September 24

It was but a day gone, and Joe had brought the tears into my eyes; they had soon dried, God forgive me! soon dried.

In chapters 27, 28, and 29 Pip comes into contact again with various people from home.  Discuss how his relationships with these characters have evolved since he came to London and how this evolution contributes to the reader’s understanding of Pip’s development.  Use many specific details from the text to support your opinions.  Be sure, also, that you comment on at least one other comment in this thread.

 GE blog #9


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Posted September 24, 2018 by equinson in category Great Expectations

44 thoughts on “It was but a day gone, and Joe had brought the tears into my eyes; they had soon dried, God forgive me! soon dried.

  1. Myles Ng

    In these chapters Pip is reunited with some people from back home. He meets up with Joe, his only friend back home. Instead of it being a happy, joyous occasion it is awkward and Pip is down right rude to Joe. When Pip gets the note he doesn’t want the meet to happen. “If I could have kept him away by paying money, I certainty would have paid money.” This sentence shows great change in Pip, It shows he now believes if he throws money at a problem it will go away. Joe is very awkward at the meets to, he keeps calling Pip sir and tries to act polite in front of him. Pip is disgusted by every impolite act that Joe commits. This whole scene shows how a change of status, scenery, and people have influenced Pip. Pip also meets with Estella. She seems not as mean to him and seems to respect him more since he is a gentlemen. Pip believe’s this could be a part of Ms. Havisham’s plan to bring them together. “She had adopted Estella, and she had as good as adopted me, and it could not fail to be her intentions to bring us together.” I think Ms. Havisham still wants to have Estella break Pip’s heart. These three chapters have shown great change in Pip, how he treats people, how he sees people, and how he acts around people.

    Reply
    1. mirandak

      I definitely agree with your statement that Pip now believes that he can just “throw his money” around and solve his problems. He has become so reckless with his new fortune and affluence that I wish it was never bestowed upon him in the first place!

      Reply
  2. Emily

    When Pip is reunited with people from back home he acts completely different. When he discovered that Joe was going to come visit him, he was not delighted, but rather annoyed. On page 218 he thinks “ If I could have kept him away by paying him money, I certainly would have paid him money.” Even though Joe used to be Pip’s best friend, it is like that relationship means nothing to him now. Pip used to be excited to be around Joe, but now he can not be bothered. He is ashamed of him because of unimportant things like the way he dresses and how he is not rich or smart. These things would not have mattered to the old Pip, but to the new PIp they mean the world.
    On the contrary, when Pip sees Estella he is exactly the same like he was all of those years ago. At first he thinks that he is over her and that was just a part of his past. However, all of that changed when he first laid eyes on her. When Pip first sees Estella he thinks, “as I looked at her, I slipped hopelessly back into the course and common boy again. O the sense of distance and disparity that came upon me, and the inaccessibility that came about her!” Pip thought he could change, and in many ways he did. However it was not enough to change his feelings for Estella. She is the reason that he wanted to become a gentleman in the first place. Although, this was not enough because she still looks down at him and treats him like a young boy who is destined to become a blacksmith. I predict that Pip is going to keep pushing away Joe and everything else from his past, until he is a completely different person. He will do this to try to be with Estella and he will never get her. I think that ultimately Pip will keep chasing something that he can never have.

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    1. Emma Garbowitz

      I totally agree how Estella is acting very similar to how she was before Pip left for London. I also question why do you think Miss Havisham wants Pip to really love Estella and wants him to get with her.

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    2. jaclynl

      I agree and think that Pip is making a mistake by choosing Estella over Joe. He and Joe have been best friends for the longest time and he shouldn’t throw that away.

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  3. Emma Garbowitz

    Throughout the past few chapters, Pip is reunited with many people from the past. First of all, Joe came to visit Pip to give him a message from Miss Havisham. Instead of being extremely exited to be reunited with Joe, Pip still feels ashamed of him and it is almost as if he didn’t want Joe to come visit. Pip thinks that Joe definitely does not fit in at London because of the way he talks, there way he dresses, and because of the job he has. The text states, “Let me confess exactly, with what feelings I looked forward to Joe’s coming. Not with pleasure, though I was bound to him by so many ties; no; with considerable disturbance, some mortification, and a keen sense of incongruity.” This shows how embarrassed Pip really is of his family and especially Joe. In my opinion, I was extremely shocked that Pip no longer wants to have a good relationship with Joe. I think now that Pip has money, fancy clothes, and the education he desires he is only thinking upon himself and not anyone else. Although How is of a lower class and may not have the best education, he is still a good person and is trying his hardest to do the best that he can do. However, Pip no longer sees the greatness in Joe and no longer sees him as his best friend. Joe and Pip’s relationship has definitely been ruined because of the way Pip now looks upon Joe.

    However, when Pip visits Miss Havisham’s house to go to see Estella, not much has changed about her. Although Estella became much prettier, her personality did not change much at all. Estella is still looking upon Pip as a young boy who hasn’t changed and is meant to be just a common boy. Pip tried to get over Estella numerous times but as soon as he laid his eyes upon her again, he just falls right back in love with her. The text states, “…Estella looked more bright and beautiful as than before, and I was under stronger enchantment.” This just shows how much Pip is deeply in love with Estella and how he cannot get over her. Also, throughout this visit Estella even goes on to tell Pip that she has no heart and will never feel sympathy or regret for others. Furthermore, she goes on to say that she will never love anyone as well. But, even after knowing this, Pip still finds a way to love Estella all the same. Lastly, just like when he was a young boy, it seems as though Miss Havisham is still pushing Pip into loving Estella. It is almost as if Estella is a love toy and Pip is falling right into Miss Havisham’s trap. The text states, “Far into the night, Miss Havisham’s words, ‘Love her, love her, love her!’ sounded in my ears. I adapted them into my own repetition, and said to my pillow, ‘I love her, I love her, I love her!’ hundreds of times.” It is almost as if Miss Havisham has put Pip under a love spell so that he will fall deeply in love with Estella. Therefore, I think that when Pip saw people he hasn’t seen for some time, many things have changed but many things have also stayed the same.

    Reply
  4. jaclynl

    When Pip meets again with some people back home, he seems to have a whole different attitude towards some of them. For example, when he finds out that Joe is coming to visit him, he is not happy at all and is more embarrassed by him. This definitely does show how he has changed as a person because he used to love seeing Joe and be extremely close to him. With this, I think that Pip will end up losing Joe as a friend eventually if he keeps acting then way and eventually regret it when he’s a little bit wiser. I think that treating Joe this way is a huge mistake that Pip is making even if he doesn’t see it now.

    With Estella, though, Pip acts the complete opposite way. He is delighted to see her and even still has all of those feelings that he had felt years ago. In my opinion, I think that Pip is holding onto something that can never be his. “Then, a burst of gratitude came upon me, that she should be destined for me, once the blacksmith’s boy.” (pg. 243) Pip has been waiting for years for something that is very likely to never happen and believes with all his heart that it will. In the end, I think that he may just end up hurt. Pip is chasing the wrong person here. While he’s pushing away Joe, who he could end up having a lifetime bond with, he is putting his heart and soul into the hope of him and Estella, which is not worth it. I hope that maybe Pip will realize this eventually and start talking to Joe again like he did years ago. I really want Pip to make the right choice here.

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  5. maxwellw

    In chapters 27 through 29 Pip sees encounters people from his “common” life. One such person is Joe. Joe comes to visit Pip in London. Because Pip worries that Joe will disapprove of his opulent lifestyle and that Drummle will look down on him because of Joe, Joe’s visit is strained and awkward. Joe attempts to inform Pip of the news from home: Wopsle, for instance, has become an actor. But Pip remains annoyed until Joe mentions that Estella has returned to Satis House and that she wants to see Pip. Pip then becomes more kindly toward Joe, but the blacksmith leaves before Pip can improve his poor behavior. Pip later travels home and is forced to share a coach with a pair of convicts, one a which is the mysterious stranger who gave Pip money in the pub. Pip overhears him explaining that the convict Pip helped a long time ago in the marshes had asked him to deliver the money to Pip, but Pip soon learns that Pumblechook is claiming responsibility for Pips newly found wealth. Pip’s behavior throughout this period is not admirable: he treats Joe with hostility during his visit to London and acts coldly throughout this section. The difference between Pip the character and Pip the narrator becomes clear here. When he visits Satis House, Pip the character feels irritated and unhappy at the thought of visiting Joe, but Pip the narrator judges himself harshly for having felt that way, writing “God forgive me!” in Chapter 29. As a character, Pip is in the grip of his immediate emotions, but as a narrator, he has the capacity to look at his life from a broader perspective and to judge himself. Finally, when Pip finally reaches Estella, he becomes overwhelmed with her beauty and mentally reverts back to when he was a boy, possibly saying that though Pip has acquired great wealth, he is still “common”.

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  6. Hannah Pitkofsky

    Pip meets up with a few characters from home in these chapters: Joe and Estella. Even though they are from the same place (generally), Pip’s reaction to seeing them again, however, are completely different.
    When Pip meets up with Joe again for the first time since he left for London, he is embarrassed by him and is not happy at all that he is here. He thinks Joe doesn’t belong in London because of how he looks, speaks, holds himself, etc. “Let me confess exactly, with what feelings I looked forward to Joe’s coming. Not with pleasure, though I was bound to him by so many ties; no; with considerable disturbance, some mortification, and a keen sense of incongruity.” I think that Pip has been misguided by the money and by Estella/Ms. Havisham so much that he isn’t excited to see his guardian figure who has been with him almost Pip’s entire life.
    On the other hand, he sees Estella again, Pip is having confused emotions about her at first, but he is eventually ecstatic to see her again and states, “Then, a burst of gratitude came upon me, that she should be destined for me, once the blacksmith’s boy.” This showed that Pip had changed and would prefer Estella over Joe and his family. I can infer that one of two things would happen: either Pip keeps pushing Joe and his family away and goes toward Estella OR he could learn to care for both Joe and Estella and would have a long, hard path ahead of him, but it would lead to a much happier ending!

    Reply
    1. Brishti Sarkar

      I think what you stated is true. Although I want the second option to be true, I think, judging from the way Pip acts now, he will keep pushing Joe and Biddy and his old life away.

      Reply
  7. Casey

    In these chapters, Pip reconnects with his family and friends from home. First, he finds out that Joe is coming to visit him in London. I thought he would be overjoyed because Joe was the person closest to him at home, but he was actually annoyed. He thinks that since he is in London and has money that he is better that everyone else in his hometown. Once he returns home, he is most excited to see Estella. He wants to love her but he just doesn’t. She is still the same mean person. Pip says, “Far into the night, Miss Havisham’s words, ‘Love her, love her, love her!’ sounded in my ears. I adapted them into my own repetition, and said to my pillow, ‘I love her, I love her, I love her!’ hundreds of times.” Maybe Miss Havisham wants Pip to love Estella so she can get revenge in a way. Miss Havisham was devastated when her fiancé took her money and left her on her wedding day. That’s why she wears a wedding dress and stopped all her clocks. I think she sees herself in Estella. She wants Estella to break Pip’s heart before he breaks hers. Miss Havisham wishes she believed her cousin, Mathew Pocket, and never have trusted her fiancé. She wants to get back at him for breaking her heart through Pip and Estella.

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  8. Laila Sayegh

    In chapters 27 through 29 of Great Expectations, Pip encounters many different people from his past. We, as readers, get to see how Pip’s relationships with these people have changed and how they have stayed the same.
    The first person Pip reunites with is Joe Gargery. Pip and Joe had an extremely awkward and uncomfortable interaction. For starters, Joe seems very intimidated by Pip now that he is a “gentleman”. Narrator Pip says, “Having borne this flattering testimony to the merits of our dwelling-place, and having incidentally shown this tendency to call me ‘sir,’ Joe, being invited to sit down a the table, looked all around the room for a suitable spot on which to deposit his hat” (Pg. 221) This quote shows how Joe’s personality has changed around Pip. Instead of being comfortable with him, he proceeds to refer to Pip as “sir.” Also, when Joe stammers for a place to put his house, it goes to show how uncomfortable Joe was being in the presence of Pip. Clearly, Joe felt as though Pip was in a way higher class than him.
    The next two important people Pip encounters from his past are Miss Havisham and Estella. It has been several years since Pip has made a visit to the Satis House. The first person he greets at the door is Orlick, who he is shocked to see is now working in Miss Havisham’s home. When Pip greets Miss Havisham, he doesn’t even recognize Estella in the room with them. Pip sees that Estella had looked more beautiful than ever before. At that moment, Pip was greeted with feelings from the past. Narrator Pip says, “I fancied, as I looked at her, that I slipped hopelessly back into the coarse and common boy again.” (Pg. 235) After being in London for so long, Pip felt uncommon. Now that he sees Estella, he feels like his uncommonness cannot even compare to hers. Estella’s personality towards Pip had hardly changed. She still treats him as though he is just a boy. To break Pip’s spirit, even more, she says that she doesn’t remember many of the moments from the day that the two had met one another. Miss Havisham’s personality towards had not changed very much either. She is still mourning over her wedding and still is longing for Estella to break Pip’s heart. Miss Havisham wants Pip to fall madly in love with Estella. She kept repeating the words, “love her” to Pip. Clearly, these words got in Pip’s head because that night Pip kept repeating the words, “I love her!”
    Some things just never changed for Pip. He still is head over heels for Estella. I am excited to see how Pip’s relationships with Joe, Miss Havisham and Estella continue to change or stay the same in the future.

    Reply
    1. mikaylaf

      I agree! I find it so weird that Joe calls Pip ‘sir’, do you? Also, I like how you said Estella is breaking Pip’s spirit by saying she doesn’t remember any of the moments they shared. It seems to me that she does remember them, she just wants to see if her ‘not remembering them’ will have a negative impact on Pip, which it did. Nice response!

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  9. mikaylaf

    In these chapters, Pip is reunited with people of his past. First, Pip sees Joe. We don’t know how much time has passed since they last saw each other, but nevertheless Pip is not as excited as I thought he’d be for the reunion. In fact, he seems to be completely dreading it. If Pip, “…could have kept him away by paying money, I [Pip] would have certainly paid money.” (page 218) The sentence is very depressing to me. Pip is saying that if he could pay Joe, the man who has been his friend and fatherly figure, to keep him away, he would have. The text states, “Then he fell into such unaccountable fits of meditation, with his fork midway between his plate and his mouth; had his eyes attracted in such strange directions; was afflicted with such remarkable coughs; sat so far from the table, and dropped so much more than he ate, and pretended that he hadn’t dropped it; that I was heartily glad when Herbert left us for the City.” (page 222) It is horrible that Pip is still embarrassed of Joe even though he no longer lives with him and he has become a gentleman. This shows the reader that there is no chance of Pip ever returning to his old life where he was content and happy. The reason for Joe’s visit was to tell Pip personally that Estella has come home and Miss Havisham wishes for him to come visit them. Upon hearing this news, Pip immediately makes plans to return to his hometown the next day.

    When Pip goes to Miss Havisham’s house, not much has changed. However, there is a new gatekeeper, who is none other than Orlick! Pip was just as surprised as I was to find Orlick working for Miss Havisham. Miss Havisham is the same as she was many years before. She is still wearing the same wedding dress and sitting in the same chair as she always is. Despite this, Estella’s appearance has changed a lot. The text states, “The lady who I had never seen before, lifted her eyes up and looked archly at me, and then I saw that the eyes were Estella’s eyes. But she was so much changed, and was so much more beautiful, so much more womanly, in all things winning admiration had made such wonderful advance, that I seemed to have made none.” (page 235) Pip didn’t even recognize Estella at first. But even though her appearance changed, her personality did not. Estella still treats Pip like the coarse and common boy he once was. In addition, Miss Havisham still wants Pip to fall in love with Estella, which I think he has. She says to him that he should “love her!” the way she once did. Pip gives in to Miss Havisham, and all throughout the night he tells himself, “I love her!” I am curious to see how this ‘love’ will play itself out, and if Pip and Estella will ever end up together.

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  10. Sophie

    In chapters 27-29, Pip reunites with important people from his old life. He sees three people, Joe, Miss Havisham, and Estella. Definitely there were exciting chapters! The first person he sees is Joe, which you would think would be a joyous happy occasion. Unfortunately though, it was not. Once again Pip is ashamed of Joe, which honestly did not surprise me. I expected Pip’s opinion of Joe stay the same. The thing that did surprise me however was the way Joe was treating Pip. Joe must have considered himself a lower class compared to Pip, resulting in awkward formal greetings and the confrontation of “sir”. This was no doubt not the reunion anybody had in mind.
    When Pip then finds how he is wanted to visit Miss Havisham again, he eagerly agrees and does not waste any time, because as soon as you knew it he was back in his home town heading towards the large home. It’s been clear for while that Pip has special feelings for Estella, making the whole situation even more exciting! Sadly for Pip, Estella’s personality has not changed at all. She still treats him as if he were a young common boy, with arrogance and forgetfulness. She claims to have no memory of their past. As for her looks however, Estella must have grown up because Pip continuously marvels about how beautiful she has gotten. Definitely one of the biggest events Pip goes through is Miss Havisham pretty much peer pressuring him to fall in love with Estella. Clearly it worked, because Pip went to bed that night thinking to himself just how much he loved her. I think Pip’s stronger feelings towards Estella will play a key part in Pips personality and future events.

    Reply
    1. stephaniec

      I agree with the last sentence, in the sense that Pip’s love for Estella will play a role in the way he acts and thinks in events to come.

      Reply
  11. Brishti Sarkar

    Pip reunites with many significant people from his past in chapters 27-29. The first person he reunites with is Joe. Joe is very happy and excited to see Pip, but Pip is rather ashamed and unhappy when he hears that Joe is coming to visit. Their meeting goes very awkward, and Pip remains annoyed all the while. Pip says that “If [he] could have kept him away by paying money, [he] certainly would have paid money.”(p.218). This shows that he was so bothered by Joe coming, that he would have paid money to keep him away. During the visit, Pip is uninterested in whatever Joe says, until he informs Pip that he is here to deliver news from Miss Havisham, saying that she wants him to come visit and that Estella was there. After he delivers the message, they decide that it is best that they part ways for good. Joe says that he must stay to his work, and that it is best for Pip to continue his studies away from him. I think that in the future, when Pip loses Joe for good, he will realize that he was too hard on Joe and should have been kinder towards him, and that he should not have chosen Estella and Miss Havisham over Joe.
    The next person Pip reunites with from his past is the strange man from the Three Jolly Bargeman who had given him the two-pound note. Although they do not talk, each one is aware of the other’s presence. This happens on the coach ride back to Pip’s village. The convict tells the story about the “two-pound note”, and Pip is creeped out by this. After Pip gets off, he reunites with Orlick, who is Miss Havisham’s new gatekeeper. They mock each other for a while, and then Pip goes to Miss Havisham and Estella. Miss Havisham remained the same in her wedding dress, but Estella had changed dramatically. Now, she is more woman-like, and Pip falls more in love with her and convinces himself that they were meant to be. However, Estella does not remember anything that happened as kids. Pip recalls, “I verily believe that her not remembering and not minding in the least, made me cry again, inwardly – and that is the sharpest crying of all.”(p.237). This shapes their relationship because that shows how one sided everything is, and how Pip’s fantasies won’t ever come true. Overall, these chapters helped shape Pip’s relationships with many characters by having him reunite with those from the earlier portion of his life.

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  12. mirandak

    Over the course of chapters 27-29, Pip is reunited with people that are so reminiscent of his childhood, and in a sense “rekindles” his relationships with them,” although in a way that is quite contradictory to that of which the readers may have expected. Essentially, while these folks have come to represent Pip’s entire youth as a whole, his encounters with them now are entirely different to experiences of which he shared with them when he was younger, giving the reader an idea of just how much he has come to change.
    Firstly, we see Pip as he reconvenes with his old friend and best buddy, Joe Gargery. However, rather than a joyous moment of reconciliation and exhilaration, Pip recalls that he hadn’t even wanted Joe to visit him in the first place! For instance, this is shown when in the text it states, “Not with pleasure, though I was bound to him by so many ties; no; with considerable disturbance, some mortification, and a keen sense of incongruity. If I could have kept him away by paying money, I certainly would have paid money.” (p.218) After reading this particular phrase of Pip’s, I was completely and utterly disgusted by the young man he had become. How could he say such things of his best friend? Did he feel as if he were now above the likes of Joe due to his fortune and new position in higher society? Furthermore, he so evidently said that if he could have wasted his own money just so he didn’t have to meet up with Joe once more, he would have done so in a heartbeat. How disgraceful and shameful! Now that Pip has a surplus of affluence, he has begun to believe that money will fix all of his problems, and has even become reckless in its utilization/thoughts of its utilization! Moreover, when Joe finally arrives there, Pip the narrator describes how his younger self had thought of the event with such misery, and even felt a sense of discomfiture about Joe, especially in terms of his behavior around Herbert. For instance, Pip’s shameful feelings of Joe are shown when in the text it states, “As to his shirt-collar, and his coat-collar, they were perplexing to reflect upon – insoluble mysteries both. Why should a man scrape himself to that extent, before he could consider himself full dressed? Why should he suppose it necessary to be purified by suffering for his holiday clothes? Then he fell into such unaccountable fits of meditation, with his fork midway between his plate and his mouth; had his eyes attracted in such strange directions; was afflicted with such remarkable coughs; sat so far from the table, and dropped so much more than he ate, and pretended that he hadn’t dropped it; that I was heartily glad when Herbert left us for the city.
    I had neither the good sense nor the good feeling to know that this was all my fault, and that if I had been easier with Joe, Joe would have been easier with me. I felt impatient of him and out of temper with him; in which condition he heaped coals of fire on my head.” (p.222)
    However, I feel as if this embarrassment and/or anger is misplaced and not fair, as Joe was not raised as a gentleman, and so any wrongdoings in terms of proper etiquette or manners in higher society are not of his own fault (he was never taught of them in the environment that he was raised in). Also, seeing Pip’s disappointment and disapproval of Joe definitely caused me to be upset, as I absolutely adore Joe’s character. So, hopefully, he will soon come to his senses and remember why Joe is such a wonderful and sweet person, a father figure, and previously his best friend.
    In addition, later on in the novel, whether by coincidence or by fate, Pip happens to be riding on a coach from London, heading back to his old town (as requested by Miss Havisham), when he sees someone familiar. The strange man, or “other convict” whom he had met with that night with Joe and Mr. Wopsle in the “Three Jolly Bargemen!” For example, Pip’s realization of the identity of this man and the sense of fear that follows it is shown when in the text it states, “…I had no cause to be surprised when Herbert, meeting me in the yard, came up and told me there were two convicts going down with me. But I had a reason that was an old reason now, for constitutionally faltering whenever I heard the word convict… One was a taller and stouter man than the other, and appeared as a matter of course, according to the mysterious ways of the world both convict and free, to have had allotted to him the smaller suit of clothes. His arms and legs were like great pincushions of those shapes, and his attire disguised him absurdly; but I knew his half-closed eye at one glance. There stood the man whom I had seen on the settle at the Three Jolly Bargemen on a Saturday night, and who had brought me down with his invisible gun!” (p.226-227) Essentially, once Pip had realized who this man was, it provoked him to suddenly remember the terrifying experiences of his childhood and his contact with convicts that had tormented him for years to come. This led to all of his old feelings of fear, guilt, and worry to rush back to him so much so that he began to grow paranoid that the man would recognize him soon! For instance, this feeling of immense paranoia is shown when in the text it states, “After overhearing this dialogue, I should assuredly have got down and been left in the solitude and darkness of the highway, but for feeling certain that the man had no suspicion of my identity. Indeed, I was not only so changed in the course of nature, but so differently dressed and so differently circumstanced, that it was not at all likely he could have known me without accidental help. Still, the coincidence of our being together on the coach, was sufficiently strange to fill me with a dread that some other coincidence might at any moment connect me, in his hearing, with my name. For this reason, I resolved to alight as soon as we touched the town, and put myself out of his hearing. This device I executed successfully. My little portmanteau was in the boot under my feet; I had but to turn a hinge to get it out: I threw it down before me, got down after it, and was left at the first lamp on the first stones of the town pavement.” (p.229-230) Basically, he was overwhelmed with memories of his eventful childhood, and just as he wanted desperately to escape it back then, he now wanted to escape it once more for fear that it will come back to haunt him again.
    Lastly, Pip visits the infamous duo of Miss Havisham and Estella. Essentially, while Miss Havisham is more or less in the same state in which she has always been, Estella was said to have changed a great deal! She now had a new sense of refined elegance and grace, as described by Pip. In fact, she had changed so much so that he didn’t even recognize her at first! For example, this is shown when in the text it states, “She was in her chair near the old table, in the old dress, with her two hands crossed on her stick, her chin resting on them, and her eyes on the fire. Sitting near her, with the white shoe that had never been worn, in her hand, and her head bent as she looked at it, was an elegant lady whom I had never seen… The lady whom I had never seen before, lifted up her eyes and looked archly at me, and then I saw that the eyes were Estella’s eyes. But she was so much changed, was so much more beautiful, so much more womanly, in all things winning admiration had made such wonderful advance, that I seemed to have made none. I fancied, as I looked at her, that I slipped hopelessly back into the coarse and common boy again. O the sense of distance and disparity that came upon me, and the inaccessibility that came about her!” (p.234-235) Also, I found it quite interesting to consider that just as Pip’s becoming a gentleman had struck a great change in his character, Estella’s becoming a lady had also had a rather massive impact on her as well! Now, not only had she changed physically, but also mentally/emotionally! She no longer seemed to emit that aura of rudeness that Pip had associated with her so much when he had first met her, as she now had such poise and better manners. Additionally, perhaps now that Pip is at least of a somewhat similar position in society to Estella, she might now finally return his feelings/fall in love with him (now that he is no longer a common boy)! Also, his visit to Satis House also escalated quite a bit when Estella had left for a few moments, and Pip was left to talk to Miss Havisham alone. Suddenly, she called out to him, almost desperately, for him to love Estella! For example, this is shown when in the text it states, “‘Hear me, Pip! I adopted her to be loved. I bred her and educated her, to be loved. I developed her into what she is, that she might be loved. Love her!'” (p.240) Although this statement took me by such surprise when I first read it, as I continued to reread it, I began to think that maybe this is a result of Miss Havisham’s having her heart broken earlier in her life, and perhaps she doesn’t want Estella to go through the same, and so she is begging him to love her (even if she doesn’t have to because he already does). Unfortunately, I am only left to my theories and predictions as to why she behaved in this way, as Dickens did not elaborate in this part of the novel, but hopefully, he will come to explain it later on!
    Fundamentally, these visits with those of Pip’s bizarre childhood have certainly opened my eyes as a reader to see just how much Pip has grown as a character. The ways in which he had interacted with them back then are nothing like the experiences he has had with them now, as he now acts as if he is a completely different person altogether. I found that their re-entering his life was such a spectacular tactic that Dickens used, as it allows the readers to go back and compare his times with them back then to his time with them now, and see how much his character has developed as the novel progresses.

    Reply
    1. angelicac1

      I definitely agree with your last sentence! Dicken’s tactic worked on all of us readers and now I’m eager to learn how Pip’s character will evolve even more throughout the novel.

      Reply
  13. angelicac1

    Throughout chapters 27-29, Pip comes into contact again with various people from home such as Joe, Miss Havisham, and Estella. His reactions to seeing these people have changed ever since he came to London. The first reunion was with Joe. I thought that Pip would feel some sort of excitement bubbling through him, but instead Pip felt quite the opposite. He felt ashamed of Joe. The following sentence from the text reveals Pip’s true thoughts on Joe sowing to reunite with him: “Let me confess exactly, with what feelings I looked forward to Joe’s coming. Not with pleasure, though I was bound to him by so many ties; no; with considerable disturbance, some mortification, and a keen sense of incongruity.” It is also stated that if Pip could have kept Joe away by paying money, Pip would’ve certainly paid the money. It hurts me to see how Pip thought of such a thing.

    When visiting Miss Havisham and Estella, Pip’s attitude and thoughts didn’t changed much. Just like before, Miss Havisham didn’t change much. She still wore her old wedding dress and she still had her cold persona. Miss Havisham was peer pressuring Pip to love the one and only, Estella. Estella’s personality and attitude didn’t change, however, her image did and that had an impact on Pip. In the story, the text states, “The lady who I had never seen before, lifted her eyes up and looked archly at me, and then I saw that the eyes were Estella’s eyes. But she was so much changed, and was so much more beautiful, so much more womanly, in all things winning admiration had made such wonderful advance, that I seemed to have made none.” She changed so much that Pip didn’t even recognize her! His visit to Estella brought back his feelings for her and I’m eager to learn how their “love” will play out.

    Reply
    1. trinityt

      I agree. I’m excited to see what will happen between Estella and Pip. I’m also curious about what will happen between Pip and Biddy.

      Reply
  14. johnh1

    in these chapters Pip goes home and meets up with characters from earlier. Joe seems to see him on a higher level when he meets up with him. Pip goes back to his hometown and to Ms. Havisham’s house. She encourages him to keep loving Estella. Pip tries to become better and in doing so avoids Joe.

    Reply
  15. Kate Ma.

    Pip meets up with a couple of old characters from the beginning of the book. First Pip meets Joe after a long time of not even talking to him. I thought that Pip would be ecstatic that Joe would be coming to town and visiting but he reacts very differently than expected. Pip receives a letter from Biddy regarding Joe’s visit to London. Pip reacts by saying, “if I could have kept him away by paying money, I certainly would have paid money.” This shows how Pip really feels about Joe. Imagine not seeing you father for about a year and wishing he wouldn’t visit. Pip doesn’t even visit his loving family when he comes back home for a girl that treated him poorly. The girl that Pip comes home for is Estella. Once Joe delivered the news about Estella’s wish to see Pip, Pip immediately went home to see her. I think Pip was being very ignorant and selfish when he was so rude to Joe but he runs home and would do anything for Estella. Pip says, “Far into the night, Miss Havisham’s words echoed in my head and said into my pillow, I love her, I love her, I love her!” Pip’s love obviously falls with Estella instead of his family who he couldn’t care less about. Pip reunites with two very important characters and treats them both very differently then how he would before London.

    Reply
    1. Hannah M.

      I had the same prediction about Joe and pip meeting! It was very sad to see their real reactions. What happened to the old Pip and Joe!?
      I agree with your explanation of their reactions!

      Reply
  16. Hannah M.

    In chapters 27, 28, and 29 Pip meets up with old characters back at home. When Pip goes to meet Pip he sees him as a higher classed fellow. Pip seemed ashamed of Joe. For example in the text is says that if Pip could pay money to keep Joe away he would pay the money. I think that’s a horrible thing for Pip to say about Joe. His reaction contrasted greatly from what I thought would have happened. I thought Pip would be excited to see Joe, for he is like a best friend to Pip, but this showed me otherwise.
    Pip then visited Miss Havisham’s house. At Miss Havishams house he sees bot Miss Havisham and Estella. Miss Havisham hasn’t changed for she is still in her wedding dress. On the other hand,Pip didn’t even recognize Estella because she changed so much since Pip last saw her which was before he departed to London. In the text pip describes her as even more beautiful then before. Miss Havisham pressures Pip into keeping his love for Estella, so when Pip saw how much more beautiful Estella has gotten his feelings for her came rushing to him like a cheetah going after its prey! These chapters have me thinking about how Estella will treat Pip and how their relationship will grow!

    Reply
    1. Zoe

      I agree that Pip has changed greatly and has become even more embarrassed with Joe. I also think the fact that Joe kept putting his hat in places where it kept falling off emphasized the fact that he lived such a simple, poor life and that Pip has changed drastically from a young boy with thick boots and coarse hands, to a respectable gentle men who, however, is ashamed of his past.

      Reply
  17. MadiR

    Through out chapters 27, 28, and 29 Pip is reunited with various people from his past. Pip first meets up with Joe when he comes to London to see him. Joe came to London to tell Pip that Ms. Havisham would like to see him because Estella was back. While Joe was in London he acted and treated Pip differently. “Us two being now alone, Sir,- began Joe. Joe, I interrupted, pettishly, how can you call me Sir?”(page 222) During Joe and Pip’s breakfast Joe kept calling Pip “Sir” and a gentleman. I think Joe sees Pip differently now that he is in London. Joe is not the only one who has changed. When Pip goes to see Ms. Havisham he finds that Estella has become a beautiful young lady. At first Pip did not even recognize her. Estella’s attitude and personality has also changed. “You must know, said Estella, condescending to me as a brilliant and beautiful woman might, that I have no heart – if that has anything to do with my memory.” Pip’s relationship with Joe and Estella have changed drastically while he was in London.

    Reply
  18. Rcey Ortega

    In chapters 27-29, Pip encounters people back from home. First, he meets up with Joe but doesn’t really want too. “If I could keep him away by paying money, I certainly would have paid money.” (Pg 218) This shows that Pip would do anything to not meet with Joe. When Joe arrives, he tells Pip that Estella wants to see him at Ms. Havisham’s house. Pip got really excited because Estella actually wanted to see him. “I felt my face fire up as I looked at Joe.” (Pg 224) This shows that Pip would like to see Estella as well.
    Then, Pip goes to Ms. Havisham’s house and meets Orlick at the front gate. It seems that Orlick now works for Ms. Havisham. When Pip enters the room, he sees Ms. Havisham and a beautiful young lady he’s never seen. When Pip looks into her eyes, it turns out that the beautiful young lady is Estella. Pip thought that she looked much more beautiful than the last time he saw her. “But she was so much changed, was so much more beautiful, so much more womanly, in all things winning admiration had made such wonderful advance, that I seemed to have made none.” (Pg 235) On the other hand, Estella didn’t talk to Pip like she used to. However, she tells him that she is still the same cruel and mean girl. “I have no softness there, no – sympathy – sentiment – nonsense.” (Pg 237) I think Estella might have changed on the inside as well. I just think she doesn’t want to show it. It looks like she doesn’t really think of Pip as a common little boy anymore. I can’t wait to see if Estella turns into a whole new person.

    Reply
  19. Zoe

    In chapters 27-29, Pip meets many of his friends from his old home once again. His encounters with these people show a lot of change that had occurred since Pip had been gone. The first person Pip meets is Joe. When he comes, Joe tries to act all formal, but it doesn’t work after countless times of dropping his hat. This makes Pip embarrassed to have Joe around in front of Herbert. When Herbert leaves, Joe can be more himself. This is when you start to see the old relationship they used to have. Joe informs him of Ms.Havisham wanting Pip to come and meet Estella again for she had come home from school. Pip right away becomes excited about Estella and when Joe explains he will be gone for good now he doesn’t realize before it’s too late and he can’t say goodbye.

    After the good news about Estella, he immediately goes back home the next day. He decides to stay at the Blue Boar, go to Mrs.Havisham’s the first day, go to Joe’s the next day, and go home. When he goes to Mrs.Havisham’s house, he first meets Orlick. Orlick informs Pip that he was the new “security measures” at the gate and had a little room at the front for more protection because of the constant escaping convicts. When Pip gets to Mrs.Havisham’s room, he sees a girl he doesn’t recognize which he soon figures out is the new Estella. He is sent to the garden to walk around with her and she tells him that she has no heart. This reminds Pip of something but he can’t figure it out. Later at dinner, Mr.Jaggers doesn’t even look at Estella. This strange encounter was so inside Pip’s head, he didn’t even go back to Joe and went straight home.

    You can see that the relationships between the people he new at his old home had changed quite a bit. Pip has already forgotten about Joe and the family again and his budding love with Estella has changed quite a bit. At this point, after all the new twists and turns, there’s no telling what’s next.

    Reply
  20. trinityt

    In chapters 27-29, Pip have met various people from back home such as Joe, Miss Havisham, and Estella. The way he reacts and interacts with these people have change ever since he came to London.

    The first person that Pip was reunited with was Joe. When I read this part, I thought that Pip would be excited to see Joe again. However, his reaction was the opposite of excitement and happiness. Pip felt ashamed of Joe. He even said that if he could use money to keep Joe from visiting him, he would certainly use it. According to the text, “Not with pleasure…with considerable disturbance, some mortification, and a keen sense of incongruity. If I could kept him away by paying money, I certainly would have paid money.” (pg.218). It really hurts me to see Pip reacting this way about Joe.

    After his reunion with Joe, Pip went back to his town. There, he visited Miss Havisham, and Estella. Pip’s attitude towards them didn’t change very much. Just like before Pip went to London, Miss Havisham still wears her wedding dress, and her personality is still the same as ever. While Pip was talking with her in a room, Miss Havisham kept telling Pip to love Estella. The following quote describe the conversation between them. “‘Love her, love her, love her! If she favours you, love her. If she wounds you, love her. If she tears your heart to pieces- and as it gets older and stronger, it will tear deeper- love her, love her, love her!'” (pg.240). Miss Havisham also tells Pip what true love is, relating it to her painful past.
    Estella, who was abroad, now is back from France. Her personality is the same as before, but her appearance did, which have made an impact on Pip. “But she was so much changed, was so much more beautiful, so much more womanly, in all things winning admiration had made such wonderful advance, that I seemed to have made none.” (pg.235). As Estella becomes more beautiful, Pip admire her more.

    I’m excited to see how the relationship between Pip and Estella will play out. I’m also excited to see if there will be more moments between Pip and Biddy, especially how his feelings for Estella and Biddy will play out.

    Reply
  21. stephaniec

    In chapters 27-29 Pip regained contact with various characters from his life before fortune. Pip received a letter written by Biddy, in regards to Joe coming to visit Pip. Pip absolutely dreaded this situation. In fact, Pip stated “Not with pleasure, though I was bound to him by so many ties; no; with considerable disturbance, some mortification, and a keen sense of incongruity. If I could have kept him away by paying money, I certainly would have paid money.” (page 218). This statement proved how deeply Pip’s character had changed throughout the novel so far. In the beginning of the novel, Pip adored Joe, and loved to be with him. However, when Joe arrived Pip felt ashamed to be around him. Until Joe revealed the real reason he came to visit, Pip wanted nothing more than for him to leave. Joe came to London at the request of Ms. Havisham. She wanted Pip to come home and re acquaint himself with Estella.
    Pip decided to return home to see Estella. He was delighted to see her and was overwhelmed with her beauty. Pip said “I fancied, as I looked at her, that I slipped hopelessly back into the coarse and common boy again.” (page 235). Pip was falling in love with her all over again. He was over the moon ecstatic to be with Estella again, but soon felt guilty that he did not feel as excited about seeing Joe. Pip thought to himself, “It was but a day gone, and Joe had brought tears into my eyes; they had soon dried, God forgive me! soon dried.” (page 244). I think Pip’s relationships have changed after being in London and will continue to change and evolve for the rest of the novel.

    Reply
  22. Sunna

    In these chapters, Pip meets some people from his past. When Joe visits, Pip is rather rude to him. He acts superior and is ashamed of the man who was always there for him. He even says, “Let me confess exactly, with what feelings I looked forward to Joe’s coming. Not with pleasure, though I was bound to him by so many ties; no; with considerable disturbance, some mortification, and a keen sense of incongruity.” This is disappointing, because I loved Pip and Joe’s relationship before the money went to Pip’s head. In addition, Pip also meets Estella again. At first he doesn’t recognize her, but then he sees her eyes and knows who she is. She treats Pip better than she did last time, and Pip is clearly still in love with her. Estella has done nothing but abuse Pip both physically and emotionally, so unless she’s truly changed and become a better person, I hope that Pip eventually realizes that she isn’t a good person. I think that Pip will continue to push his old life away in favor for this new one.

    Reply
    1. josepha4

      I also think Pip is going in the wrong direction with the people he’s letting into his life, I hope he hasn’t gone to far yet and can still get some people back

      Reply
  23. josepha4

    Throughout the chapters, Pip has encounters with his old friends and loves. First, Pip receives a note from Biddy, explaining Joe, Pip’s old friend and caretaker would be visiting him to give him news. When Pip hears of this, he is not delighted to see an old friend but rather concerned Joe will be an embarrassment to himself and Pip. Before his “amazing transformation” into a gentleman, nothing about Joe would seem wrong to Pip, but Pip is now thinking that his past will drag him down and he will go to extremes not to reunite with his best friend, particularly to avoid looking bad in front of a person he doesn’t even respect, Drummel. Pip knows this is wrong of him, and suffers as he thinks about it. He even says,” Let me confess exactly, with what feelings I looked forward to Joe’s coming. Not with pleasure though I was bound to him by so many ties with considerable disturbance, some mortification, and a keen sense of incongruity. If I could have kept him away by paying money, I certainly would have paid money.” This a heart braking sentence that truly shows how much Pip wants distance and separation from the people who really care for him. Joe understands Pip’s feelings of shame and tells him that he will in fact no longer visit Pip because he doesn’t want to feel so out of place himself as well as make Pip feel uncomfortable. He helps Pip to understand that Pip won’t think him that bad if he just sees him in the forge where Joe belongs. This interaction between Joe and Pip also shows great heart in Joe for letting Pip go where he needs to be, and not attaching himself to Pip’s coattails as Pumblechook does. Next, Pip encounters Estella, the person who he loves, but who has always been toxic to him. I think if Pip was really evolving into a young man and learning about life, he would resist his love with Estella. His boyish feelings for, and his need to win her show that he still somewhere thinks the same way he did when he was a small boy with coarse hands and thick boots.” I verily believe that her not remembering and not minding in the least made me cry again, inwardly–and that is the sharpest crying of all”. Estella still makes Pip feel the same awful way he felt in her company before, except that she doesn’t even remember all the pain she caused Pip. Though she understands who she is, and that she is someone who has no heart. Hopefully one day, Pip will understand that he is letting in all the bad people in his life and pushing away the good people. It’s very disappointing to see Pip make such unintelligent choices and maybe he will one day understand that he is wrong.

    Reply
  24. Maddie

    In chapters 27-29, Pip meets up with a few people from his old home. First, Joe comes to visit Pip in London, and it was very awkward because Joe was treating Pip very differently. Joe was calling Pip “Sir” a lot, and Pip didn’t understand why. “’Us two being now alone, Sir,’ – began Joe. ‘Joe,’ I interrupted, pettishly, ‘how can you call me Sir?’” (pg. 222) Pip seems to think that Joe is acting very strange. I think it is strange how Joe is treating Pip so professionally, even though he basically raised Pip, and they were the best of friends.

    Pip goes home then, because he is informed that Estella is back at Miss Havisham’s house and wishes to see him. When Pip sees Estella, he sees a beautiful young lady. She too has changed quite a lot since they last saw each other. I wonder if Pip will go back to loving Estella, or if he will decide for good that she is not the one, and go back to his life as a gentleman in London?

    Reply
  25. janem

    During chapters 27, 28, and 29, Pip sees Joe, Miss Havisham, and Estella again. First, Joe comes to the city to see Pip. Joe is very “common”, meaning he doesn’t have fancy clothes or great manners. Because of this, Pip is embarrassed and ashamed of Joe. This shows Pip’s growth in becoming a gentleman. By learning and having nicer things, Pip really sees the contrast between how he was and how he is now. We as the readers can also remember how Pip loved Joe and was very close with him, and now he doesn’t want his reputation to be ruined by Joe’s awkwardness. It’s good that Pip is growing, but disappointing that he isn’t the sweet little boy he used to be. Next, Pip goes to Miss Havisham’s. Miss Havisham is very strange towards Pip, pulling him close and violently whispering for him to “love her”, referring to Estella. These words get stuck in Pip’s head through the night, saying he does love her but isn’t too convincing. He also sees Estella, all grown up and more beautiful than she ever was, and much different too. Pip says that she claims to not remember her cruel behavior towards him as a child. She is very proper now, and doesn’t mind walking with him. I think that Pip really wants to love Estella, but just doesn’t and can’t help that. He is probably still better suited for Biddy, since she didn’t used to haunt Pip like Estella did. Miss Havisham’s also says she raised Estella for someone to one day love her, but I wonder if maybe this is a plan to have revenge. Since the groom left Miss Havisham’s on her wedding day, maybe she will arrange a wedding for Estella but not let her attend. Maybe she wants Estella to break someone’s heart, much like her ex-groom did, and that’s why during Pip’s early visits to Miss Havisham she was chanting “break his heart”.

    Reply

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