We are lonesome animals. (OMM #6)

33 thoughts on “We are lonesome animals. (OMM #6)

  1. “We are lonesome animals. We spend all our life trying to be less lonesome. One of our ancient methods is to tell a story begging the listener to say — and to feel — ‘Yes, that’s the way it is, or at least that’s the way I feel it. You’re not as alone as you thought.’”

    This quote is telling us that all humans are lonely, but that we don’t want to be, therefore, we spend our lives looking for someone that stops the loneliness. We like to make each other feel better by telling stories that make us feel like we are not the only ones in the world that are lonely. This quote applies to Of Mice and Men. When George was telling Lennie about the farm, he started off with saying, “Guys like us, that work on ranches, are the loneliest guys in the world.”(pg. 13) This is similar to how Steinbeck started the quote that we are analyzing now. The men that work on the ranches are indeed very lonely. They only work for themselves, and that was why they were so surprised when George and Lennie were friends and protected each other. It was very uncommon that a worker would have a partner that he would care for. Loneliness was not something that George and Lennie were familiar with because they had each other. The part of Steinbeck’s quote that stated that we like to tell stories that begins with the listener saying/feeling, “Yes, that’s the way it is…” This is true, seeing as how George started his story with exactly that. And although technically, he and Lennie and not alone since they have each other, they feel like they are.

    • Great reponse Arina. I also think the relationship between George and Lennie is unique. Compared to the rest of the ranch, they are the only ones with somebody else.

  2. When speaking, George Steinbeck once said:

    “We are lonesome animals. We spend all our life trying to be less lonesome. One of our ancient methods is to tell a story begging the listener to say — and to feel — ‘Yes, that’s the way it is, or at least that’s the way I feel it. You’re not as alone as you thought.’”

    We see here that George Steinbeck sees storytelling as a tradition. He sees it as a common bond among humans, that allows us to relate to one another. Storytelling is meant to feel good, and Steinbeck to some extent does this-however in the end he breaks his own rule in Of Mice and Men. Take, for instance, George and Lennie, who are basically brothers. Although not always shown, they do love each other. Yet at the end, “George raised the gun and steadied it, and he brought the muzzle of it close to the back of Lennie’s head. The hand shook violently, but his face set and his hand steadied. He pulled the trigger.” (page 106). Lennie is a kind soul, yet George barely hesitates before pulling the trigger on his once friend. In a way, this leaves the reader feeling horrified because Steinbeck instantly kills off a beloved character and then ends the novel. Even when Steinbeck says, “Yes that’s the way it is, or at least that’s the way I feel it,” in his quote, he is false. Look at our class alone. For the past couple of weeks, all we have done is debate and circle back and look at topics in this book and argue. Often we reach a consensus, but we have no idea if it’s right or not. People don’t agree on this book, and that’s one of the things that makes us like it. Much like the novel, I’m sure this quote will lead to an interesting debate that I look forward to discussing more in-depth in class.

  3. “We are lonesome animals. We spend all our life trying to be less lonesome. One of our ancient methods is to tell a story begging the listener to say — and to feel — ‘Yes, that’s the way it is, or at least that’s the way I feel it. You’re not as alone as you thought.’”

    This quote is very interesting. Brotherhood and companionship is very important in Of Mice and Men, as George and Lennie have an extraordinary relationship. Steinbeck is basically saying that everyone is lonely. We spend our lives searching for people, and trying to figure out if they are lonely too. Life is full of loneliness, and everyone experiences it. I think that this quote certainly relates to Of Mice and Men. It seems like George and Lennie are the only one that are with a companion, everyone else is lonely. They work, and that is basically all they do. It is a pretty depressing idea, but everyone is lonely. At the end of the novella, George too is left lonely, with Lennie killed. Steinbeck says that storytelling is a way for people to come together and get rid of their loneliness. Even in the ancient times, storytelling was a way for people to find common feelings (one common feeling being loneliness). I think that finding a companion is most people’s goal in life. This is mainly because no one wants to feel lonely, and Steinbeck says that all people are lonely. Crooks is an African-American man, so he is isolated from the rest of the workers and people on the farm. He says that loneliness is a bad feeling, and I think most will agree with him.

    • Great job! I like how you talked a bit about how brotherhood is important in this novella. Without others we wouldn’t be able to experience brotherhood. Keep up the great work!

  4. John Steinbeck once stated:

    “We are lonesome animals. We spend all our life trying to be less lonesome. One of our ancient methods is to tell a story begging the listener to say — and to feel — “Yes, that’s the way it is, or at least that’s the way I feel it. You’re not as alone as you thought.”

    Steinbeck is saying that everyone is lonesome while spending their whole lives trying to be less lonesome. To prevent loneliness, we tell stories to connect with others. This idea is very interesting, and can very well be true. Steinbeck’s statement is and is not evident in his text of Of Mice and Men. In the novella, George and Lennie act as brothers towards each other in a close friendship, which is rare in Soledad. This companionship left both George and Lennie with someone that they could (or thought they could) trust. This trust and friendship are immediately demolished when George pulled the trigger on Lennie’s head when he’s faced the other way. The loneliness is seen by primarily Crooks, who is isolated from everyone else. However, without George Lennie would be lonely as well, and vice versa. In addition, there are many debatable aspects of this story which don’t exactly agree with Steinbeck’s statement. For example, not everyone agrees with everything that someone might say or do. Therefore, there are many interesting aspects of Steinbeck’s quote that do and do not relate to his novella.

  5. “We are lonesome animals. We spend all our life trying to be less lonesome. One of our ancient methods is to tell a story begging the listener to say — and to feel — ‘Yes, that’s the way it is, or at least that’s the way I feel it. You’re not as alone as you thought.’” – John Steinbeck

    In the quote above From John Steinbeck speaks about the feeling of being alone or having to live alone. He explains how humans and animals are born everyday into this world and although they have families and mothers, they are essentially alone. In life, it is our decision to find friends and family and to make friendships or relationships with people that we enjoy being around or feel like we want to have it our lives. animals do a similar kind of thing now they don’t pick and choose who they hang out with or find someone who plays soccer just like them to be friends with but they do have certain kinds of other animals to be with and live around feeling less lonely. Most of us have mothers and fathers and maybe even siblings and living in the same house as them every day makes us feel as though we are a little less alone, we have friends that we go see everyday at school or even a pet to make us feel as though we have more meaning in our life. Writers only write a good book if the static or main character has a best friend or a group of friends or someone like a Mom by his/her side. People read books to feel as though they are less alone and it’s something that we all do and I daily lives. we get tired of being alone or with ourselves for too long that we find someone to go talk to or text, or we read a book that helps us feel as though we are on an adventure with the people in the book and doing the same things that they are. hear John Steinbeck is saying that books create another world for you something else to go and turn to when you need to feel closer to home, we read books to be transported to a far-off land with other people if we don’t like the ones around us. Stories are written for people to identify with and whether the characters have friends or are alone we identify either way. The magic of books is something the authors have been trying to master for years now, and I think that Steinbeck did this in his novella. We go through seeing characters like crooks who are all alone, to candy and his dog or George and Lennie who have each other. There are all different kinds of people in this world some people are alone, some who have a little and some who have someone. He taught us that in Of Mice and Men.

  6. “We are lonesome animals. We spend all our life trying to be less lonesome. One of our ancient methods is to tell a story begging the listener to say — and to feel — “Yes, that’s the way it is, or at least that’s the way I feel it. You’re not as alone as you thought.”

    In the above quote, Steinbeck tells us about common sentiments we feel as humans. He expresses that humans are lonesome, and spend their entire life attempting to relieve our loneliness. But we have always used the method of writing stories, endeavoring to help us relate to each other. Once we have realized that others feel the same way, we realize that we aren’t really alone after all. Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men exactly portrays his point of view. George and Lennie are two friends in a world of men without anybody else. They stand out, while everyone else in the story is isolated. Similar to the storytelling, George and Lennie tell other ranchers about the story they wish to live; their dream of owning a farm. At first, the other men refuse to believe in their petty dream. But soon, they realize that they feel the same way. Those lonely men now know something others have in common. They realize they aren’t as lonely as they had thought. Just like how man can become less lonely by telling stories that allow us to relate to others, George and Lennie’s dreams allow the ranchers to relate to a common desire, owning a farm and living off the fat of the land.

  7. We are lonesome animals. We spend all our life trying to be less lonesome. One of our ancient methods is to tell a story begging the listener to say — and to feel — “Yes, that’s the way it is, or at least that’s the way I feel it. You’re not as alone as you thought.”

    The quote states that humans are naturally lonely. But, humans do not want to be lonely, and spend their whole lives and all of their resources in order to find other people so they do not have to be lonely. Humans do this by telling other people about their stories, troubles and problems. Then, they would like this person, or people that they are conversing with to fully understand their issue and feel the same way. So many people keep in their thoughts and their issues and try to deal with it themselves. This is because they are afraid, or they know that if they try to seek advice and try to get another person to understand what they are going through, that person just will not understand. Most people will never understand what you specifically are experiencing in your life, for the simple reason that they are not you. It is impossible to truly be in somebody else’s shoes, so most people give a generic answer to somebody seeking their help, which does not offer much guidance. This is what Steinbeck is talking about in his quote. He is saying that humans try all their lives to get someone to understand them. This rarely happens, but it does in Of Mice and Men. While Lennie might not understand George’s problems, or even understand his own problems, George fully understands his. George knows what to do and say with Lennie at all times, whether to criticize him or to be kind to him. George is one of these rare people who is able to truly understand another person.

  8. The author John Steinbeck said:
    “We are lonesome animals. We spend all our life trying to be less lonesome. One of our ancient methods is to tell a story begging the listener to say — and to feel — ‘Yes, that’s the way it is, or at least that’s the way I feel it. You’re not as alone as you thought.’”

    In this quote Steinbeck is saying that we are all lonely humans who are just animals. However, we waste so much time trying to be less lonely by telling stories that can help us interact in a better way. This is just how it is and it’s not just you. This relates to the novella Of Mice and Men because all the characters are alone. If you think about it, the only people together are George and Lennie, and Curley and his wife. However these people only have one friend and in Curley and his wife’s case, they are barely seen together. This makes them lonely. Also, lets not forget how lonely George is when Lennie dies. Taking a deeper look into Lennie and George’s friendship, they keep talking about a farm in their future. It seems to me this is the story that Steinbeck is talking about. Afterall, the farm story is placed in random places where there is barely anything to talk about. Also, this story is unrealistic yet they keep coming back to it just as if it is something they can relate on. Why do us humans talk about these weird stories? Is it so we have something we can relate to others to? If so, then George and Lennie are following Steinbeck’s quote. Although this might be a stretch, I think that debates are the one story that we argue about and speak about what we think is important. Maybe this is why we are having this conversation right before our debate. Maybe in debates we are saying our own opinions are trying others to agree with us, which is what Steinbeck said about picking at stories for others to agree with.

  9. I think this quote is definitely seen throughout this novella. The idea of humans always searching for something else is quite interesting. Sometimes we all feel that we just want something else in life, and more often than not a strong relationship is what we need. All the men, and even Curley’s wife desire more, it is just human nature. Slim is always telling George that his relationship with Lennie is very different because they actually care for each other. “We are lonesome animals. We spend all our life trying to be less lonesome.” Things like marriage, dating, friendship, and more are all about two people feeling a connection. That is what humans have searched for since the beginning of time. Of course cavemen didn’t go out searching for wives, but they searched for someone to help them hunt or even reproduce. Lennie and George depend on each other, which is why Lennie was so lost when George was away (on a side note I feel like we have never discussed if George was wrong for leaving Lennie or if he deserved his space). I know we are debating about capital punishment in our next unit and maybe this quote would be worth analyzing in that sense. After all, Of Mice and Men does have similar ideas and topics that we will most likely discuss in our next unit, and I am very excited.

  10. “We are lonesome animals. We spend all our life trying to be less lonesome. One of our ancient methods is to tell a story begging the listener to say — and to feel — ‘Yes, that’s the way it is, or at least that’s the way I feel it. You’re not as alone as you thought.’”

    I think that Steinbeck is making a commentary on the strength of George and Lennie’s bond. I think that the story is referring to the fantasy of the farm the two men share. They both agree on what an ideal life would be. They have each other and they are not lonely, all the other men on the ranch are lonely and for the most part not very happy. Crooks for example, wishes had any one to make him less lonely which only makes him feel more alone. In Steinbecks opinion, companionship will bring you happiness, but the longer you look for it the sadder you will become. He doesn’t believe you can achieve true contentment alone. He is breaking the trope of real men having to alone and not having friends they are very close with. Steinbeck thinks it’s essential to have a friend you are very close to. When Steinbeck says,” ‘Yes, that’s the way it is, or at least that’s the way I feel it. You’re not as alone as you thought.’” I don’t think Steinbeck believes friends have to agree on everything but more reach an understanding with each other. Where they can comprehend how the other person feels and how they think.
    Friends with very deep bonds almost seem to share a brain, in Steinbecks opinion. Like how George always seems to know how to guide and help Lennie when Lennie needs him. Lennie doesn’t even need to say anything for George to understand what he needs and what will ease his distress. George is a real friend to Lennie, and the perfect kind of friend to Lennie. He never judges and he always is ready to be at his aid. Lennie needs a companion, more than most and George always offers that to him.
    Steinbeck really emphasizes what it not only means to be a friend but the value a friend has to us.

  11. “We are lonesome animals. We spend all our life trying to be less lonesome. One of our ancient methods is to tell a story begging the listener to say — and to feel — “Yes, that’s the way it is, or at least that’s the way I feel it. You’re not as alone as you thought.”

    This quote from John Steinbeck is explaining what he thinks life is, and how he thinks people deal with life. John Steinbeck sees human life as lonely. He says that everybody is lonely, and they try to make themselves less lonely by telling stories to others abut how they are not lonely. I believe that Steinbeck is saying that the world is so occupied trying to fir in, that they don’t have the time to be themselves. I got this idea from this quote because Steinbeck says that the teller begs the listener to say that they can relate to the story, and therefore, make the teller less lonely because they have someone that they can relate to and feels the same way. The problem about telling these stories, is that because you are trying so hard to fir in and have the listener accept you, then you never tell anybody about you other stories that may not be accepted. By living life like this, you teach yourself to not find out who you really are, and just fall into the same category as everyone else. Now, this may not be a bad thing, many people who showed that they were different, and didn’t want to be placed in the same few categories ass everyone else have suffered a lot. Many have been killed, others have been threatened, and some, you never hear of because they are just pushed away by society. But it is these same people that know they are more then just “average”, or “regular” that end being the greats of our world. Like Albert Einstein, Martin Luther King Jr., Plato, Socrates, Aristotle. They are all people who knew that they were different, and did something about it instead of just allowing the world to suck them in and devour everything that makes them special.

    i find it interesting that John Steinbeck said,
    “We are lonesome animals. We spend all our life trying to be less lonesome. One of our ancient methods is to tell a story begging the listener to say — and to feel — “Yes, that’s the way it is, or at least that’s the way I feel it. You’re not as alone as you thought.”
    But he has also been quoted saying, “No man really knows about other human beings. The best he can do is to suppose the are like himself.”

    I know that we are moving on to our next subject soon, but interesting class conversation maybe?
    This could also possibly be used in our arguments about the capital punishment.
    Another quote from Steinbeck that I thought was interesting is, “When two people meet, each one is changed by the other so you have two new people.” (word choice, one instead of person?)

    • I really like the idea of how a person would try harder to fit in and “tell the same story,” just so they can fit in. I also really like the other Steinbeck quotes you found! Great blog, Remy!

    • Realized that I didn’t complete the task, continued…………..

      This quote can definitively be used in context with Of Mice and Men. In the quote, Steinbeck talks about loneliness, and how everybody is lonely. And they are constantly trying to convince themselves and others that they aren’t lonely. This is a lot like George and Lennie’s relationship. George and Lennie are the only happy pair on the ranch. Everybody else is either alone, or doesn’t want to be together. George says that he takes care of Lennie because Aunt Clara said to, but we all know that he really actually cares deeply about Lennie. This can be seen exceptionally well in the ending. I know that some of you may be thinking, Remy you’re insane, George shot Lennie, how could George care about Lennie so much if he killed him? Well, I believe that George believes that it was the right thing to do. George knew that if he hadn’t been the one to let go of Lennie, then Lennie would have suffered much more then he did. And not only did George make sure that Lennie’s death was quick and clean, but he dulled the pain first by having Lennie picture the farm and rabbits. George was sending Lennie off to a better place. And it wasn’t an easy decision for George either, he had to convince himself that hat he was doing was right, and that it was what they all needed, not just Lennie.

  12. The quotation above talks about how every person can feel lonely. As humans, we all want to feel that we are not alone. John Steinbeck brings up an old method that all people have used to explain how humans overcome there loneliness. That method is to talk to someone about your own feeling and ideas, and to listen to that person’s feedback. Steinbeck says that when we talk to a person, we want that person to tell us that we are right and that the whole world is on our side, or that at least that one person agrees with us. Steinbeck’s quotation on loneliness reminds me of a more mental looniness, rather than physically being isolated. Steinbeck wants to convey that people do not want to know when they are wrong, because then that person will feel as though the whole world is against them. Even if only one person agrees with them, that person will feel okay. In Of Mice and Men, We see physical isolation with Crooks in the stable, and mental isolation with Lennie being the only man on the farm with a mental disability. We can see Lennie feeling safe with George and having a guide with George, so in that sense he isn’t lonely. Also, some of the the most important parts of the novella happen discreetly, and isolated. Crooks, Candy and Lennie talk about the dream ranch in Crooks’ little shack, and Lennie is killed privately in the woods. But the clearest part of the novella where we see unity in the minds of the farmers is when they all talk about the dream ranch. It is like the quotation where it says that we tell a story and hope for the reader to agree. This was a quick blog, but still something very interesting to think about.

  13. We are lonesome animals. We spend all our life trying to be less lonesome. One of our ancient methods is to tell a story begging the listener to say — and to feel — “Yes, that’s the way it is, or at least that’s the way I feel it. You’re not as alone as you thought.”- John Steinbeck

    John Steinbeck, as a great author, has influenced the lives of many through impactful books and novellas. Through this quote, he explains to his reading audience, what makes us, human. One day in class, we had a discussion question, led by Ms. Quinson: what makes us human? John Steinbeck answers this question very clearly. He says loneliness. He explains how we spend all our lives looking for family or even “the one” so we could be less lonely. This is clearly exhibited in Of Mice and Men. George and Lennie are the odd ones out because they have each other. Like Slim said, “Funny how you an’ him string along together.” It was Slim’s calm invitation to confidence.” (pg. 39) Everyone else on the ranch has their disability and they have no one with them or for them. They have to experience this miserable and dreadful life alone. In one instance, Candy had his dog, his one companion; however, reality interfered and took his dog’s life. Through these quotes, John Steinbeck teaches us important life lessons, as well as the truth about us, as humans.

  14. We are lonesome animals. We spend all our life trying to be less lonesome. One of our ancient methods is to tell a story begging the listener to say — and to feel — “Yes, that’s the way it is, or at least that’s the way I feel it. You’re not as alone as you thought.”

    This quote talks about humans feeling lonely, and telling stories to connect with people. We definitely see this idea portrayed in “Of Mice and Men”. One way that George and Lennie connect is through this dream that they share of having a farm. Lennie always asks George to tell him about what their farm will be like. This isn’t exactly like the quote. In the quote one person tells the stories willingly in order to get the other to stay. In “Of Mice and Men” Lennie asks George to tell the story. This brought me back to the idea that George and Lennie together make one perfect person. George has the brains, Lennie has the strength, George has the strictness, Lennie has the love. Together George and Lennie balance out to be one perfect person. Maybe having the quote refer to one person, Steinbeck is trying to show how George and Lennie should be unified rather than separated.

  15. “We are lonesome animals. We spend all our life trying to be less lonesome. One of our ancient methods is to tell a story begging the listener to say — and to feel — “Yes, that’s the way it is, or at least that’s the way I feel it. You’re not as alone as you thought.”

    To summarize it, Steinbeck meant that we are all lonely, and we try to be less alone by finding people who understand you. I find this quote interesting, because it really makes you think of the true meaning of any kind of relationship. At first, you’d think that you’re never alone, with friends and family, but you really aren’t if you don’t have anyone who really understands you and cares for you. As to the question whether this is put into effect in the book, the answer is yes and no. George, Lennie, Candy, and Crooks are good examples to support the quote. George and Lennie travel everywhere together. They both needed each other. Candy was attached with his dog. He was reluctant to say goodbye to his beloved companion. Crooks told his story to Lennie, hoping that he could also get a friend. There are many examples of people wanting to be less lonely, but there are also some instances that opposes that. All the men seemed to always look at the two men strangely. Apparently, they seemed it strange that not only did they want to work, but they also thought it odd for two men travelling together. I find this odd, especially when Slim questioned it.

  16. We are lonesome animals. We spend all our life trying to be less lonesome. One of our ancient methods is to tell a story begging the listener to say — and to feel — “Yes, that’s the way it is, or at least that’s the way I feel it. You’re not as alone as you thought.”

    I, as one of my everyday strategies for conversations and making friends, have a tendency to think about what I and a person may have in common with each other, and, using that common factor, state what would be an apparent common belief between us. This strategy helps me find people I would get along with and to start conversations. I see a major part of the theme of OMM to be this statement, this Idea of an effort for one to be less solitary within each of our lives. The first time I read the quote, I misread the end. Still tired from waking up, I had believed that Steinbeck was speaking to the reader directly when he said: “You’re not as alone as you thought.” I was under the belief that he was doing the very thing he was speaking of, almost asking the reader “Don’t you do this too?” As well as this Idea inside of the quote, I got to thinking about something; Which came first?: The chicken or the egg? After browsing the internet for a few minutes, I found that the quote was published in “In Awe of Words”, in a newspaper called The Exonian. I also found that this quote was published SEVEN YEARS before OMM was originally published. This means that one of the book’s central themes is definitely based off of this quote, as it seems to me a large part of this story is solitude.

  17. We are lonesome animals. We spend all our life trying to be less lonesome. One of our ancient methods is to tell a story begging the listener to say — and to feel — “Yes, that’s the way it is, or at least that’s the way I feel it. You’re not as alone as you thought.”
    This quote is telling us that everyone starts out lonely. It is shown as a human trait that we can never lose, but yet we still always want to find someone to relate with no matter how small the matter is. Steinbeck is telling us that storytelling is his way finding people who relate with him or think the same as him. He doesn’t just see it as a fun hobby, but also as a coping mechanism to deal with his lonesomeness. He just wants one person to relate to his stories so that he doesn’t have to be alone with his thoughts. George and Lennie manage to show this representation of lonesomeness even though we don’t see it with them. They were shown to always be by each other’s side no matter what and everyone else was just alone. Steinbeck wants the social aspect of George and Lennie’s life. He doesn’t want to be alone.

  18. The quote above is a very meaningful quote from Steinbeck that characterizes him. Often times, I find people quote famous theoretical physicists on human emotions. To me, that makes no sense. In the quote above, though, it pronounces one of the many underlying themes seen throughout his writing. Specifically, this quote is about how Homo sapiens as a species are very social. This means that we tend to be lonely without others to care for or be taken care of. As a way of warding off this loneliness, we tend to tell stories in order to have people to sympathise with us. In Of Mice and Men, this idea is especially pronounced. Right from the start, we see themes of loneliness playing a role over Lennie, Crooks, and Curley’s wife. Lennie would be scared senseless and lonelier than anyone if George left him for good. Crooks is a negro who is forced to live separately from all the field hands, and says he gets mighty lonesome. To get Lennie to sympathise with his loneliness, Crooks starts telling stories of what would happen to Lennie if George at that moment left him. This does not go over well with Lennie, and almost gets into a fight, until Crooks calms him down. The next attempt is when Curley’s wife, who is forced to talk only to Curley, starts telling Lennie of her own loneliness. She has a little difficulty getting him to listen, as George told Lennie not to, but she gets her way eventually. She starts telling Lennie of how Lonely she herself gets, and tells stories of how she could of been a famous actress. Lennie doesn’t have any event like that to sympathise to, so he tells her stories of how he’s going to have his own farm with rabbits on it. Curley’s wife gets mad for awhile, but then finally realizes she can indeed sympathise with it. Lennie is trying to get his own heaven, while she believes to have missed out on hers. There are other examples, but this is enough to show that everybody has some loneliness in the Great Depression, and that they try to shake it off with stories. This perfectly reflects the quote above, and can most likely be found in many other books of his.

  19. We are lonesome animals. We spend all our life trying to be less lonesome. One of our ancient methods is to tell a story begging the listener to say — and to feel — “Yes, that’s the way it is, or at least that’s the way I feel it. You’re not as alone as you thought.”—John Steinbeck

    The quote above has a lot to do with loneliness. John Steinbeck is saying that we live our lives searching for friends and hoping for reassurance that we are not alone. This statement is 100% true. Whether it be when we’re scared, hurt, nervous, or a mixture of all three, we need other people. Knowing that you aren’t alone when facing your troubles is one of the most comforting feelings in life. Without having other people to support you throughout your ups and downs, everything can appear to be more difficult than usual. A good comparison would be pushing a car. Having to move the car represents an everyday trouble. However, for one person, it can become an extremely difficult and physically taxing task. For an everyday challenge to be so difficult though, it demonstrates that humans need other people to help them with their struggles. Having multiple people to push the car will ultimately make problems go away faster and with less pain. Steinbeck proves that we spend our lives finding support for ourselves in times of need.

    • I enjoyed reading your blog. I like your analysis on Steinbeck’s quote. I especially like the evidence you used to support the fact that Steinbeck’s quote is true.

  20. We are lonesome animals. We spend all our life trying to be less lonesome. One of our ancient methods is to tell a story begging the listener to say — and to feel — “Yes, that’s the way it is, or at least that’s the way I feel it. You’re not as alone as you thought.”

    The above passage is a quote from John Steinbeck, and just like his novella, it is insightful in many ways. This quote explains one of the most profound human desires. The need for attention and company. George mentions that the difference between him and Lennie, and all the other farm workers are that they have each other. George and Lennie can live better together because now they have another person to watch their back, make money, and give company. In this novella, there is one primary example of someone searching for a partner. Curley’s wife. We know from Lennie’s conversation with her that she has been looking for a partner and the last few attempts were thwarted by her family. Steinbeck’s book isn’t a typical partnership novella. In a typical novella, Steinbeck would end the novella with the characters living happily ever after. Instead, Steinbeck kills off Lennie to show, among other things, that (without company) George lives a sad life like the other farm workers. For more knowledge on this topic, I read an article in Psychology Today. From that article, I learned society expects humans to be with another person. “But, just as surely [as we are meant to be in relationships], we are meant to partake of aloneness.” (Here is the article https://goo.gl/P6eDeg)

  21. quote by John Steinbeck:
    We are lonesome animals. We spend all our life trying to be less lonesome. One of our ancient methods is to tell a story begging the listener to say — and to feel — “Yes, that’s the way it is, or at least that’s the way I feel it. You’re not as alone as you thought.”
    This quote says how we just want other people to relate to. I think Steinbeck himself is one of those people. That’s why he wrote Of Mice and Men. He expressed his views and wanted people to say how he’s right and that they agree with him. This quote is also hypocritical. By saying this he actually wants people to say “yeah your right, we do want that”.

  22. We are lonesome animals. We spend all our life trying to be less lonesome. One of our ancient methods is to tell a story begging the listener to say — and to feel — “Yes, that’s the way it is, or at least that’s the way I feel it. You’re not as alone as you thought.”
    —John Steinbeck

    I believe that this quote reflects some of the most important aspects of Of Mice and Men, first and foremost, companionship. We see that all the characters don’t enjoy being alone, no matter how much they may try to convince themselves otherwise (*ahem* Crooks). George and Lennie both need each other. George needs Lennie because helping Lennie gives George a purpose, and frankly, what would George do without him. Lennie needs George because he needs someone to guide him in the right direction. I mean, George ended up giving Lennie really good advice. He was able to tell Lennie exactly who to stay away from, and had Lennie succeeded, they would’ve lived a prosperous life, first at the ranch with Slim and Curley then on their own ranch (with Candy). Candy seeks companionship in his dog, who he recently lost. To make up for his loss, he seeks solace in George and Lennie, and the dream that they share. Crooks, no matter how much he may hate the concept, wants a friend. He convinces himself that being alone is better for him, but he only thinks that because he’s been neglected for so long. Curley’s wife is locked in an unhappy marriage, and wants to find someone who she can talk to, even if that person is Lennie.

  23. “We are lonesome animals. We spend all our life trying to be less lonesome. One of our ancient methods is to tell a story begging the listener to say — and to feel — “Yes, that’s the way it is, or at least that’s the way I feel it. You’re not as alone as you thought.”

    This quote itself shows that humans have animalistic tendencies. We are born into a family unit, but as we grow, and develop, our roles in society change, and we become more solitary. By creating a world of stories, a realm of make-believe, we fill that void of loneliness with a new type of warmth. A warmth you can share with other people, which fills the void in the human soul, that keeps our hopefulness up to have a future. A future were this loneliness will be filled with another hopeful human.

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