September 21

“Well,” said Wemmick, “he’ll give you wine, and good wine. I’ll give you punch, and not bad punch….”

Read chapters 23-26 (or chaps 4-7 of Volume II) of Great Expectations.  Then, compare and contrast Pip’s experiences at Mr. and Mrs. Pocket’s, Mr. Wemmick’s and Mr. Jaggers’ homes.  How do these experiences contribute to Pip’s education in the ways of the world?

Be sure to use specific details from the text to support your opinions.

Be sure also that you respond to at least one other comment in this thread.

Don’t forget that you need to follow the rules of standard written English in all your writing for English class, even your short comments on the Great Expectations blog!

GE blog #8


Copyright © 2018. All rights reserved.

Posted September 21, 2018 by equinson in category Great Expectations

43 thoughts on ““Well,” said Wemmick, “he’ll give you wine, and good wine. I’ll give you punch, and not bad punch….”

  1. mylesn

    In these chapters Pip goes to 3 separate houses. Each of these houses are very different and have an effect on Pip. The Pocket’s household is a mess. Ms. Pocket refuses to take care of their many children and forces the older ones to do it. She believes that she belongs to a higher social class than she is and is not suited to be a parent. “‘Jane only interfered for the protection of the baby.’ ‘I will not allow anybody to interfere.'” The Wemmick house is a castle. It has a moat, a tower, and a drawbridge. “The bridge was a plank, and it crossed a chasm about four feet wide and two deep.” I believe this house is best fro Pip, because the last house he visits is Mr.Jagger’s house. “”My own doing,” said Wemmick. “’Looks pretty; don’t it?’ I highly commended it. I think it was the smallest house I ever saw; with the queerest gothic windows (by far the greater part of them sham), and a gothic door, almost too small to get in at.” Just like him the house is dark and gloomy. Overall I would want to stay in the castle with the Wemmick’s because a house with a woman who only cares about social class and a dark, gloomy one isn’t much competition.

    Reply
  2. Rcey Ortega

    Throughout chapters 23-26, Pip visits three different houses. First, he visits Mr. and Mrs. Pocket’s house. It has many kids that love playing. While they tumble and trip, their mother, Mrs. Pocket, relaxes and reads a book. Her maids are the only ones who take care of them. Also, the kids were tripping and tumbling because of Mrs. Pocket. “Why, if it ain’t your footstool! And if you keep it under your skirts like that, who’s to help tumbling!” (pg 188)
    In Mr. Wemmwick’s house there is an Aged. The Aged likes when you nod at him. The house looked like a castle with a gothic door and gothic windows. “I think it was the smallest house I ever saw; with the queerest gothic windows and a gothic door, almost to small to get in at.” (pg 206)
    In Pip’s guardian’s (Mr. Jaggers) house, Pip and his friends have dinner. The room was shady and had little light. During dinner, Mr. Jaggers keeps on talking about Drummle and Drummle doesn’t like it. “Who’s the spider?” “The spider?” said I. the blotchy, sprawly, sulky fellow.” “That’s Bentley Drummle,” I replied. (pg 212)
    I think each house was very different from each other. The house I probably liked the least was Mr. and Mrs Pockets house. Mrs. Pocket was very lazy and barely took care of her children. If she is not going to take care or spend time with them, why did she have kids? I would most likely stay with Mr. Wemmick because his castle is not filled with tumbling kids and it seems relaxing.

    Reply
    1. Mikayla Friedman

      I agree with your analysis about Mr. and Mrs. Pocket’s house. I think it is a bit weird that Mrs. Pocket doesn’t watch her children, do you? She just leaves everything up to the nurses and maids and the older children while she relaxes as if nothing is happening.

      Reply
      1. Emma Garbowitz

        I agree how it is odd how Mrs. Pocket pays no attention whatsoever to her children. She allows everyone else to do her job of being a mother while she lives in luxury and does whatever she wants as she pleases.

        Reply
  3. Mikayla Friedman

    In chapters 4 through 7 of the second volume of Great Expectations, Pip visits three very different households. First, he goes to Mr. and Mrs. Pocket’s house. Their home is a bit hectic, with kids running everywhere and nurses chasing after them. Mrs. Pocket doesn’t pay much attention to her kids. Pip was, “…made very uneasy in my mind by Mrs. Pocket’s falling into a discussion with Drummle respecting two baronetcies, while she ate a sliced orange steeped in sugar and wine, and forgetting all about the baby on her lap: who did most appalling things with the nutcrackers.” (page 193) In addition, I found it strange that Mrs. Pocket would reprimand Jane for taking the nutcracker out of the baby’s grip. Jane was only acting to protect the baby, and for some weird reason Mrs. Pocket didn’t approve of this.
    The next house that Pip goes to is Mr. Wemmick’s house, who is Mr. Jaggers’s clerk. My impression of Mr. Wemmick’s house was that it is very homy and nice. It is not fancy like Jaggers’s, but it is not crazy like the Pocket’s. Wemmick seems to take great pride in his home. The text states, “Wemmick’s house was a little wooden cottage in the midst of plots of garden, and the top of it was cut out and painted like a battery mounted with guns. ‘My own doing,’ said Wemmick. ‘Looks pretty; don’t it?’” (page 206) Mr. Wemmick also has a castle by his house, where is aged parent lives. Wemmick seems like a very nice man who will become fast friends with Pip. I’m looking forward to seeing how their relationship will continue to grow throughout the novel.
    The last house that Pip visits is his guardian’s house, Mr. Jaggers. Pip is accompanied by Herbert, Drummle, and Startop. His house is fancy but simple. The text states, “The furniture was all very solid and good, like his watch chain. It had an official look, however, and there was nothing merely ornamental to be seen.” (page 211) Mr. Jaggers takes an interest in Drummle, whom Pip doesn’t particularly like. Jaggers serves food that has an excellent quality, which shows off his wealth. In conclusion, Pip had varied experiences at each house, which will shape the way he sees these people (the Pockets, Mr. Wemmick, and Jaggers) in the future.

    Reply
    1. Zoe

      I agree that these dinners will shape the way he feels about these certain characters. I think that Pip might feel that he doesn’t trust Mr.Jaggers because he limes Drummle, but told Pip not to hang out with him. I also think that Mr.Wemmick will make Pip think of Joe because both Joe and Mr.Wemmick are very kind to Pip, but Pip might take more of a liking towards Mr.Wimmick because he has a better profession.

      Reply
    2. mirandak

      I totally agree with your opinion on Wemmick! He certainly seems like a wonderful character once Pip gets to know him, and hopefully Dickens will continue to develop their friendship throughout the novel!

      Reply
  4. Zoe

    In chapters 23-26 Pip went to dinner at a few different houses. The most memorable were Mr.Jaggers’ and Mr.Wimmick’s house. When Pip usually sees Mr.Wemmick, he has a stern look on his face and is very serious in the office. When you first meet him, he seems like a very scary person. However, when he invites Pip over for dinner, along the way, he starts to open up to Pip. He even talk about his boss, Mr.Jaggers, to him. His house is very strange, yet very lovable. On the outside, it looks like a small shack with gothic windows and doors and a bridge to get to the door over a small chasm. He also has animals in the back as well as a garden to grow his own vegetables. Inside, he has an old folk living with him and antiques littered around the house. Altogether, it’s very homely and much unlike the part of himself he shows at work. Pip and Mr.Wimmick really got along and had a wonderful time at dinner. He even openly talks to Pip about forgetting about home at work and leaving work at work when home. “No;the office is one thing, and private life is another. When I go into the office, I leave the castle behind me, and when I come into the Castle, I leave the Office behind me.”-pg208.

    However, two days later, Pip goes to Mr.Jaggers’ house for dinner. Instead of feeling comfortable, it seems like Mr.Jaggers never leaves work. He keeps his house very much like his office, and has a very strange housekeeper. The housekeeper, Molly, was asked to show her wrists during dinner, and nervously she revealed strange scars that went across them. This just added another mystery to the house. Along with Pip, three of his buddies joined him to dinner. They all had a wonderful meal, very fancy as well. Although, they all had a little too much to drink. Pip got into a fight with Drummle about borrowing and owing money and it became very awkward during dinner. It seemed as though Pip forgot this was in front of his Guardian. “Drummle, without any threat or warning, pulled his hands out of his pockets, dropped his round shoulders, swore, took up a large glass, and would have flung it at his adversary’s head, but for our entertainer’s dexterously seizing it at the instant when it was raised for that purpose.”-pg216. Later, Pip came to apologize for their behavior, and Mr.Jaggers said that he liked Drummle. However, he also said for Pip to spend as little time as possible around him. It was altogether a peculiar dinner and much different from the one at Mr.Wimmick’s house. It seemed like Mr.Wimmick was more of a friend to Pip and Mr.Jaggers had a lot of mysteries going around him. I definitely think there is something awfully strange about the difference between Mr.Jaggers’ house and Mr.Wimmick’s.

    Reply
    1. stephaniec

      I agree that the two houses are completely opposite of each other, which is very interesting for the reader and for Pip to experience.

      Reply
  5. Sunna

    Throughout these chapters, Pip visits three different houses. He first visits the Pocket’s. Their house is messy and full of children. However, Mrs. Pocket doesn’t seem to care about her children and has the maids and older children look after them. When Jane took the nutcracker out of the baby’s grip, Mrs. Pocket gets angry about it. This is very strange and I hope that it will be talked about more later, because why wouldn’t she want to keep her child safe? Pip also visits Mr. Wemmick’s house. He seemed to be very prideful of his home. He also has a castle where his elderly parents live. It has a drawbridge, a moat, and a tower. They both seemed to get along pretty well, so hopefully their relationship will grow. The last house that Pip visited was Mr. Jagger’s home. It seems a lot like his work, but is still very fancy. I thought that the strangest thing was when Mr. Jaggers asked his housekeeper, Molly, to show him her wrists. They had scars, and she seemed very nervous. I’m curious to see why this happens. All in all, I think that Mr. Wemmick’s house was the best one. He seems to get along best with Pip and his house isn’t extremely hectic. These houses are all very different, and I’m excited learn more about each of them, as well as their inhabitants.

    Reply
    1. trinityt

      I agree with your response. I also think that it was very strange that Mr. Jaggers asked Molly to show her wrists, but it became more strange that her wrists has scars on them. I think there’s more to Mr. Jaggers than what meets the eye.

      Reply
  6. trinityt

    In chapters 23-26, Pip visited three different houses.
    The first house that Pip visited belong to Mr. and Mrs.Pocket, which seems to be quite a mess. They have many children. The children kept tripping and tumbling, which was because of Mrs.Pocket. Not only that, but Mrs.Pocket doesn’t take care her kids. “I was made very uneasy in my mind by Mrs. Pocket’s falling into a discussion with Drummle respecting two baronetcies, while she ate a sliced orange steeped in sugar and wine, and forgetting all about the baby on her lap: who did most appalling things with the nut-crackers.” (pg.193). Mrs. Pocket was talking with Drummel while eating an orange slice, forgetting that there’s a baby on her lap, who is using a nut-cracker not in a very safe way. This shows that Mrs. Pocket is not very responsible and is not a good parent.
    The second place that Pip visited was Mr. Wemmick’s house. His house has a gothic door, and gothic windows. “…with the queerest gothic windows (by far the queerest part of them sham) and a gothic door…” (pg.206). There are also animals in the back of the house with cucumbers. “At the back, there’s a pig, and there are fowls and rabbits; then, I knock together my own little frame, you see, and grow cucumbers…” (pg.207). In addition, there is an Aged whom Mr.Wemmick refers to as “aged parent”, and the Aged likes it when you nod at him. Mr.Wemmick’s house has a peaceful vibe to it.
    The third place that Pip visited was Mr.Jaggers’s house. Mr.Jaggers’s house seems old on the outside, and inside has books relating to his work along with his work itself that he sometimes brought home. “There was a bookcase in the room; I saw, from the backs of the books, that they were about evidence, criminal law, criminal bio-graphy, trials, acts of parliament, and such things…In a corner, was a little table of papers with a shaded lamp: so that he seemed to bring the office home with him…” (pg.211). There was also a housekeeper that Pip describe her as “the faces I had seen rise out of the Witches’ caldron” (pg.212). Mr.Jaggers’s house gives off the vibe of a big house, but has little use with an empty feeling.
    These experiences contribute to Pip’s education in the ways of the world. Two themes came to my mind. One is money isn’t everything. The other one is don’t judge a book by its cover. It’s true that Mr. and Mrs. Pocket, Mr. Wemmick, and Mr. Jaggers all have money, big or small, but they don’t seem to be on the same level of social status. However, that doesn’t defy what their personal life is like. At first, Mr. and Mrs. Pocket’s family may seems perfect and all. Unfortunately, it was quite a mess within their family. As for Mr. Jaggers, his house may appear big and all, but it seems that work and money is his center of life. Compare to all of these two houses that Pip has visited, Mr. Wemmick seems to be the good one. Mr. Wemmick’s house gives off a peaceful vibe, and as for his job and social status, it may not be the best as Mr. Jaggers or others, but his personal life seems to be the most peaceful out of the three. Plus, his job isn’t bad as well. So I think Mr. Wemmick is the best one out of all these.

    Reply
  7. stephaniec

    Throughout chapters 23-26, Pip visited three very different houses. In the beginning of chapter 23, Pip spent his time at Mr. and Mrs. Pocket’s house. As soon as Pip arrived, it was evident of how hectic and rowdy their home was. There was a lot of undisciplined kids, who were only taken care of by the nurses, because Mrs. Pocket had not the slightest incline to take care of them herself. During his time at their house, Pip took note of Mrs. Pocket paying no attention to the baby on her lap “…made very uneasy in my mind by Mrs. Pocket’s falling into a discussion with Drummle respecting two baronetcies, while she ate a sliced orange steeped in sugar and wine, and forgetting all about the baby on her lap: who did most appalling things with the nutcrackers.” (page 193). In addition, there were many people in the house causing this experience to be a bit overwhelming for Pip. Although, Pip met two compelling characters: Drummle and Startop. Drummle seemed to keep to himself, while Startop had a “woman’s delicacy”. It became clear that Pip showed more of a liking to Startop than Drummle. In fact, Pip got in a quarrel with Drummle in another house Pip visited.
    After Mr. and Mrs. Pocket’s house, Pip visited Mr. Wemmick’s house. Mr. Wemmick’s house gave Pip a cozy and welcoming feeling. Likewise, Pip felt got the same feeling with Mr. Wemmick, for they seemed to have a strong connection. Pip described his house by saying “Wemmick’s house was a little wooden cottage in the midst of plots of garden, and the top of it was cut out and painted like a battery mounted with guns.” (page 206). When Pip and Mr. Wemmick go inside, they have a grand time together and seemed to have gotten along perfectly. He told Pip how he intended to keep his work life and home life separate and that is why there was no sign of work at his house and why he acted differently at work. However, the next house Pip visited, seemed to have a lot of more of the work life present.
    Finally, Pip went to Mr. Jagger’s house (his guardian). This house was quite the opposite of Mr. Wemmick’s household. When Pip first entered his house, along with his two friends and Drummle, he went through an unwelcoming stone hall. Then, he arrived at a dark staircase that led to three brown rooms. Mr. Jagger’s seemed to have brought work home with him, because there was a bookcase filled with books about criminal law and there was a table with a lot of papers and a lamp. I think Pip described Mr. Jagger’s house best, when he said “The furniture was all very solid and good, like his watch-chain. It had an official look, however, and there was nothing merely ornamental to be seen.” (page 211). Overall, I think all the houses had their own distinct features causing the houses to differ from one another.

    Reply
    1. hannahm4

      I agree that each house is very distinct from one another, but also that Mr.wemmicks house was the most comforting and welcoming home out of all three

      Reply
  8. hannahm4

    Pip visits three different houses throughout chapters 23-26. The first house he visits is Mrs and Mr Pockets house. Their house had many children roaming around and it’s very messy. Mrs.Pocket doesn’t care for her children because she leaves them for her maid to take care of. When the maid takes the nutcracker out of the baby’s hand, Mrs.Pocket seemed to be mad at her for doing that which is very strange, Wouldn’t you want to keep your child safe?! The next house Pip visits is Mr.Wemmicks house. Mr.Wemmicks house was strange. It had a gothic door and a gothic window. For instance, “…with the queerest gothic windows(by far the queerest part of them sham) and a gothic door…”(pg 206) There were many animals in the back of Mr.Wemmick’s house. Also, cucumbers were being grown in the back, with thew animals. Pip also sees and aged woman who he refers to as an “aged parent”. Apart from the strange, gothic features of this house Pip felt comforted by his home and had a strong connection. The last house Pip visited was Mr.Jaggers house. Mr.Jaggers house is similar to his work, but is still pretty fancy. I thought that when Mr.Jaggers told his house keeper to show him her wrist was very strange. When she shows him there are scars on her wrists. I am curious as to why he wanted her to show him. Overall I think Mr.Wemmicks house was the best because it comforted Pip the most and also Pip and Mr.Wemmick had a very good, strong connection. I am very curious as to see what will happen next!

    Reply
  9. Maddie

    The first house Pip visits is Mr. and Mrs. Pocket’s house. When he arrives to The Pocket’s house, he sees lots of children running around and playing. Pip says, “I saw that Mr. and Mrs. Pocket’s children were not growing up or being brought up, but were tumbling up.” Mrs. Pocket was sitting on a garden chair reading a book, and Flopson and Millers, the nursemaids, were supervising the children. When Mrs Pocket takes Pip inside the house and shows him to his room, it is described as “A pleasant one, and so furnished as that I could use it with comfort for my own private sitting-room.”
    The next house Pip visits is Mr. Wemmick’s house. He says it is the smallest house he’d ever seen, with gothic windows and a gothic door, and there was a flagpole that Wemmick raised the flag on every Sunday. There was also a small drawbridge at the front of the house that Mr. Wemmick was very proud to show Pip. In Wemmick’s yard, there was “a pig, and there are fowls and rabbits.” He also grows cucumbers to make salad. In the “castle” there is an old man who Wemmick calls his “aged parent.” He is deaf and sits by the fire, and is cared for by Mr. Wemmick.
    The final house that Pip visits is Mr. Jaggers’ house. When they arrive, Pip describes it as “Rather a stately house of its kind, but dolefully in want of painting, and with dirty windows. They went inside, and Mr. Jaggers showed them his dressing room and his bedroom. They then went on to have dinner, which was a large feast consisting of whatever food they wanted. These three houses showed Pip the different types of lifestyles that people had, and greatly educated him with knowledge of Mr. Pocket, Mr. Wemmick, and Mr. Jaggers’ home lives, and how they differ from one another.

    Reply
  10. janem

    During chapters 23-26 of “Great Expectations” by Charles Dickens, Pip visits three different households. He first visits and dines with Mr. and Mrs. Pocket. Here he observes Mr. Pocket constantly trying to pull himself up by his hair, and Mrs. Pocket snapping at Jane for trying to help her keep the baby safe. Dinner with the Pockets reminded me of Pip’s house when he was younger, both Joe and Mr. Pocket stood aside while the wives, Mrs. Joe and Mrs. Pocket, snapped at their innocent children. Next, Pip dined with Mr. Wemmick. He first brought Pip to a place called the Castle, where an old, very hard of hearing man lived. I thought it was very intriguing to see the personal side of Mr. Wemmick, he is so firm and kept to himself at work, while at his home he was very chatty and open with Pip. Lastly, Pip went and ate with Mr. Jaggers. While talking with Mr. Jaggers, Pip felt taken off guard when he refers to Drummel, Star Top, and Herbert as Pip’s gang. Pip barely knows Star Top and Drummel and doesn’t feel like he has a connection with them whatsoever. At dinner, while everyone is tipsy, Pip gets into a fight with Drummel about Drummel easily taking a loan but not wanting to give one. Some time after the dinner, Drummel leaves the Pocket’s house. Maybe this has to do with his greed. He was so stubborn about lending other’s money, he might have ended up with a conflict, forcing him to leave where he was staying.

    Although the quality of the food was the same at each meal, the three households contrast tremendously. First, Mrs. Pocket was raised to think she was made to be a princess and had to marry a title, but ended up with Mr. Pocket. Because of this, she pities herself for not marrying the best, and is very snobbish and useless. On the other hand, Mr. Jaggers ate informally, with no accessories and everything was distributed by him, even though he could have easily had his servant hand everything out to his guests and could have dressed up the table. This shows the reader that a social class won’t define how good of a person you are, and that your personality and actions can’t be altered by the luxuries that may or may not surround you.

    Reply
    1. Brishti Sarkar

      I agree with your point. Before, Pip thought that all rich people must act and live the same. Now, he is proven wrong.

      Reply
  11. Brishti Sarkar

    In chapters 23-26, Pip visits three very different houses. The first house he visits is Mr and Mrs. Pocket’s. Their house seems to always be in a mess, and Mrs. Pocket refuses to care for their many children. In response to one of their children, Jane, taking a nutcracker away from the baby, Mr. Pocket remarks, “How could you be so unreasonable? Jane only interfered for the protection of the baby.”(p.194). The next house he visits is Mr. Wemmick’s. His house, as Pip describes it, was “the smallest house [he] had ever saw; with the queerest gothic windows… and a gothic door.”(p.206). At the “Castle,” Mr. Wemmick’s parents live. Pip felt the most at ease at this house. The final house that Pip visits is Mr. Jaggers’s. His house is described as “rather a stately house of its kind, but dolefully in want of painting, and with dirty windows.”(p.211). In it, Pip, Herbert, Drummle, and Startop dined, and at one point, Mr. Jaggers grabs his servant, Molly, by the arm, and shows everyone the scars on her arm. This makes her very uncomfortable, and the mood stretches to Pip as well. Overall, these experiences contribute to Pip’s education in the ways of the world because they show how a variety of people can be found in a small area, and how no one lives the same as another.

    Reply
  12. Emma Garbowitz

    Throughout chapters 23-26 of Great Expectations Pip visits three very different houses with three very different people in them. The first house Pip sees is Mr and Mrs. Pocket’s house. Their home is chaos because their kids are running everywhere. This doesn’t seem to matter to anyone and this is very irresponsible of their parents to allow them to do this. Also, while the family is at dinner Pip observes that Mrs. Pocket seems to pay no attention to her kids and it is almost as if she doesn’t know how to care for them as well. The text states, I was made very uneasy in my mind by Mrs. Pocket’s falling into a discussion with Drummle respecting two baronetcies, while she ate a sliced orange steeped in sugar and wine, and forgetting all about the baby on her lap: who did most appalling things with the nutcrackers.” This shows how little Mrs. Pocket pays attention to her kids. She has so many people working around her house like chefs, two caretakers for the children and other servants with numerous jobs that she can’t even tame care of her own kids. As well as this, it really appalled me how Mrs. Pocket reprimanded Jane for protecting her younger sibling when she couldn’t do it herself since she didn’t realize that a nutcracker was unsafe for her child to be playing with.
    The next house Pip goes to is Mr. Wemmick’s house. The first impression given of Mr. Wemmick’s home is very cozy and comfortable. Mr Wemmick seems to take much pride of his house because it seems as though he did everything to tune it up and make it as perfect as possible for himself and the Aged. The text states, ” I am my own engineer, and my own carpenter, and my own plumber, and my own gardener, and my own Jack of all trades.” This shows how Mr. Wemmick did everything on his own to make this house as best as possible to be his home.
    The final house Pip visited in these chapters is Mr. Jaggers’s house. His house is dark and very sophisticated looking. Everything is a similar color, is simple and is in order. It is fancy, neat and even has an office like area for him to do his work. The text states, “The furniture was all very solid and good, like his watch chain. It had an official look, however, and there was nothing merely ornamental to be seen.”This shows what Mr. Jaggers’s house is like on the inside. Furthermore, Mr. Jaggers has a housekeeper named Molly and he has a chef. Pip was accompanied by Herbert, Drummle, and Startop. For dinner, Mr. Jaggers serves a dish of excellent quality which just shows how rich he is.
    Although, Mr. Jaggers has a fancy, simple, elegant house, Mr. Wemmicks house is more appealing to me. This is because his house is more of a home. It is more comfortable and cozy while Mr. Jaggers’s house is dark and dreary and almost lonely. Therefore, all three houses that were visited by Pip in these chapters had a very different feel to each and every one of them.

    Reply
  13. jaclynl

    In these chapters, Pip visits three houses, Mr. Pocket’s, Mr. Wemmick’s, and Mr. Jaggers’s. All of these houses are very different in so many ways. First off, Mr. Pocket’s house is full of children. It is extremely hectic and overall quite a mess. Mrs. Pocket doesn’t even take care of her kids and has the maid do it instead. Jane takes a nutcracker out of the baby’s hands and Mrs. Pocket gets angry about it. I find that really strange because to me, that seems like the right thing to do.

    Next, Pip went to Mr. Wemmick’s home, which has a drawbridge that crosses a chasm. Pip seems to have a very good time there. It was interesting to see how different Mr. Wemmick acted at home versus when we first met him. We got to see a side of him that is more friendly and easier to talk to.

    The last home was Mr. Jaggers home which is very different than the other two. “The furniture was all very solid and good, like his watch-chain. It had an official look, however, and there was nothing merely ornamental to be seen.” (pg 211). There is a strange housekeeper named Molly who seems to have scars all over her arms which is weird. Pip also ends up getting into an argument with Drummle there, but they end up resolving it and Pip apologizes. I think that these three different houses were all very different and helped me get a better understanding of each character who lived there. I’m very excited to read more and see what else happens with these three characters.

    Reply
  14. Casey

    Throughout the chapters, Pip goes to three houses for dinner. First, he visits Mr. and Mrs. Pocket’s house. He walks into total chaos and sees children running around and misbehaving. It seems like they don’t even care about their children, as they are cared for by the nurses and maids. Next, he visits Mr. Wemmick. Pip describes this house as a castle. Last, he visited Mr. Jaggers’s house. Mr. Jaggers’s house is run down but he doesn’t seem to mind. The three houses are very different from one another and I’m curious to see how being in each house affects Pip.

    Reply
  15. josepha4

    Pip visits contrasting homes throughout the chapters. First, he sees Mrs. and Mr. Pocket’s house. It is dysfunctional and the parents of the children are living in a world of hypotheticals. Mr. Pocket lost his chance of a career in law or clergy for Mrs. Pocket. Meanwhile, she believes that she should not have to work because of her father’s almost being a Barronette, a title which he never actually received. Their house is filled with “maids and caregivers” that actually act like parents and masters and mistresses of the house. One of the children acts like a parent to her baby sibling. Both Mr. and Mrs. Pocket had such a noticeable air of being in somebody else’s hands, that I wondered who was really in possession of the house and let them live there, until I found this un-known power to be the servants.”

    Next, we visit Mr. Wemmick’s house, which is very different from the Pocket’s household. Rather than being cared for in his own home, Mr. Wemmick is the person who is caring for another, his father. Mr. Wemmick has a loving relationship with his father, he makes sure that he hears the boom from the cannon at the appropriate time and that he has a life as close to luxurious as possible. Mr. Wemmick’s family is different from the Pockets who demonstrate little true love.

    Perhaps most remarkable about Mr. Wemmick’s way of living is that he totally separates his work life from his home life. Wemmick displays this in his own face. For example, Wemmick is decribed as having a face like a postoffice box, which actually softens as he get home. Then, as he leaves, by degrees, “Wemmcik got dryer and harder as we went along, and his mouth tightened into a post-office again.” One last observation is that Mr. Wemmick has secluded his home and refuge from the rest of the world in an effort, I believe, to try and separate his true self from his work life. This is most obvious by the actual mote he has around his house and the drawbridge he draws up at the end of the day.

    The final house Pip visits is that of his guardian Mr.Jaggers. In contrast to Wemmick’s retreat, Jaggers’ house is much like his office. Whereas in Wemmick’s house there are lots of interesting items to look at, everything in Jaggers’ is just enough to keep everything functioning, nothing in it just for the soul purpose of being pretty. The look of it was old and gloomy. The paint was peeling the windows were dirty and things were gothic such as his windows and doors. Also, in contrast with Mr. Wemmick, he brings his work life home with him, as seen by his bookcase. No one helps him except for his maid. Nothing has a home feeling to it, “the furniture was all very solid and good… it had an official look… and there was nothing purely ornamental to be seen… he seemed to bring the office home with him.” All of these different perspectives of how life should be lived are in a way beneficial to Pip in the sense of helping him learn how different “gentleman” function. However, in my opinion all of these are extreme, and to some degree unacceptable. The Pocket’s know nothing when it comes to self or other care. Mr. Wemmick separates what he does in work life that is ugly from his warm and loving personal life. and Mr. Jaggers’ work life is his home life. He treats his help at home the way he treats his clients, cruel and powerful. Hopefully Pip, who is learning to be a gentleman, will choose to balance his life appropriately. I’m not sure there is a good example in any of these homes or characters that will turn him into a good young gentleman.

    Reply
  16. mirandak

    For the duration of Chapters 23-26, we pursue Pip’s journey throughout London as he meets numerous different people and visits several new places, having interesting and significant experiences all the while.
    Firstly, we see Pip as he goes to the Pocket residence, which I personally found chaotic and utterly confusing. It was the epitome of disarray, as the house was essentially run by the servants, Flopson and Millers (they “wore the pants” in the household), scurrying after the young children while Mr. Pocket worked and Mrs. Pocket did nothing. After Pip had stayed with them for quite a while, Mrs. Pocket’s character had really come to agitate me. Why didn’t she look after her own children? Did she think she was above the notion of caring for them because her father was “supposed” to be a baron, and so she considers herself nobility? Also, later on, when she at least finally took the baby onto her lap, she still came to ignore it, and the baby began playing in a way that could give itself an injury, which even made Pip quite uncomfortable. For instance, this is shown when in the text it states, “I was made very uneasy in my mind by Mrs. Pocket’s falling into a discussion with Drummle respecting two baronetcies, while she ate a sliced orange steeped in sugar and wine, and forgetting all about the baby on her lap: who did most appalling things with the nutcrackers.” (p.193) Soon, another of the children, a young girl named Jane, tried to interfere on behalf of the baby’s safety. However, rather than displaying gratuity towards her daughter for looking out for her sibling, Mrs. Pocket proceeded to scold her, infuriating me even more, and leading me to have even more questions. Why would she reprimand her daughter for worrying of the safety of the baby? Was she too proud to admit her own wrongdoings, and that Jane only had to step in at the fault of her mother? Either way, this theme of “superiority and nobility” of Mrs. Pocket seemed to show up quite often throughout Pip’s time there, and thus making the experience even more awkward and disordered.
    Next, we follow Pip’s visit to Mr. Wemmick’s home, which I found the most interesting. Fundamentally, when Pip first encounters Mr. Wemmick, he is in the midst of working as Mr. Jaggers’s clerk. At his job, Pip describes him as serious and “dry,” but behind closed doors, everything changes. Basically, as Pip began to talk to Mr. Wemmick more and more, starting to develop a friendship, he suddenly opened up! I found him to be quite kind, caring, hard-working, and especially cordial towards Pip! I did find it a bit strange that he acted as if he were two different people in his personal life and his work life. Perhaps this is a nudge from Dickens to say that home and work life should be distinctly separated! Either way, when they arrived at his house, or Walworth, it is basically a quaint cottage designed to have the appearance or feel of a castle (Maybe another nudge from Dickens towards the saying, “A man’s home is his castle). Furthermore, when Wemmick talked of his house, it made me admire his character even more so, as even though it wasn’t of the utmost luxury, he still took such pride and happiness in his feat of establishing this house. For instance, in the text it states, “Wemmick’s house was a little wooden cottage in the midst of plots of garden, and the top of it was cut out and painted like a battery mounted with guns.
    ‘My own doing,” said Wemmick. “Looks pretty; don’t it?’…
    ‘That’s a real flagstaff, you see,’ said Wemmick, ‘and on Sundays I run up a real flag. Then look here. After I have crossed this bridge, I hoist it up – so – and cut off the communication.’
    The bridge was a plank, and it crossed a chasm about four feet wide and two deep. But it was very pleasant to see the pride with which he hoisted it up and made it fast; smiling as he did so, with a relish and not merely mechanically.” (p.206). This showed me just a genuine and wonderful Wemmick’s character really is, even though his personality was masked by his occupation before. Soon, he introduced Pip to the Aged/Aged Parent (Wemmick’s father), they ate supper, Pip spent the night, ate breakfast, and then they made their way back to Little Britain. On the way there, Wemmick started to “change back” to his work persona I guess you could say, and shrivels back into the “dry” clerk of Mr. Jaggers.
    Lastly, Pip visits Mr. Jaggers’s home, and with him, Herbert, Startop and Drummle. I found Mr. Jaggers house to emit a serious and gloomy aura, just like that of Mr. Jaggers himself. In his house, Pip had dinner with the other four men, and we learn more about some of the characters. For instance, Drummle is quite sulky and impolite, while Startop is a bright and cheery young man, but somehow, Mr. Jaggers still ends up gravitating and being more interested by Drummle. Eventually, after a few dinner conversations and arguments, the visit took an even weirder turn when Mr. Jaggers demanded that his housekeeper, Molly, reveal her wrists, deeply scarred, when she was ever so clearly uncomfortable in the situation. For instance, this is shown when in the text it states, “‘If you talk of strength,’ said Mr. Jaggers, ‘I’ll show you a wrist. Molly, let them see your wrist.
    Her entrapped hand was on the table, but she had already put her other hand behind her waist. ‘Master,’ she said, in a low voice, with her eyes attentively and entreatingly fixed upon him. ‘Don’t.’
    ‘I’ll show you a wrist,’ repeated Mr. Jaggers, with an immovable determination to show it. ‘Molly, let them see your wrist.’
    ‘Master,’ she again murmured. ‘Please!’
    ‘Molly,’ said Mr. Jaggers, not looking at her, but obstinately looking at the opposite side of the room, ‘let them see both your wrists. Show them. Come!’
    He took his hand from hers, and turned that wrist up on the table. She brought her other hand from behind her, and held the two out side by side. The last wrist was much disfigured – deeply scarred and scarred across and across. When she held her hands out, she took her eyes from Mr. Jaggers, and turned them watchfully on every one of the rest of us in succession.” (p.214). At this time, I felt such pity for Molly, because she was so evidently apprehensive and hesitant, but was forced into it by her master anyway. This led me to have even more questions! Why would Dickens include this scene in the novel? Also, she always seems really nervous around him, so is she scared of him? Is Mr. Jaggers hiding something? Hopefully, all will be revealed later on in the novel.
    Significantly, while all of these experiences were so different from one another, I believe they will all help to further Pip’s education. Basically, by seeing all of these new places and conversing with multiple different people, he will begin to familiarize himself with how the world works, what different places in society are like, and how people act. Then, he will maybe grow more accustomed to this way of living over time!

    Reply
  17. Emily

    In these chapters Pip visits three houses. Mr. Pockets house, Mr. Wemmicks house, and Mr. Jaggers house. The first house he goes to is Mr. Pockets. Mr. Pocket has a lot of children and as a result his house is always a little chaotic. Strangely, Mrs. Pocket does not take care of her many children; she has maids do it. I don’t think that she knows how to take care of children because at one point one of her daughters took a nutcracker out of the hands of a baby. Ms. Pocket then said “You naughty child, how dare you? Go and sit down this instant!”. The nutcracker was a danger to the baby, and she did the right thing by taking it away, but she still got yelled at.
    The next house that Pip went to was Mr. Wemmick’s house. This was a very peculiar house because it seemed to be designed so it looked like a tiny castle. On page 206 Pip thinks, “it was the smallest house I had ever seen with the queerest gothic windows and a gothic door, almost too small to get in at…The bridge was a plank, and it crossed a chasm about four feet wide and two deep.” Although it is only the size of a small cottage, the house looks like someone shrunk a castle.
    As for Mr. Wemmick himself, his personality seemed to change once he got home. Once he is home he seems more pleasant. It is almost like he hides his actual personality from his work, so that once he gets home he can disapear into his castle and leave all of the stress behind.
    In contrast, Mr. Jaggers is exactly the same at home as he is at work. The outside was “dolefully in want of painting” and the inside was just like work. Pip thinks to himself, “The furniture was all very solid and good, like his watch-chain. It had an official look, however, and there was nothing merely ornamental to be seen.. Pip did not enjoy his visit very much because it felt like he was not very welcome. It was very strange and at one point Pip was introduced to a very odd maid named Molly who at one point was forced to show Pip and the other three guests, her wrists. They had strange scars, but there was no explanation for them. I wonder if that is a mystery that will be solved at a later time in the book.

    Reply
  18. maxwellw

    In chapters 23 26, Pip continues to get to know his fellow students and the Pockets, attending dinners at both Wemmick’s and Jaggers’s. Wemmick’s house appears to be like something out of a dream, an absurd “castle” in Walworth that he shares with his “Aged Parent.” Pip observes that Wemmick seems to have a new personality when he enters his home. While he is cynical and dry at work, at home he seems jovial and merry. By contrast, Jaggers’s house is oppressive and dark, shared only with a gloomy housekeeper, Molly. Pip’s fellow students attend the dinner at Jaggers’s with Pip, and Pip and Drummle quarrel over a loan Drummle borrowed from Startop. Jaggers warns Pip to stay away from Drummle, though the lawyer claims to like the disagreeable young man himself.

    Reply
  19. angelicac1

    Throughout chapters 23-26 of “Great Expectations” written by Charles Dickens, Pip visits three houses that are unalike in a variety of ways. The first home Pip visited was Mr. and Mrs. Pocket’s chaotic house. Mr. Pocket and Mrs. Pocket didn’t bother to stop their many children from racing around the house, which was not responsible of them. Mrs. Pocket even paid no attention to her baby that sat on her lap. Pip paid attention to Mrs. Pocket and was made very uneasy in his mind “…by Mrs. Pocket’s falling into a discussion with Drummle respecting two baronetcies, while she ate a sliced orange steeped in sugar and wine, and forgetting all about the baby on her lap: who did most appalling things with the nutcrackers.” (pg.193)
    The next house that was visited was Mr. Wemmick’s house. His home is a cottage that had the appearance of a castle. Mr. Wemmick took much pride in establishing his cottage although it wasn’t the most luxurious home. He says, ”I am my own engineer, and my own carpenter, and my own plumber, and my own gardener, and my own Jack of all trades.”
    The last house Pip visited was Mr. Jagger’s home. His house was dark and it looked very sophisticated. The interior was gloomy and very old looking. The windows were dirty, the paint was peeling off the walls, and his doors and windows were gothic looking.

    The look of it was old and gloomy. The paint was peeling the windows were dirty and things were gothic such as his windows and doors.

    Reply
  20. Sophie

    Throughout chapters 23-26, Pip visits three new houses and families for dinner, and gets to experience many different ways of lifestyle. First off, he goes to the house of Mr and Mrs Pocket. What he sees there, is a very strange sight. Mrs Pocket had lots of little children, 4 girls, 2 boys, and a little baby. At first, I was under the impression that Mrs Pocket loved being around children, and therefore was a caring, nurturing, loving mother. Unfortunately, she is the complete opposite. It seemed as if she didn’t even care about them. She had nothing to do with the parenting, and had no concern for their safety what-so-ever. For example, Jane, the child who seemed to be the most mature and has taken leadership within the siblings, was witnessing her baby brother play with nutcrackers at the dinner table. Obviously this wasn’t safe, so she got up and took the nutcrackers from the babies hands, saving any accidents that could’ve happened. This was a very kind gesture by Jane, but sadly, instead of appreciating her daughters obsessiveness or even commending her for looking out for her brother, Mrs Pocket lashed out and got mad at Jane! “You naughty child, how dare you? Go sit down this instant!” (Pg 194). This was definitely one of the major conflicts Pip had to observe. The second house Pip went to was Mr Wemmicks house. Mr Wemmick definitely sounds like a very proud man. One of the first things he says to Pip when he arrives was how much of the work he puts into his own house, such as pluming and carpentering. Which essentially would make sense, because he did indeed have a very nice homey relaxed feeling to his house. Thirdly, Pip visits Mr Jagger. This last house was more an experience of personality exposure, rather than possession. It was clear to Pip, that there are two sides to Mr Jagger, (work personality, and out of work personality). Watching each side evolve, and hearing how is changed everything about him, was really something Pip never saw before, and may have benefited his education in the sense of being mature and responsible at work, but still being able to relax and enjoy life. I am eager to keep reading and hear about what kind of result these houses had on Pip.

    Reply
  21. MadiR

    In chapters twenty-three through twenty-six Pip has different experiences at three different houses. Mr. and Mrs. Pocket’s, Mr. Wemmick’s, and Mr. Jaggers’ homes all have different appearances and people in them. Mr.and Mrs. Pocket’s home has a lot of kids running around and two maids who work tremendously hard watching them because Mrs. Pocket does not care for them. Mr. Wemmick’s house is extremely different from the Pocket’s. His house has a gothic door and gothic windows. Mr. Wemmick also has an old man who lives with him who is deaf. Pip has a meal thats alright and dessert that is also. Mr. Wemmick has a nice garden and many animals as well. Finally, Pip goes to eat a Mr Jaggers house. “There was a bookcase in the room; I saw, from the backs of the books, that they were about evidence, criminal law, criminal biography, trials, acts of parliament, and such things. The furniture was all very solid and good, like his watch-chain. It had an official look, however, and there was nothing merely ornamental to be seen. In a corner, was a little table of papers with a shaded lamp: so he seemed to bring the office home with him in that respect too, and to wheel it out of an evening and fall to work.”(page 211) Mr. Jaggers also has a maid who he embarrassed when he showed the company her wrists. All three houses have many similarities and differences. I think Pip is comforted the most in Mr. Wemmick’s house. Even though it is a little odd Pip enjoys his night with Mr. Wemmick.

    Reply
  22. Kate Ma.

    The three houses had their similarities and differences but what I noticed was how each person who lived/stayed at the house was treated differently. For example, at the Pockets house, all of the children were treated different then the old man at Wemmick’s and the Housemaid at Mr. Jaggers. On page, 193, it says, “while she ate a sliced orange steeped in sugar and wine, and forgetting all about the baby on her lap:who did appalling things with the nutcrackers.” This goes to show how Mrs. Pocket does not take great care of her kids, as they continuously are put in danger right in front of her. Mrs. Pocket then will yell at anyone who interferes with her parenting skills whether it be the maid, her husband and her daughter even though they are just trying to help. At Wemmicks small cottage, he housed a very old man that I believe to be his father. This man is treated with respect and is living happily thanks to Wemmick, although he can’t hear. For instance, the book says, “There, we found, sitting by the fire, a very old man in a flannel coat: clean, cheerful, comfortable and well cared for, but intensely deaf.” As you can see, Wemmick treats his people extremely well and truly makes him feel happy all the time, unlike Mrs. Pocket who doesn’t know how to be a mother. Next, Pip experienced Mr. Jaggers home. In my opinion, Jaggers strikes me as a mysterious guy, and his house is even more weird. Jaggers has many servants and maids but one played an important role in these chapters. On page 214, Pip narrates, “Master, she again murmured, Please!…She brought her other hand from behind her, and held the two out side by side. The last wrist was much disfigured- deeply seamed and scarred across to across.” I’m not completely sure what exactly happened to wrists, but I can see that Jaggers disrespected her and forced her to reveal her wrists when she obviouly begged him not too. I got a vibe that Jaggers treats his servants poorly, just like Mrs. Pocket treats her family. I think a persons house can reveal a lot about their character and so far all three of these peoples houses, match up with their character.

    Reply
  23. Laila Sayegh

    In chapters twenty-three to twenty-six of Great Expectations, Pip visits three different homes. He visits Mr. and Mrs. Pocket’s home, Mr. Wemmick’s home and Mr. Jaggers’ home. In the Pocket household, we see the Pockets have many children. Their home is run by maids. Mr. and Mrs. Pocket are constantly bickering and Pip has to witness it. When Mrs. Pocket sees her daughter Jane take a nutcracker out of her baby siblings hand, she freaks out. Clearly, Mrs. Pocket’s personality is very out of control. Things are very different in the Wemmick household. Mr. Wemmick has a very small quiet home and things are clearly more relaxed in his home. Pip has dinner in Mr. Wemmick’s home. Lastly, Pip visits Mr. Jaggers. Mr. Jaggers lives in a big home. Pip is shocked to see that Mr. Jagger has another side of him. A home side. During work, he is a serious businessman but now he is different. Overall, Pip seemed to have three very different experiences in each home.

    Reply
  24. johnh1

    Pip goes into the Pocket’s house, Mr. Jaggers’ home, and Wemmick’s house. First he goes to the Pocket’s house he sees how sloppy it is. the maids do no work and Ms. Jaggers is vain and doesn’t think she should have to do work because of her Father. Wemmick’s house is a little cottage and isn’t that bad without much of note. It is nice and small but not bad. Then he goes to Mr. Jaggers’ home. It is a very large house. It has good furniture even if it is a bit gloomy. All of these houses show a bit about the characters. The Pocket’s house is sloppy because no one takes care of anything there. Wemmick’s is fine because Wemmick is nice at home. Mr. Jaggers’ house is big because of his money but gloomy because his personality is similar

    Reply

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*