working hard for, were crushed. His benefactor was a lowlife criminal! I would be grateful for what the convict did for Pip. The convict is making Pip become wealthy and is also using all of his own money to make Pip happy. The convict did this because he is ever so grateful for when Pip fed and quenched his thirst when he was in need of it. The convict has changed a lot and I think some change will occur in Pip’s character in these next few chapters!

    Reply
  24. johnh1

    In this chapter Pip learns that his convict really gave him all the money. This ruins a lot of what Pip has worked for and thought. He was never made into a gentleman by Ms. Havisham for Estella. Also, he left Joe for nothing. A criminal gave him his money and paid for him. This ruins everything he thought and did.

    Reply
  25. Emily

    Chapter 39 was a crucial turning point in Pip’s life and overall character because he finally discovered who his mysterious benifactor is. The big reveal was that the dirty convict that Pip met in the marshes all of those years ago was the person that had been supporting the lavish lifestyle that Pip had dreamed of. Ever since Pip first found out that he was to become a gentleman, he has been wondering who provided him with all of this money. The obvious person would have been Mrs. Havisham, seeing as Pip spent much of his childhood around her. However, the truth is that Pip’s money if from a criminal.

    This is someone who has haunted Pip ever since the night they first met in the graveyard. When the convict puts his hands on Pip’s shoulders, Pip thinks, “I shuddered at the thought that for anything I knew, his hand might be stained with blood.” This thought shows that Pip is still scared of the convict. Even though the convict has served his time in prison and for the last couple of years he has been a sheep herder, Pip does not think that he has changed. He does not know what the convict is capable of and he is terrified by the thought that he does not even know what the convict did to be sent to prison. No one knows exactly what the convict is capable of and the unknown is never good.

    Moreover, the novel, Great Expectations is a coming of age novel. Up to this point we have only seen Pip changing for the worse, since he abandoned his old home in pursuit of wealth. However, all of that changed in this chapter when Pip finally realized that his actions come with a consiquense. He realizes that he left his family that loves him for a life of being surronded by people that only care about his money, not his personality. He thinks, “I would not have gone back to Joe now, I would not have gone back to Biddy now, for any consideration;simply I suppose because my sense of my own worthless conduct to them was greater than any consideration.” Pip knows that he messed up all of the good parts of his life and that there is no way to go back to the way things used to be. This relates back to the motif of prison, because Pip is trapped in a world where he has no one to go.

    Reply

Leave a Reply to Rcey Ortega Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*