September 14

It is a most miserable thing to feel ashamed of home.

Discuss the above statement which begins chapter 14.  Please consider its relevance not only to chapters 12-14, but also to the chapters that preceded it, and the plot developments that may follow.

Please, as always, be careful of spelling, punctuation, etc.  Remember, this is still an academic exchange, and while we want to express ourselves freely, we always do so in standard English!  Also, as always, be sure to respond to other comments in this thread as the discussion evolves.

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Posted September 14, 2018 by equinson in category Uncategorized

45 thoughts on “It is a most miserable thing to feel ashamed of home.

  1. mylesn

    After getting a taste of the upper class life, Pip now feels different about his home. This is a terrible thing to be ashamed of and Pip shouldn’t ever feel this way. At first Pip was excited about being an apprentice to Joe. Now he doesn’t feel that way, he actually doesn’t want to be his apprentice anymore. Pip say,”Now, it is all coarse and common.” This might change Pip’s goals in life from being and apprentice and eventually becoming a blacksmith to just getting rich. His visits to Ms. Havisham’s house have really been changing his perspective on his life.

    Reply
    1. trinityt

      I agree. Now that Pip has gotten a taste of what the sophisticated and grand life is like from his visits to Miss Havisham’s house, Pip is embarrassed of his lifestyle as Joe’s apprentice and his home because it seems “common” to him now.

      Reply
        1. Emma Garbowitz

          I agree because after being at Miss Havisham’s house PIp’s perspective of things has definitely changed. However, he does not go to the house and is just going to be working as Joe’s apprentice, which he is no longer excited about doing because something inside him has changed and we can see that in these three chapters.

          Reply
  2. Rcey Ortega

    The money Pip received from Ms. Havisham made him feel rich. Joe was “astonished” because of the five-and-twenty Guineans Pip earned. Now that they have all this money, Pip is ashamed of his home and is sad that he is. Not only that but Pip doesn’t even want to be Joe’s apprentice. However, now that he’s old enough, he still becomes his apprentice. His sister wanted to have a dinner to celebrate the money and invited Pumblechook, the Hubbles, and Mr. Wopsle. I don’t think that this will only change Pip. I think that this will also change Mrs. Gargery, Pip’s sister. I think that she will start to go a little easier on Pip now.

    Reply
  3. janem

    After frequent visits to Miss Havisham’s grand house, Pip starts to get used to a sophisticated lifestyle. In chapter 13, Pip goes to Miss Havisham’s, but this time he brings Joe. Joe is described to always look uncomfortable and out of place in nice clothes, and would rather be seen in his blacksmith attire. Here Miss Havisham tells Pip that Joe is his new master and that he won’t be seeing her anymore. Pip then reflects on how just a year before, he couldn’t wait to apprentice for Joe. But now he feels embarrassed and ashamed. He is embarrassed about being so common, and ashamed that he is embarrassed.

    Pip grew during the time he was with Miss Havisham. Before, he was just a young boy that was so involved in only his small house and his family. But after being exposed to a wealthier lifestyle, his views and motivations have changed. Pip now desires an education, and to be uncommon, when before Miss Havisham’s he just plainly wanted to apprentice for Joe. These changes will effect the upcoming events in the story because now the decisions Pip will make will ultimately lead to Pip trying getting an education and becoming less common.

    Reply
  4. maxwellw

    In chapters 12-14 Pip goes through some turmoil. The quote above is a result of Pip’s time at Mrs.Havisham’s home. After months under Mrs.Havisham, Pip’s ambition has grown greatly. Disturbingly, Pip has seemed to take on the same values as Estella and abhors Joe’s rough clothes and manners. I believe Pip is taking after Estella because of his desire for “social advancement.” This might in the future cause Pip to neglect his sister and Joe.

    Reply
  5. trinityt

    In chapters 12-14, Pip goes through some changes in, according to the book, a single year. At first, Pip was excited and happy to be Joe’s apprentice. The frequent visits to Miss Havisham’s house had gotten Pip used to the sophisticated and grand life. This has changed him. Now, Pip isn’t as excited and happy to be Joe’s apprentice as he was before. In fact, Pip is embarrassed about being Joe’s apprentice and their home. Therefore, Pip is ashamed that he feel embarrassed. According to Pip, on page 107, it said, “Now, it was all coarse and common, and I would not have had Miss Havisham and Estella see it on any account.” Pip’s lifestyle as Joe’s apprentice now was all “common”, and he feels embarrassed about it so he would not like to have Miss Havisham and Estella see him like this. So I think that in the future, there may be a moment when Miss Havisham or Estella or both, sees Pip like this as “uncommon”. Also, I think there may be a moment when Joe finds out about how Pip is feeling by Pip telling him, or find out by other ways. Either way, Joe will found out how Pip is feeling.

    Overall, chapters 12-14 had shows how much Pip has changed in a year. It also gave us ideas about how the plot might develop in the chapters later on.

    Reply
    1. trinityt

      Sorry, I made a small mistake in my response at the top. This is the exact same thing that I have at the top, except I fixed the word uncommon to common in the part about Miss Havisham and Estella seeing Pip as “common” in the future. I’m sorry about the mistake.

      In chapters 12-14, Pip goes through some changes in, according to the book, a single year. At first, Pip was excited and happy to be Joe’s apprentice. The frequent visits to Miss Havisham’s house had gotten Pip used to the sophisticated and grand life. This has changed him. Now, Pip isn’t as excited and happy to be Joe’s apprentice as he was before. In fact, Pip is embarrassed about being Joe’s apprentice and their home. Therefore, Pip is ashamed that he feel embarrassed. According to Pip, on page 107, it said, “Now, it was all coarse and common, and I would not have had Miss Havisham and Estella see it on any account.” Pip’s lifestyle as Joe’s apprentice now was all “common”, and he feels embarrassed about it so he would not like to have Miss Havisham and Estella see him like this. So I think that in the future, there may be a moment when Miss Havisham or Estella or both, sees Pip like this as “common”. Also, I think there may be a moment when Joe finds out about how Pip is feeling by Pip telling him, or find out by other ways. Either way, Joe will found out how Pip is feeling.

      Overall, chapters 12-14 had shows how much Pip has changed in a year. It also gave us ideas about how the plot might develop in the chapters later on.

      Reply
      1. mikaylaf

        I agree, I don’t think Pip will be able to hide his feelings from Joe for long, especially since they’re such good friends. I wonder how Joe will react to Pip not wanting to be his apprentice, because I think Joe was just as excited to teach Pip as Pip was before spending time at Miss Havisham’s house.

        Reply
      2. Zoe

        I think that Pip really wants to impress Estella, but kinda lost his chance when Mrs.Havisham let him go. That’s why he imagines her at the blacksmith’s window. I think that because this kind of relates to Joe that, like you said, Pip will tell Joe about his feelings and be unbound from the apprenticeship.

        Reply
  6. MadiR

    In ” Great Expectations”, Pip sadly feels ashamed of his home now that he has seen what it is like to be rich. Pip used to be proud of his house. Pip now is so embarrassed he does not want Estella or Ms. Havisham to see his house. “After that, when we went in to supper, the place and the meal would have a more homely look than ever.” (page 108) Also, Pip does not want to work as a blacksmith anymore, even though he was so excited to start this trade before his visits to Satis House. The reason Pip does follow the path of becoming a blacksmith is because he is loyal to and respects Joe. It is Joe that is teaching Pip to become a blacksmith. In this chapter, it is evident that Pip’s visits to the Satis House are creating great changes in Pip’s character.

    Reply
  7. Emma Garbowitz

    Throughout his time at Miss Havisham’s house, Pip changed and really grew as a person. At her house I think Pip just became accustomed to Miss Havisham’s lifestyle and how he is living in a more rich environment that he wasn’t used to at first. In a way, going to Miss Havisham’s house is like an escape from reality because everything is so different there from his actual home. Therefore, when Pip ends up going home, he might feel disappointed about what he does have.
    As well as this, after talking with Miss Havisham, she finds out that Pip is going to be Joe’s apprentice which he is very excited about. Then, she ends up telling Pip to bring Joe with him so they can meet. However, after talking with Joe, Miss Havisham decides that since Pip is in good hands and that he can now be Joe’s apprentice and that he no longer needs to come to her home. Soon after, Pip starts his apprenticeship with Joe. However, it doesn’t seem as enjoyable to Pip as he thought it would be at first. As well as this everything at his house seems more dreary and worse than before, including Mrs. Joe’s awful attitude. Finally, while working at the blacksmith shop, Pip imagines Miss Havisham showing him Estella’s beautiful face and hair in the fire or even seeing Estella’s face through the window believing she has come to see him at last.
    Everything changed for Pip after his time being with Miss Havisham and Estella at the old, dark house. I think Pip almost misses both Miss Havisham and Estella because while he is working he often day dreams about seeing them once again. I think Pip just sees his life as much less exciting without them in it and that nothing interesting is going to occur. It is almost as if Pip is just going to be living out his life as if the same thing happens everyday. Pip has definitely changed throughout the course of the year and I think that Miss Havisham and Estella have something to do with it. They both played such key rolls in his life, although they were both odd and different from most people and I just think that Pip wants life just like before he stopped going to their home to visit them. Therefore, Pip has definitely changed and grew as a person throughout these chapters.

    Reply
    1. stephaniec

      I agree. I think that Pip was in a different world when he was at Ms. Havisham’s house, and going back home is going back to reality.

      Reply
    2. Laila Sayegh

      I agree, it must be weird for Pip seeing all of Miss Havisham’s luxuries and then having to go back to reality in his own home.

      Reply
  8. Hannah Pitkofsky

    At the beginning of chapter 14, we see that Pip is a lot less grateful about his living space than he was before the visits to Ms. Havisham’s and Uncle Pumblechook’s houses. Pip thinks his bedroom is smaller than he remembered, the house isn’t as clean, and that it isn’t as nice as he thought it was before the visits. He doesn’t want Ms. Havisham and Estella to look at his house and be ashamed and upset. Once he has seen what it is like to be rich, he can never go back to what he though beforehand.

    Reply
    1. Hannah M.

      I agree that Pip is very ungrateful for what he has. I think he is too caught up with being rich with estella to see how grateful he SHOULD be. Also, he is worried what estella will think of him if she sees his house. That is something he should not worry about am I right!? He should be grateful he even has a house

      Reply
  9. Hannah M.

    Pip’s perspective has changed after he sees what it’s like to be rich. Pip is ashamed of his house and his lifestyle. Those are two things he should not overlook and it’s a terrible thing to be ashamed of. He is disappointed in what he has and is ungrateful, compared to when he is at Ms.Havishams house where he escapes reality and feels better about himself. Pip was thrilled to be Joe’s apprentice, but now he no longer wants to be an apprentice and become a blacksmith. Pip describes being an apprentice as “..all course and common.” Pip is continuing as an apprentice, but is dreading it because something has changed about Pip. His goal is to become rich not be a blacksmith. This proves that Ms.Havishams visits have really changed Pip!

    Reply
    1. mirandak

      I definitely agree! It is so terrible to be ashamed of your lifestyle and home because you aren’t extremely wealthy! Riches and luxury may cause you to have a better image in the eyes of others, but it will never change the kind of person you are within. Hopefully, Pip will soon see that he doesn’t need to have affluence to live a good, joyous life!

      Reply
  10. mikaylaf

    Throughout the year Pip spent at Miss Havisham’s house, he changed as a person. Pip had grown used to Miss Havisham’s comfortable way of living. Now that Pip is back at home, he is ashamed of the poorness of his family. Before his time at Miss Havisham’s house, Pip was very much looking forward to being Joe’s apprentice and learning how to be a blacksmith. Now, he wishes he didn’t have to be a blacksmith. Pip thinks, “Once, it had seemed to me that when I should at last roll up my shirt-sleeves and go into the forge, Joe’s ‘prentice, I should be distinguished and happy. Now the reality was in my hold, I only felt that I was dusty with the smell of small-coal…” (page 107) Based on this quote, you can see that Pip is really unhappy now that he is back in his normal, common life. In addition to wishing he weren’t Joe’s apprentice, Pip says he would never want Miss Havisham nor Estella to see his house and know how poor he really is. Pip says, “Now it was all coarse and common, and I would not have had Miss Havisham and Estella see it on my account” (page 107) However, Pip contradicts himself in this chapter. Even though he is ashamed of his house and his life, he also feels guilty of his wishes to be wealthier. Pip definitely misses Miss Havisham and Estella, and although he may not miss their personalities, he misses their way of life. The year Pip spent at Miss Havisham’s house truly changed Pip, and in the next few chapters we will see if Pip will return to his old self again.

    Reply
    1. Casey

      I agree. Pip should take a step back and realize how fortunate he is to have a home and people to take care of him. He shouldn’t be ashamed of his wealth or class.

      Reply
  11. mirandak

    Throughout the novel, we have a firsthand look at Pip’s character progression and development. We watch him grow and shed his innocence of youth, as he becomes discontent with his “ordinary” life and begins to long for uncommonness.
    Essentially, in the beginning of the novel, Pip is shown to be “satisfied” with his life. This is not to say that he did not face his own struggles and difficulties that made his home life unbearable at times (his experience with his sister), but he had no major complaints. There was even a time when he spoke of his future apprenticeship to Joe with excitement, as the two would get to bond with each other. However, after months and months of visits to Miss Havisham, new perspectives and lifestyles were drilled into his head, and soon, he no longer enjoyed his own, hence why he said he was miserably ashamed of his home. Once he got a taste of “living in the lap of luxury,” he wanted more and more. He soon began to dread his apprenticeship to Joe, constantly in the mindset of, “What would Estella think of this? She wouldn’t approve of it. She would think of it as common.” and so on until eventually the young Pip we knew was no more. The sensitive, curious, well-behaved little boy that we had grown accustomed to had vanished, and in his place, a young man who wanted a life out of the ordinary, the finer things in life, and desperately wanted to escape from his own. So, because of his immense change of character, I believe that Pip, who used to be quite obedient and mannerly, will begin to defy his sister and Joe. Maybe he will even make an attempt to run away, or worm his way out of his apprenticeship! Either way, I feel as if a big change is coming soon!

    Reply
    1. angelicac1

      I agree with you! It’s like Pip wants to be a completely different person that lives a lavish life like Miss Havisham and Estella.

      Reply
  12. Brishti Sarkar

    Going to Miss Havisham’s house for the past year has made Pip grow accustomed to the wealthy lifestyle. Before, he never thought about his living conditions, but now, he is more conscious and is frequently feels dissatisfied with his family’s lack of wealth. This also ties in with Pip’s feelings toward being apprenticed by Joe. He used to think that it would be great to be apprenticed by someone close to him. Now, he realizes he will never get the same luxurious life as Miss Havisham or Estella, and this causes him to be ungrateful. I think this will tie into the future chapters because he will lie more often about his social class and will grow to despise his sister and especially Joe, who he once looked up to and respected all his life.

    Reply
  13. Maddie

    The statement, “It is a most miserable thing to feel ashamed of home” means that while Pip visits Miss Havisham’s fancy, large house, he feels embarrassed of his own home. Each time Pip goes to see Miss Havisham and talks to Estella, she makes fun of him and causes him to feel bad about himself. Also, he experiences the life of rich people and compares it to his own life, while he should be showing gratitude for the fact that he has a home and people to care for him, while some don’t even have that. Also, in chapter 12, Pip seems proud that he is going to be Joe’s apprentice, but as time goes on, Pip feels ashamed that he is going to be a blacksmith, and would rather be rich. He used to be content with his life, but his visits to Miss Havisham’s house have impacted him greatly. Hopefully Pip will realize that at least he has something, because some have nothing. I am excited to see how Pip progresses, and the decisions he will make in the future.

    Reply
  14. josepha4

    As Pip begins to grow accustomed to the high-living of Mrs. Havisham and Estella, he begins to compare what he has with what they have. This is unfair due to the low income of the “commoner” Gargery family has and the tremendous wealth of the aristocratic Mrs. Havisham. seeing the disparity, he begins to long for wealth and to be less “common.” He starts to see his own life as dull and unacceptable, which scares him. Pip used to think his path for manhood and happiness was to become Joe’s apprentice. Now it seems to him that this would be a terrible, unfulfilling, dirty future. Pip now sees himself through Estella’s perspective and concludes she finds him and his future self disgusting. The life of unfair comparisons, and dissatisfaction with his place in life has placed Pip on a self-destructive path from which he may never return.

    Reply
  15. Casey

    After spending a year visiting Ms. Havisham’s house, Pip get used to her rich, privileged way of life. He feels ashamed because he doesn’t live in a mansion like she and Estella does. He begins to work as an apprentice to Joe, (only because Joe is one of his only friends) he doesn’t want to be the town’s blacksmith. Estella makes fun of him when she see that he is not as rich as she is. This makes Pip feel even worse about himself. “It is a most miserable thing to feel ashamed of home.” This means that it is pretty terrible to be unhappy about your home or your lifestyle. It makes me feel bad for Pip because no one should feel bad about something that can’t change. Maybe this will motivate Pip to work hard in the future so he can afford a house like Ms. Havisham’s, even though money isn’t everything. Until then, I hope Pip will realize how great his life is compared to the lives of others.

    Reply
  16. jaclynl

    Pip has begun to get used to the rich, sophisticated life at Ms. Havisham’s and now is looking at his own life and feeling down about it. We saw from the first visit that Pip was upset about what he had versus Ms. Havisham’s and now we’re seeing it again. He doesn’t want to just be a common boy anymore. Pip used to look forward to being Joe’s apprentice someday but now I think he wants more than that. He doesn’t want to work with the town’s blacksmith and he even becomes ashamed of it. I think that this feeling of insecurity could negatively affect Pip’s character and self-esteem later on. This can result in some plot developments later on and change Pip’s future.

    Reply
    1. emilyr6

      I agree that Pip wants to be more than a common village boy. He wants a more fancy lifestyle, like the one that Estella has. This way of thinking will eventually lead to him not being satisfied with the good things that he has.

      Reply
  17. emilyr6

    After spending so much time around wealthy people, Pip got used to such a fancy lifestyle. Now that he no longer gets to visit, he is starting to feel ashamed. Even with all of the money that he got from Ms. Havisham, Pip still wishes that he had an expensive lifestyle, like Estella. He is ashamed of how poor his family is and he does not like his life anymore. Once someone is introduced to a better way to live, they want to live like them instead of the way they used to. They forget that what they have is pretty good and that they should be happy with what they have. Pip is feeling this now and he is ashamed of how he lives. He does not want to be Joe’s apprentice because if he is the town’s blacksmith than he will never be as rich as Estella and his life will always be the same. On page 107 Pip thinks, “Once it had seemed to me that when I should at last roll up my shirt-sleeves and go into the forge, Joe’s ‘prentice, I should be distinguished and happy. Now the reality was in my hold and I only felt that I was dusty with the dust of small-coal, and that I had a weight upon my daily remembrance to which the anvil was a feather.” Pip used to think that once he finally became Joe’s apprentice, that he would be happy. Now that the time has finally come, Pip is not content. He was introduced to a different way of life and being a blacksmith would never allow him to live like that. Pip forgot that money does not make happiness and that the life he has now is really good. Once he realizes that his life is not as bad as he is making it, he will realize that he should be proud to be Joe’s apprentice.

    Reply
  18. Sunna

    Pip has become so used to going to Ms. Havisham’s house, and when he was given money from her, he starts to feel insecure. He sees his whole life differently. He wants to live like Estella, even with the money he received. His room seems smaller and his house seems dirtier. While Pip used to look forward to being Joe’s apprentice, he now wants to do more. He now feels insecure about his whole life, and feels bad about it. I personally don’t think that Pip will lose himself entirely, but wills definitely go through some major character development as he matures.

    Reply
    1. Kate

      I agree, and think that one of those changes will be acting shyer about his home, like he doesn’t want people to know about the common life he leads.

      Reply
  19. stephaniec

    Throughout the novel, Pip has undergone a tremendous change in perspective, that will most likely change the course of the story. As shown in the beginning of the novel, Pip was thrilled to be an apprentice to Joe, and could not think of anything better. Although, as the visits to Ms. Havisham progress, little changes are shown in the way Pip thinks and acts. He started to think and worry about what other people thought of him. After going to Ms. Havisham’s house for months, Pip felt ashamed of his uncommon life, and even felt embarrassed about going back to his own house after being with Ms. Havisham. He was so used to the upper class life that when the opportunity struck to be Joe’s apprentice, he dreaded it. The life that he wanted so bad was no longer exciting to him anymore. He wanted more! Pip wanted to change the lifestyle he grew up in, and make it something worthy. I think over the next few chapters Pip will act on his desire to become “common” and will go through a big change in his characters development.

    Reply
  20. Zoe

    The quote, “It is a most miserable thing to feel ashamed of home,” relates to a lot of events that happened in the book so far. As soon as you start reading this book, you are introduced to Mrs.Joe, who raises Pip up “by hand” and is constantly hurting Pip for every bad thing he does. He must always feel ashamed of the way his parents are, beating him and never standing up against it. Although Joe helps Pip through it, he never thought once to save Pip from the struggle and run away with him. Also, after visiting Mrs.Havisham’s house for several months, he starts to feel ashamed of the poor household he lives in. His father is a blacksmith and his house is very small. He wants more than anything in the world to be rich and smart like Estella. Then, one day, Mrs.Havisham ask for Joe to come to her house. She tells Pip that he is free to be the apprentice to Joe and gives them 25 pounds. When they get back to Mrs.Joe and Mr.Pumblechook, Mr Pumblechook suggests that Pip should be bound to Joe as an apprentice. Pip feels ashamed to have such a common job, and when he starts his job, can’t help but imagine Estella at the small window. The fact that she would come back to him even though he was common kept his hopes up. When he would go back to dinner, he would feel more ashamed than ever, with his simple meals, after a simple job. This was not what he wanted his life to be, and he was stuck with it.

    Reply
  21. angelicac1

    After spending a year visiting Miss Havisham’s lavish house, Pip has gotten accustomed to Miss Havisham’s and Estella’s wealthy living. The past year has really changed Pip’s perspective on how he’s living his life. He’s now ashamed of his own home because he’s gotten so used to being in Miss Havisham’s sophisticated home. Pip definitely went through a lot of character growth after meeting Miss Havisham and Estella and he’s no longer the innocent boy from the beginning of the story that we all met.

    Reply
  22. Sophie

    The quote “It is a most miserable thing to feel ashamed oh home”, is quite a meaningful quote. It seems to me that this could be another possible rising action, that’s leading to a big turning point. Lately, Pip has been going to Miss Havisham very often, and has gotten used to her house and her ways of living and most importantly her personality. Miss Havisham lives a very different life than Pip. She lives in a large house, with lots of helpers and lots of money and wealth. After Pip goes out to her house and experiences some of these luxuries, he starts to compare it to his own simple life which makes him instead of appreciate what he has, (like he used to), he’s now starting to look down on his home. Like the quote says, he feels ashamed of it. This event kind of reminds me of a situation lots of families go through. Sometimes there are kinds of parents that are more overprotective, and are cautious about what their children are experiencing in the outside world. Events that happen in public outside of the home, could expose the child, or change their opinion on certain things, could sometimes severely affect their life at home with their family. Parents sometimes don’t like to see that happen, because it’s changing their child without their control. This is similar to Pip’s situation because although he doesn’t have overprotective parents, he got exposed to other people daily lives, and it’s now changed his opinion of his own.

    Reply
  23. Laila Sayegh

    The quote “It is a most miserable thing to feel ashamed of home”, is a very important quote that says a lot about Pip’s character in the past few chapters. After spending much of his time in the Satis House, and then having to return back to his home, Pip realizes that he probably will never be able to experience the luxury of the Satis House in his own home. Instead of focusing on what he has, Pip continues to compare his life to Miss Havisham’s. Miss Havisham has a lot of money, Pip and his family do not. Miss Havisham lives in a large, grande house, Pip does not. When all of these things cross Pip’s mind, he feels ashamed and embarrassed about the life that he is living and wants to live more like Miss Havisham and Estella. One example of this is when Pip says that instead of being an apprentice as planned, he wants to have a job of the higher class so that he can be wealthy, just like the people who live in the Satis House. Overall, Pip has gone through a major change in these past few chapters and I hope he is able to realize that he should be grateful for what he has and not ashamed of it.

    Reply
    1. Kate Ma.

      I agree that Pip is money hungry and would rather leave behind his family and not work with Joe just to try and get a higher job.

      Reply
  24. Kate Ma.

    Once Pip visited Ms. Havisham’s house his perspective has changed based on his lifestyle. He soon discovers that his house is small and untidy. Also that his parents have common jobs that he doesn’t want. Pip becomes ungrateful and concerned that he doesn’t live like Estella and Ms. Havisham. Pip focuses on what he doesn’t have which isn’t good. The quote, “It is a most miserable thing to feel ashamed of home” represents the way Pip has been feeling about him and his family. Pip grieves over how far away he is from wealth and becomes extremely ungrateful. I don’t think Pip will get over this in upcoming chapters.

    Reply
  25. johnh1

    This quote refers to Pip’s changing point of view on his home and lifestyle. Now he is a blacksmith’s apprentice and a while ago this seemed like a good thing but in previous chapters he was at Ms. Havisham’s house and while he was there he saw people with an easier life and was shamed for being poor. Now he is ashamed of his life and profession. Over these chapters he has really started to change and think about the problems with his life and what he wants his life to be like.

    Reply
  26. Kate

    After spending So much time in Miss Havisham’s upper class house, the statement, “It is a most miserable thing to feel ashamed of home.” implies that Pip is ashamed of his lower class house. Throughout these chapters, Pip doesn’t focus on or appreciate what he has, and instead only sees it as less then in comparison to what Miss Havisham has. And example of this is when Pip thinks to himself how small his home is when compared to luxurious size of the Satis House. In conclusion, after getting the knowledge of the upper classes daily lives, he can only see his own as embarrassing, and I predict that it will have an impact on how he acts at home or around his family.

    Reply

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