September 7

So I called myself Pip, and came to be called Pip.

Dickens is perhaps best known for his varied and vibrant characters.  This weekend, please choose one character and describe your impressions of that character so far.  Please use many specific text-based details to support your response.

In addition, please read your classmates’ responses and comment on at least one of their responses in this thread as well.  You may agree or disagree, but remember, we must always treat each other with great respect.

Please be sure you proofread anything you write here for spelling, punctuation, and grammar.  An important tip:  Never, ever use a lowercase “i” for the first person nominative case pronoun!

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Posted September 7, 2018 by equinson in category Great Expectations

52 thoughts on “So I called myself Pip, and came to be called Pip.

  1. ATheCrazyCatLady

    Ms. Quinson, I like your new blog background. It’s more colorful than last year’s. I hope you have a great year. Everyone, you are so lucky that you have Ms. Quinson this year. Have fun! 🙂

    Reply
  2. mirandak

    As I continued to read “Great Expectations,” I became rather intrigued when Mr. Joe Gargery was introduced in the novel. My first impression of him was that he was quite timid and goodhearted, but also “malleable” and weak, as Mrs. Joe Gargery was quite overbearing and harsh, always able to “twist him around her finger,” as he was too kind and mannerly to object and set her straight. Furthermore, other than his interactions with his wife, he is shown to be good friends and quite close to Pip, as they have both had to suffer at the hand of Pip’s older sister. For instance, his personality is shown in the novel when it states, “He was a mild, good-natured, sweet-tempered, easy-going, foolish, dear fellow – a sort of Hercules in strength, and also in weakness.” (p.8) As this description is given by Pip, it is clear that Pip admires Joe’s “pure” personality, but also knows that for this reason Joe is also subject to the ways of his domineering wife. Also, the friendship that Pip and Joe share is shown when in the text it states, “When I ran home from the churchyard, the forge was shut up, and Joe was sitting alone in the kitchen. Joe and I being fellow sufferers, and having confidences as such, Joe imparted a confidence to me, the moment I raised the latch of the door and peeped in at him opposite to it, sitting in the chimney corner.
    ‘Mrs. Joe has been out a dozen times, looking for you, Pip. And she’s out now, making it a baker’s dozen.'” (p.8) Essentially, although Joe is married to Pip’s older sister, he doesn’t hesitate to warn and help Pip in situations with Mrs. Gargery, as they both have to endure her, and therefore confide in each other about their problems/assist each other should a problem arise. So, basically, while he may not be the main character of the story, he is still an all around good guy, as well as a valuable asset to Pip and the novel as a whole.

    Reply
    1. trinityt

      I agreed! Joe is a kind man and a great friend to Pip. This support the fact that Joe has an impact on Pip. Joe is the kind of character that I find myself grown attached to, you could say, like other similar characters in other books and movies. That’s why it’s always sad to me when something bad happens to those characters in books or movies. Overall, Joe is a great, and kind character.

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    2. angelicac1 :)

      Mr. Joe Gargery is such an intriguing character! I agree that he’s goodhearted and that it causes him to be weak around Mrs. Joe Gargery. Part of me wonders if he will remain weak around his wife because of his personality or if he will change the way he acts around her.

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  3. trinityt

    There are more than one character that interested me in “Great Expectations” However, the one that interested me the most is Joe. On page 8, it said, “Joe was a fair man…He was a mild, good-natured, sweet-tempered, easy-going, foolish dear fellow- a sort of Hercules in strength, and also in weakness.” This show that Joe is a kind-hearted man with a good personality. This also shows that Joe is a good guy in Pip’s eyes since he described Joe as “a sort of Hercules” (pg.8). Also on page 9, it said, “‘Well,’ said Joe, glancing up at the Dutch clock, ‘she’s been on the Ram-page, this last spell, about five minutes, Pip. She’s a coming! Get behind the door, old chap, and have the jack-towel betwixt you.'” Once again on page 9, it said, “She concluded by throwing me- I often served her as a connubial missile- at Joe, who, glad to get hold of me on any terms, passed me on into the chimney and quietly fenced me up there with his great leg.” Joe is not only a kind man, but also a strong and supportive person since he warn Pip about Mrs. Joe Gargery, and support and protect him as well. This also made Joe a strong person because he has to deal with the harsh Mrs. Joe Gargery at times, since he and Pip are “fellow-sufferers” (pg.8), and help and support Pip at times like these. Even though Joe is not the main character, he is a good guy and has an impact on Pip.

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  4. angelicac1 :)

    While reading “Great Expectations,” I’ve noticed and thought about Mrs. Joe Gargery. She’s not a character that readers would prefer as their favorite character and I definitely don’t prefer her as my favorite, but to me she can be interesting if you think about it. My first impression of Mrs. Joe developed on page. 9. When Pip returns from the churchyard and Mrs. Joe returns from her search for him, she responds to his arrival by throwing Pip at her husband. She says, “Where have you been, you young monkey?” and “Tell me directly what you’ve been doing to wear me away with fret and fright and worrit…” These sentences she had spoken showed me that although she acts harsh to Pip, she does care about him, but she just doesn’t show it. The way she treats Pip gives me some “Aunt Polly” vibes from the book “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer”.
    On page 14, I learned something else about Mrs. Joe. Pip said that his sister, “…never was polite, unless there was company.” Learning this came as a shock to me. I thought Mrs. Joe would be the type of person who wouldn’t care about how she acted around people, but I was proved wrong. I’m certainly intrigued by Mrs. Joe and I’m ready to see her different personas displayed throughout this book.

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    1. mylesn

      I agree with you, Ms.Joe does remind me of the character “Aunt Polly” from “Adventures of Tom Sawyer”. She takes Pip i, like Aunt Polly
      took Tom in and just like Aunt Polly, Ms.Joe is very strict with Pip

      Reply
      1. mirandak

        That’s a really interesting comparison that I never considered before but I do agree! She does remind me of Aunt Polly! They both care deep down inside, but present themselves very differently on the outside as if to show that they are a strict, better guardian, and to discipline the child.

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      2. Brishti Sarkar

        I think Aunt Polly and Mrs. Joe play the same role, but they are portrayed differently. Aunt Polly, on one hand, was remorseful whenever she hit Tom, and it shows that she cared about him, whereas Mrs. Joe is more intense and she repeatedly said that she wants Pip to die. Also, most of the time, Tom deserved his punishments, whereas Pip hardly does anything that makes Mrs. Joe despise him.

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        1. angelicac1

          You have a point that Aunt Polly and Mrs. Joe play the same role, but I disagree with you on the part when you said that Mrs. Joe despises Pip. Mrs. Joe went on a search for Pip and she said that he wore her away with, “…fret and fright and worrit.” This shows that Mrs. Joe does care about Pip. Yes, she may act like she despises him, but in my opinion, she doesn’t. Deep down she probably cares about him, but she just doesn’t show it. Instead she spits out harsh words and does intense actions to Pip that causes readers to think that she hates him.

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    2. hannahp2

      I agree with your point because she a character that is not a favorite, but she helps the main character into shaping him into who he is today. She is also very worried and wants the best for Pip as Aunt Polly wants the best fir Tom and Sid.

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  5. mylesn

    The character that most intrigued me was Ms.Joe. She seemed to be just like “Aunt Polly” from “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer”. It got me thinking if in Charles Dickens life, was there a person who was very close to him that he based the characters off of? Ms.Joe also had some major differences from Aunt Polly, one thing is that Ms.Joe seem much more bossy and stricter than Aunt Polly ever was. She also seemed to use a lot more physical punishments.”She concluded by throwing me-I often served as her connubial missile-at Joe, who, glad to get hold of me on any terms, passed me o into the chimney and quietly fenced me up there with his great leg.” Joe seemed like a good fatherly figure in Pips life, and a protector of Pip from Ms.Joe.

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    1. Kate Mathis

      I agree that Joe serves as a protector for Pip. I think that Joe understands how Pip feels since he is living with Mrs.Joe and sees how unfair he gets treated and definitely wants to do anything he can to help Pip.

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    2. jaclynl

      I agree and also thought of Aunt Polly when I started reading the book. Both characters have a lot of similarities, but as you said, they can be very different at the same time. I feel like Aunt Polly was more afraid to punish Tom and Mrs. Joe is okay with harsh and strict punishments.

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  6. mikaylaf

    After reading the first six chapters of “Great Expectations,” Mrs. Joe Gargery’s character had an impression on me. Mrs. Joe certainly isn’t a character that I would relate myself to, but the way she presents herself in the beginning of the novel is very interesting. On page nine, we meet Mrs. Joe. After Pip returns from the churchyard, Mrs. Joe goes on to tell Pip how she doesn’t know why she took him on. “‘I’d never do it again! I know that. I may truly say I’ve never had this apron of mine off, since born you were.'” (page 9) Based on this evidence, you would think that Mrs. Joe is a mean woman with a horrible personality who doesn’t love Pip. On the contrary, she does seem to care about Pip, because she does worry about him and where he’s been. She says, “Tell me directly what you’ve been doing to wear me away with fright…” (page 9) As expected, her personality changes into one of hospitality on Christmas Day when she has company over. The text states, “My sister was uncommonly lively on the present occasion…” (page 25) Pip sees right through her cheeriness and he knows it’s just an act. Again, though, Mrs. Joe confuses me when she says “‘ If you bring the boy back with his head blown to bits by a musket, don’t look to me to put it together again.'” (page 33) Mrs. Joe’s changing personality will make me question her to the very end of the book.

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    1. madilynr

      I agree! Mrs. Joe’s personality is intriguing. I also question the motive of some of her actions. I didn’t picture has as the type of person that cares what other people may think of her, but she must if she feels like she has to act so perfect in front of others.

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  7. Kate Mathis

    One character that interested me the most in “Great Expectations”, was Pip. Pip is a young boy who lives with his cruel sister who beats him when he makes mistakes. Pip becomes sensitive and scared throughout chapters one through six. Pips feelings escalate when he meets the convict in the churchyard and just after that gets beat by Mrs. Joe. For instance, “At this dismal intelligence, I twisted the only button on my waistcoat round and round, and looked in great depression at the fire” (page 8). As shown, Pip is extremely nervous at whats about to happen to him when his sister returns home after looking for him. On page fifteen, Pips thoughts are filled with shock, “I was in mortal terror of the young man who wanted my heart and liver; I was in mortal terror of my interlocuter with the ironed leg; I was in mortal terror of myself, from whom an awful promise had been extracted;” This goes to show how terrified and sensitive Pip is. I wonder if Pip will grow to be stronger than he is now.

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    1. mikaylaf

      I agree, Pip does seem scared throughout these chapters. He is not only scared of his mean sister and of the man who wants his heart and liver, but of what Mrs. Joe will do to him if she finds out that he stole from her. This can be expected, as Pip knows that Mrs. Joe will punish him severely. What interests me more is that Pip is scared of how Joe will react, since Joe is a very good friend of Pip’s, and Pip doesn’t want to let him down. This shows how much Pip values Joe’s friendship, and how he doesn’t want to lose it.

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  8. maxwellw

    I’d say the character that has me most interested in “Great Expectations” was the stranger Pip met. Even though we know virtually nothing about him, we get plenty of context clues the raise some good questions. When I read about the stranger, I thought he was a very imposing and intimidating figure, who seemed to have no qualms with threatening Pip. Though the man is harsh at first, it’s revealed that he’s only desperate for food. I think that these points make it all the more strange that the man adamantly tells Pip that he should, “never dare say a word or dare make a sign concerning your having seen a person such as me.”[pg.6] When I read this line in particular, it had me wondering what reason the stranger would have for keeping his identity confidential. I believe one reason behind the man’s confidentiality may have been unknowingly given to the reader by Joe, as he does tell Pip that “There was a convict off last night.”[pg.14] Another question I had pertaining to Pip’s encounter with this man is how will he affect Pip’s character development. I ask this as it was obvious how uncomfortable the prospect of lying to Mrs.Joe was for him.

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  9. hannahp2

    As I started reading the novel, I became very intrigued by Mrs. Joe Gargery because she reminded me a lot of Aunt Polly from “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer”. From what I can tell from the context throughout the first few chapters, she is Pip’s older sister who has raised him because both of their parents died. This has made her very protective and strict with Pip. One of the first things we hear her say is, “Where have you been, you young monkey? Tell me directly what you’ve been doing to wear me away with fret and fright and worrit…” (pg. 9) When Pip told her where he was (the churchyard), she freaked out again and exclaimed, “If it warn’t for me you’d have been to the churchyard long ago, and stayed there.” (pg. 9) Joe Gargery and his wife have taken on the parental roles, and, in my opinion, they do a good job at it because they have grown very attached to Pip and want to make sure he’s safe. These traits are very similar to those of Aunt Polly who, like Mrs. Joe Gargery, are very protective and attached to those in their care.

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    1. Laila Sayegh

      I agree that Mrs. Joe is very similar to Aunt Polly. They both are very strict but want the best for the kids they are raising!

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      1. Emma Garbowitz

        I agree with you that Mrs. Joe does remind me of Aunt Polly. They are both very strict parents and have similar parenting styles. However, I think that Aunt Polly was less harsh than Mrs. Joe because she never wished that she didn’t have Tom. As well as this Pip is a better behaved kid than Tom and I think Mrs. Joe can be hard on him, especially for just asking a few simple questions. Therefore I think Aunt Polly and Mrs. Joe have their similarities but they also have their differences

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      2. Madison Lusk

        As I was reading I also made the connection that Mrs. Joe Gargery was similar to Aunt Polly. They are both very strict, and the are both raising children that aren’t their own.

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  10. madilynr

    The character that impressed me the most after reading the first six chapters of “Great Expectations” is Joe Gargery. Joe is the kind blacksmith who helps raise Pip, the main character, along with his wife, Pip’s sister, Mrs. Joe Gargery. I think Pip really needs Joe in the beginning of this novel. Pip describes Joe on page 8 as follows, “He was a mild, good-natured, sweet-tempered, easy going, foolish, dear fellow – a sort of Hercules in strength, and also in weakness.” I definitely agree with Pip’s description of Joe. For example, when Pip was eating Christmas dinner all of the grown ups were picking on him, except Joe who kept giving him more gravy. In my opinion, Joe treats Pip like his own child. Mrs. Joe is obligated to raise Pip, because he is her brother and although she loves him, she treats him more like a burden. Another kind action Joe has done for Pip was carry him during the hunt as depicted on page 34, “A bitter sleet came rattling against us here on the east wind, and Joe took me on his back.” Joe clearly cares for Pip.

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  11. jaclynl

    As I began reading “Great Expectations” this weekend, one character that I thought was very interesting was Mrs. Joe. As we’ve seen so far, Mrs. Joe, being Pip’s older sister, is raising him since his parents have died. She comes off as very strict and mean at times. “If it warn’t for me you’d have been to the churchyard long ago, and stayed there.” (Pg. 9) Many readers may see this character and not like her because of the way she acts towards the main protagonist, Pip. Beyond these first impressions though, part of me wonders about Mrs. Joe’s past and if there’s a reason why she acts so cruel to Pip in many scenarios. I wonder what her childhood was like and start to think that maybe she didn’t have a good one herself, which is why her character is like this. Either way, I’m so excited to continue reading and see how this character and all the others develop throughout the story.

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    1. Sunna

      I agree, there must have been something in her past to make her so cruel and unwilling to show affection. She clearly wants Pip to be safe, but she isn’t as openly caring as most people would be in their situation. But her character is very interesting and I’m sure that there’s more to her story than what it seems.

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  12. Sunna

    While reading Great Expectations, by Charles Dickens, the character that has fascinated me most so far was the convict that threatened Pip. At first, I saw him as a horrible person, especially when he threatened to cut Pip’s throat. But when we saw how he was living, starved and freezing, I pitied him a little, but I still didn’t necessarily feel bad for him after what he had done. However, when he was caught by the sergeants, Pip had tried to tell him that he hadn’t sold him out. However, Pip said that, “It was not at all expressed to me that he even comprehended my intentions, for he gave me a look that I did not understand, and it all passed in a moment.” That interested me because I think that the convict definitely did understand what Pip was trying to tell him. But if he was really so cruel, he could have easily told the others about what Pip had done for him, but he never said anything. I thought that was the most interesting thing that he did. On page 39, he says, “‘A man can’t starve; at least I can’t. I took some wittles, up at the village over yonder — where the church stands a’most out on the marshes.’” He explains that he stole from the blacksmith, but why would he do that? If he is such a cruel person, why not just make Pip’s life miserable by saying that Pip stole food for him? Has he started to sympathize with Pip? That makes me think that there is more to his character, and I would love to know his background. For these reasons, I think that the convict is the most interesting character so far.

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    1. emilyr6

      I think that you bring up some very interesting points. I also wonder why the convict did not immediately rat Pip out. Maybe he is actually not a completely awful person and when he threatened to cut Pip’s throat it was just because he was starving to death. It seems like there is more to this character than meets the eye and I hope that we eventually discover what his motives are.

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  13. Sophie

    The first 6 chapters of “Great Expectations” have been very fascinating. If I were to pick one character that had the biggest impression on me I would choose Mr. Joe Gargery. As I was reading, I felt a strong sense of favoritism towards Joe. Pip doesn’t have many loved ones in his life, and the fact that Joe has the kindness in him to really love and appreciate Pip really makes me love the book even more. In chapter 4, when all of the adults at dinner were talking about Pip in not super positive ways, the text states, “But he always aided and comforted me when he could, in some way of his own, and he always did so at dinner time by giving me gravy.” (page 26). (This is referring to Pip saying that Joe was always there for him). Even though spooning gravy to Pip is such a little gesture, sometimes the small heartfelt actions are the ones that make the biggest difference. It must have felt nice for Pip to have support in such a large group of adults. Another reason why I’m really excited to keep reading is because I want to find out if the relationship between Joe and Pip will have an impact on the story. During chapter 5 when they are out in the marshes dealing with the 2 men, there was a couple sweet moments between them. “A bitter sleet came rattling against us here on the east wind, and Joe took me on his back.” (page 34). That was very caring of Joe to carry Pip. Then finally on page 41, the text states from Pip, “…I loved Joe.” Overall, Joe was a very special character to me and definitely makes me want to keep reading to find out how his role contributes to Pip’s life.

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    1. Casey

      I agree with your analogy. It seems as if Pip sees Joe Gargery as his only family, because of how rude Mrs. Joe Gargery is to him. I think Pip and Joe fear her together in a way, even though Mrs. Joe Gargery is Pip’s older sister and only living family.

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  14. stephaniec

    As I continued to read “Great Expectations,” I became more invested with the convict Pip first encountered in the churchyard. This character shaped the way Pip acted and thought throughout the first couple chapters and made a big impact on him. My first impression of him is that he was intimidating, cruel, and frightening. For instance, when he first sees Pip he says “‘Keep still, you little devil, or I’ll cut your throat!’”. At first he seemed to be full of nothing but bad intentions. He threatened and taunted Pip into bringing him a file and food or else he would take his heart and liver. However, he showed his true colors when it mattered most. He had the perfect opportunity to expose Pip for stealing in front of the soldiers sent by the King, Joe(the blacksmith and Pip’s caregiver), and Mr. Wopsle(the clerk at Pip’s church). He chose to lie and say that he stole the goods from the blacksmith’s house. He covered for Pip by saying “‘I know, but this is another pint, a separate matter. A man can’t starve; at least I can’t. I took some wittels, up at the willage over yonder where the church stands a’most out on the marshes.’”(pg 39). The convict ended up saving Pip from the wrath of his sister(Mrs. Joe Gargery) and his own guilty conscience. I hope to learn more about this character because I find him very interesting!

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    1. Rcey Ortega

      I agree, I think the convict is intimidating, cruel and frightening. I also believe that the convict had a big impact on Pip and his actions. For example, Pip stole to give the convict what he wanted.

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  15. Rcey Ortega

    While I was reading the book “Great Expectations”, the character that grabbed my attention the most was Mr. Joe Gargery. My first impressions on Joe were that he was childish and he liked playing with Pip. During chapter two it seemed like Joe and Pip were trying to see who could eat their bread-and-butter first. While Joe wasn’t looking Pip hid his bread-and-butter on his leg. When Joe looked back at Pip he saw that Pip’s bread was gone. Joe knew that Pip didn’t finish his bread so quickly. “Pip, old chap! You’ll do yourself a mischief. It’ll stick somewhere. You can’t have chawed it, Pip.” (Pg 11) I really like Joe and how he plays with Pip. I am looking forward to see if Joe changes throughout the story.

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  16. Laila Sayegh

    One character that I was very intrigued by while reading Great Expectations by Charles Dickens was the convict that Pip met in the first chapter. The convict is described as “A fearful man, all in coarse grey, with a great iron on his leg. A man with no hat, and with broken shoes, and with an old rag tied round his head.” (Pg. 4) Right off the bat, this mysterious man seemed like a very intimidating character. When I saw him threaten an innocent boy like Pip, I automatically assumed he was going to be the antagonist of the story. As I continued to read the novel, I saw a different side to the scary man. I saw him suffering in the cold weather, depending on a young boy to supply him with food. This leads me to believe that the convict is not a bad man, but he needed to harshly threaten Pip to bring him food in order to survive. One thing that I found very interesting is that on page twenty, Pip refers to the convict as “my friend”. In the first chapter, I do not think Pip would have ever referred to the man as his friend. This makes me believe that Pip and the convict were slowly beginning to bond with one another. In chapter six, Pip is with the sergeant when he catches the convict and he confesses to giving the convict food. This made me wonder how this will affect the convict and Pip in future chapters.

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  17. emilyr6

    Throughout the first six chapters of the novel, Great Expectations, the readers are introduced to a variety of extremely complex and interesting characters, but the character that I found to be the most intriguing was Mrs. Joe Gargery, Pips caretaker, older sister and only living relative. She is a very tough and no nonsense women who is in charge of their household. At first glance it may seem like Mrs. Joe does not care about Pip’s well-being at all. On page twenty-seven, as Mrs. Joe is complaining about Pip, he thinks to himself, “And then (she) entered on a fearful catalogue of all the illnesses I had been guilty of, and all of the acts of sleeplessness I had committed, and all the high places I had tumbled from, and all the low places I had tumbled into, and all the injuries I had done myself, and all the times she had wished me in my grave, and I had contumaciously refused to go there.” It seems that Mrs. Joe believes that Pip it nothing more than a nuisance that refuses to leave her alone. She constantly complains that about him being around and most of the time she acts like she would rather that he was dead, because he makes her life miserable. Furthermore, she makes Pip feel like all of the problems of her life are because that he was born and that his being alive is all his fault. However, underneath this hard shell Mrs. Joe actually cares about Pip. On page nine Mrs. Joe says, “Where have you been young monkey?… Tell me directly what you’ve been doing to wear me away with fear and fright and worrit”. In contrast to how she regularly treats Pip, deep down Mrs. Joe actually cares about him and she would be destroyed if anything was to ever happen to him. As a result of these small shows of affection, the reader can come to the conclusion that whenever Mrs. Joe acts like she detests Pip, she is actually just putting on a show since she does not know how to express how she really feels. To end, once you get past her cold aura, Mrs. Joe cares about Pip.

    Reply
    1. Zoe

      She definitely isn’t a character to love but she is interesting to think about. Like you said, she thinks of him a a nuisance, but it’s weird to think about why she would want her won brother to be dead when he’s the only family left. I do think she cares about Pip, however she might just be new to parenting and think it’s the right way to do things. I agree that Mrs.Joe would be horribly sad if anything happened to him.

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  18. Zoe

    When I read the first 6 chapters of Great Expectations by Charles Dickens the character Mr.Joe Gargery stood out to me. When you first meet him you see how Pip and Joe relate to each other because of Mrs.Joe. She wasn’t very nice to either of them so Joe always tried to make him fell better. During chapter 4 when all the adults were attacking Pip at the party, Joe tried to communicate that he was here for Pip by giving him more Gravy. This made Joe a sort of father figure for Pip however it also gave Pip a friend because Joe also played games with him. In chapter 2, you can see that he usually plays a game with Pip with their bread. Mr.Joe Gargery definitely makes a good relationship between him and Pip which creates a character to enjoy reading about.

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    1. janem

      I agree with you Zoe, I definitely think that Joe’s small acts of kindness and attempt to help Pip feel better makes him a father figure to Pip. It is interesting to wonder about Joe, how he got into the place he’s in now, and to wonder what will become of him later in the novel. Good job on your response.

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  19. johnh1

    While reading great expectations a specific character I took note of Was Pip’s sister, Mrs. Joe Gargery. I took note of her as she was an early character with a very distinct personality. This personality, of course being that she is awful to people and conceited. Chapter two is when I started to see how awful this woman was. In page nine she says “It’s bad enough to be a blacksmith’s wife (and him a gargery) without being your mother” In some points I cannot argue with her saying of this. After all, Pip was being disobedient but something I can argue with is how she treats Joe. She says “It’s bad enough being a blacksmith’s wife…” Joe simply didn’t deserve to be treated this way she throws an insult at him for seemingly no reason. One could say that she was just worried about Pip and while that may be true I would suggest something completely different. I think she is just vain and believes she deserves more from life than to deal with him but keeps him around as something to let her anger out on. “‘Churchyard!’ repeated my sister ‘If it warn’t for me you’d have been to the churchyard long ago, and stayed there. Who brought you up by hand?'” this line is from page nine as well. If you examine this line you will notice two things. The first is that she doesn’t care what happened at the churchyard or why he was there and the second is that she throws in at the end “who brought you up by hand?”. The first thing is important because it shows how little she cares. She doesn’t really ask because she just wants to get her rage out. If she did care truly she would have asked what happened to look out for his safety. The second thing I noticed is arguably more important. At the end of her line she asks Pip “who brought you up by hand?”. This sentence shows that she believes that she deserves recognition for what she has done. Asking for recognition like this shows the selfishness and vanity I believe she has. I don’t know for sure but my first impression of her leaves me with this idea.

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  20. Emma Garbowitz

    After reading the first six chapters of Great Expectations by Charles Dickens, one specific character stood out to me very much. The character Mrs. Joe Gargery stood out to me for so many different reasons. Her personality is very strong and the way she presents herself is very interesting. When we first meet Mrs. Joe, she is written as a harsh women with strong thoughts and always speaks her mind. For example, the text states, “I’d never do it again! I know that. I may truly say I’ve never had this apron of mine off, since born you were. It’s bad enough to be a blacksmith’s wife (and him a Gargery) without being your mother.” Instantly you can see how rude and harsh she is, not only to Pip but also her husband. Mrs. Joe has a very unique personality in which she tends to make people feel as though she doesn’t care. For instance, in one specific scene she portrays that Pip is nothing more than a nuisance and a bother. The text states, “I didn’t bring you up by hand to badger people’s lives out. It would be blame to me, and not praise, I had. People are put in the Hulks because they murder and because they rob, and forge, and do all sorts of bad; and they always begin by asking questions. Now you get along to bed!” This shows how just because Pip is asking questions Mrs. Joe became annoyed instantaneously by this and is saying that he will eventually be a criminal when he is grown up unless he stops inquiring. However, although Mrs. Joe is like this at home with just Mr. Joe and Pip, her personality completely changes as soon as company comes over. When company is over she doesn’t yell and isn’t as rude to Pip as she normally would be. The text states, “My sister was uncommonly lively on the present occasion…” Although Pip’s sister did seem happy and cheerful, he saw right through her act. However, even after Mrs. Joe did say all these terrible things, I do still think she really cares about Pip. I think this because the text states, “Tell me directly what you’ve been doing to wear me away with fret and fright and worrit”.This shows that Mrs. Joe definitely does care for Pip even the slightest bit because she is concerned about where he was. Therefore, Mrs. Joe is a very interesting character and I am excited to watch her grow as a character throughout the novel.

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  21. janem

    After reading the first 6 chapters of “Great Expectations” by Charles Dickens, the character Mrs. Joe Gargery interests me. When Dickens first brings up Pip’s sister, I assumed she would be sweet and motherly to Pip. But after reading further into the book, it is revealed that she is quite the opposite. Mrs. Joe is described to be unattractive and bony. She always wears a coarse apron full of pins and needles, which I think can relate to her personality because both are ugly, harsh and hurtful. On page 8 it says, “…and knowing her to have a hard and heavy hand, and to be much in the habit of laying it upon her husband as well as upon me,…”. On page 23 it says, “…and delivered over to her, to be dealt with according to the outraged majesty of the law. I was always treated as if I had insisted on being born, in opposition to the dictates of reason, religion, and morality,…” From these pieces it is evident that Mrs. Joe is physically and emotionally abusive to her family. She acts like Pip has always acted in an obnoxious way when in actuality, he is just a typical child learning and growing. The reason Mrs. Joe interests me so much is because I wonder why she is so mean to her family. She may have not have wanted to raise a child, but the least she could do is recognize that it is neither Pip nor her husband’s fault that Pip was born and their parents passed. Because she is so cruel to Pip, I wonder if he will try to leave the house as soon as he can, or if one night he will just decide to leave and try to live on his own. I also wonder what obstacle Mrs. Joe will become for Pip as the story continues.

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  22. Madison Lusk

    While reading the first six chapters of “Great Expectations” by Charles Dickens, the character that I found the most intriguing was Mrs. Joe Gargery. Throughout what I’ve read so far, Mrs. Joe has been strict and always seemed to be on Pips case. She is interesting because she never takes off her apron, and I always wonder why. Also, she seems very controlling to Pip as well as her husband, Joe Gargery. Since she is Pips sister, I would expect her to be kind to him, but instead she gives lots of rules and harsh punishments. I feel like there may have been something that happened in Mrs. Joe’s past that makes her act this way. Pip says that Mrs. Joe Gargery “had established a reputation with herself and the neighbours” because she brought him up “by hand.” I wonder if that means the neighbours agree with her parenting approach or not. It is also interesting how she doesn’t want Pip, but still brought him up in a strict manner. I would expect someone who didn’t want to raise a child to have lazy parenting skills, but the text states, “If it warn’t for me, you’d have been to the churchyard long ago, and stayed there. Who brought you up by hand?” All in all, Mrs. Joe Gargery is a very interesting character and I can’t wait to find out what she does next.

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    1. Hannah McKiverkin

      I agree that Mrs.Joe Gargery is very strict and controlling especially when it comes to Pip. Before Pips encounter with her I thought she was going to be nice as well, but I was wrong. I think she should be nicer and more friendly with Pip. I also agree that she has harsh punishments towards Pip. I loved this! Good job!

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  23. Brishti Sarkar

    As I read Great Expectations, I found that one of the most interesting characters so far is the unnamed convict that Pip meets in the graveyard. We first meet him while Pip is in the graveyard, staring at the tombstones of his parents, and then the convict seizes Pip and demands him to bring him food and a file to cut away his iron legs. In this scene, he is shown to be frightening. “You fail, or you go from my words in any partickler, no matter how small it is, and your heart and your liver shall be torn out, roasted and ate.”(p.6). The next we see of him is the following morning after Pip had successfully snatched food and a file from his sister, Mrs. Joe Gargery, and her husband, Mr. Joe Gargery. Now, the convict seems more sane, as he accepts the food, but quickly goes back to being threatening when Pip mentions that he saw another convict. “He held me by the collar and stared at me so, that I began to think his first idea about cutting my throat had revived.”(p.20). This is the last time we see him until that night, when the policemen have come to their house to have Mr. Joe fix their handcuffs. After Mr. Joe has repaired them, they agree to help to find the two escaped convicts. The two convicts are fighting each other in the marsh, one of them being Pip’s convict, and the other being the one Pip saw that morning. When they are captured, Pip’s convict surprisingly protects Pip, saying instead that he was the one who stole the food and file. “I took some wittels, up at the willage over yonder…From the blacksmith’s”(p.39-40) The main thing that intrigues me the most about his character is that he keeps the reader asking questions about his actions and what might he do next. When we see him first, we do not know who he is or what he did, the second time, we are kept wondering what he might do with the information or why he was so threatening, and finally, we wonder why he would protect Pip and lie, and when we might see him return next. I feel as though this character is interesting and complex, and I cannot wait to see how his character will be developed further.

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  24. Casey

    The character who had the biggest impression on me so far in the book, was Mrs. Joe Gargery. She is Pip’s older sister, only living family member, and Joe Gargery’s wife. I was very fascinated by her because of how cruel she is to her little brother Pip. In the second chapter when Pip is describing her, he doesn’t mention a single decent thing about her. He describes her as “not a good-looking woman,” and “she must have made Joe Gargery marry her by hand.” (p.8). This shows that Pip thinks poorly of his sister. Being Pip’s only family, I thought Mrs. Joe Gargery would more of a motherly figure towards Pip, but I was proven wrong, again, when Pip wasn’t eating his food and her reaction was to “dive at me, and fished me up by the hair: saying nothing more than awful words, ‘You come along with me and be dosed.'”(p. 12) She then pours tar-water down Pip’s throat. Mrs. Joe Gargery’s personality adds an unexpected turn in the book and and makes it interesting to read. It makes me wonder how their relationship will evolve throughout the story.

    Reply
    1. josepha4

      I wonder if she will develop more maternal feelings toward Pip as the story progresses and we get to see deeper into the character.

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  25. josepha4

    After i finished reading Great Expectations one character who stood out to me was Mrs. Joe Gargery. I think she stood out to me because of her inability to show compassion. She is constantly undermining he husband for no reason and scolds Pip whenever she gets the chance. In fact, i think, that she enjoys to scold Pip and use him as something to get her anger out on. She uses Pip as an answer to when things go bad in her life. This also took me by surprise, if you only had one living family member left you would love them and treat them with proper respect as human being. Instead she constantly congratulates herself by telling Pip about how bad off he would have been if she didn’t take him in,showing another undesirable trait, to much self appreciation. For example,” If it waren’t for me you’ have been to the churchyard long ago, and stayed there” implying he would have died long ago. I’m interested to know if Mrs. Joe’s personality will have any affect on other character’s personality

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  26. Hannah McKiverkin

    While reading chapters one to six of the book titled, Great Expectations I was most intrigued by Mr.Joe Gargery who is a black smith and is married to Mrs.Joe Gargery, Pip’s older sister. He intrigued me the most because of how nicely he treated Pip. Joe and Pip had a great connection from chapter one partially because of how Mrs.Joe treated both of them and also because of Joe’s foolish, child-like personality. They always have games to play with each other and also make dinner-time fun. For example, “In our already-mentioned freemasonry as fellow suffers, and in his good-natured companionship with me, it was our evening habit to compare the way we bit through our slices, by silently holding them up to each other’s admiration now and then- which stimulated to new exertions.”(pg.11) Mr.Joe Gargery is also protective with especially when it comes to fights with Mrs.Joe Gargery. When Pips relatives were over for dinner Pip was caught in some pretty uncomfortable situation. Mr.Joe Gargery always makes Pip feel more comfortable at the dinner table when in those situations. For instance, “But he always comforted me when he could,in some way of his own, and he did so at dinner-time by giving me gravy…”(pg.26) These first six chapters were definitely exciting and I learned about a little bit about each of the characters and I’m so excited to read more and learn more about them, but especially Mr.Joe Gargery!

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