Fare thee well, nymph. (MND#3)

Tonight, please finish reading Act II, scene i of A Midsummer Night’s Dream.  Then, examine Helena’s statement below:

Your wrongs do set a scandal upon my sex.
We cannot fight for love as men may do.
We should be wooed and were not made to woo. (2.1.247-249)
 

What is her claim?  What specific evidence does she give in this scene?  Do you agree with her? Why or why not?

As always, please follow the rules of standard written English and respond to at least one other comment in this thread.

MND #3

34 thoughts on “Fare thee well, nymph. (MND#3)

  1. In Act II, scene i of A Midsummer Night’s Dream we once again see Helena trying to win over Demetrius. Clearly, her plan of betraying her friend did not work in her favor, as Demetrius still doesn’t like her and makes that evident. Finally, Demetrius is fed up and tells her to leave him alone, to which she replies:

    “Your wrongs do set a scandal upon my sex.
    We cannot fight for love as men may do.
    We should be wooed and were not made to woo” (II. i. 247-249).

    Here, Helena sticks up for herself. She says that he is insulting to the female gender, and then states how women are not the same as men as they can’t flirt with their love, and they were made to be flirted with. This, once again, lends to the idea that Shakespeare was progressive. Helena is very frustrated because she is being bullied by Demetrius, even though she likes him, and he won’t ever get Hermia. As talked about in class, the idea of “owning” a woman was common at the time, and the same way a man can own a woman, he can disown her, too. This is precisely what Demetrius does and causes Helena to lash out. She not only calls Demetrius a bully to her, but to the female sex as a whole. In fact, if we take a look at the other female characters in this play, there seems to be a common motif of rebellious women. First, Hermia goes ahead with marrying Lysander, against her father’s wishes. The latest example is that of Titania. When her husband, Oberon says he wants one of her servants, she is not submissive, instead saying, “But she, being mortal, of that boy did die,/ And for her sake do I rear up her boy,/ And for her sake I will not part with him.” (II. i. 140-142). It is clear that these women are not bowing to the will of their father/love. Overall, this exclamation by Helena reveals the forward thinking ideals of William Shakespeare in this play.

    • Great blog! Shakespeare definitely was progressive especially in the way he wrote female characters. They are rebellious and bold.

    • Great Job, Matt! You provided adequate analysis and information regarding this prompt. Keep up the great work!

  2. Toward the end of Act II scene I Helena says this:
    Your wrongs do set a scandal upon my sex.
    We cannot fight for love as men may do.
    We should be wooed and were not made to woo. (2.1.247-249)
    She is saying this because Demetrius keeps telling her that he doesn’t love her. What she is saying is that Demetrius is doing wrong to all girls because they can’t fight for love like men. And she says men should impress women and not the other way around. I disagree with what she is saying. Maybe Demetrius could have done a nicer rejection of her love but it’s not his fault he doesn’t like her. And also she says how girls aren’t supposed to be the ones to impress the men. This isn’t true in some cases. Also, girls can fight for love. She is contradicting herself because she is fighting for love. She makes a crazy plan to make Demetrius love her. Women don’t usually fight physically for love like men might but they still fight for it.

    • Great job! I agree with you but in the book’s defense, a women chasing after a man was a big step up for the time being. Keep up the great work!

  3. “Your wrongs do set a scandal upon my sex. We cannot fight for love as men may do. We should be wooed and were not made to woo. (2.1.247-249)”

    Helena desperately tries to get Demetrius to fall in love with her again, but he just keeps getting further and further away from her. Helena and Demetrius are now in the forest, where Demetrius is trying to find Lysander and Hermia and shoot down their plan to escape Athens together. Helena keeps trying to tell Demetrius about her feelings and why he should love her back, but after a while, Demetrius stops tolerating her begging and tells her to go away. This prompts Helena to say the quote above, which states that women do not have the same privliges when it comes to love that men do. Women cannot play around with their lovers and jump around, nor can women easily choose their lover, and instead are forced to marry somebody in most cases. Hermia and Helena both do not follow this, as both are refusing to marry/love who they are supposed to. But, Demetrius is not totally at fault, as it is his choice who he loves. Though his pursuit of Hermia is hopeless, that does not mean he should be forced into loving Helena instead.

  4. In Act II, Scene i of A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare, Helena goes after Demetrius again in an attempt for him to love her. As we know, this doesn’t work and she is once again rejected by Demetrius. Demetrius is focused on Hermia, and is tired of Helena constantly approaching him, saying:

    “Your wrongs do set a scandal upon my sex.
    We cannot fight for love as men may do.
    We should be wooed and were not made to woo. (2.1.247-249)”

    Helena responds to Demetrius’s rejection, by telling him that his behavior is an insult to all women. She also adds that women couldn’t fight for love as men can and that they should be pursued and courted. According to Helena, women weren’t made to do the pursuing. This is not always true for some women go after men. Like Helena.Helena set up a plan in order to pursue Demetrius by telling him of Hermia’s upcoming departure. This is very hypocritical and gives insight towards the character of Helena. Helena is very unlikeable, in my opinion, in these first few scenes of this play. I hope to read more and learn about this story, while also becoming better at interpreting Shakespeare.

  5. In tonights reading of Act II scene i from A Midsummer Night’s Dream, by William Shakespeare, we see progress in the status of women. Unlike today where women in society are doing the same things as men, at the time of this book, women were expected to just wait in a relationship and not fall in love with boys who don’t love you. Although William Shakespeare found a way to mention how women are treated versus how they should be by mentioning:
    “Your wrongs do set a scandal on my sex.
    We cannot fight for love as men may do.
    We should be wooed and were not made to woo.”
    (2.1.247-249)

    In other words:
    Your behavior is an insult to all women.
    We cannot fight for love as men can.
    We shouldn’t be flirting but instead be flirted on

    The character Helena mentioned this and she was trying to show how women should not have to chase after men. This was a very empowering movement for a women during that time because she stood up for herself. However, as a girl reading this from the 21st century, I feel as if Helena could’ve used a better choice of words. She mentioned how every girl can’t flirt with men yet for some reason she is. She is contradicting herself and she doesn’t realize it. Women always ask to be treated fairly but in some cases like this one, she is distinguishing a change between the two sexes which isn’t right. Why is it that women can be sexist and it’s not a big deal but when men say it, it’s the end of the world? Just because I’m a girl it doesn’t mean I can say things that would be rude if men say. Moreover, by saying that women can’t flirt, she is just contradicting herself because if she wants women to have a voice, she can’t have restrictions as what women can do. I say this not only as a problem back then, but one we face today.

  6. Today in class we read act II scene ii of A Midsummer Night’s Dream by Shakespeare, and then re-read it again for home. In this scene Helena says to Demetrius:
    “Your wrongs do set a scandal upon my sex.
    We cannot fight for love as men may do.
    We should be wooed and were not made to woo”
    In this scene and interaction between the two of them, Helena is fighting back against what Demetrius is saying to her and standing up for herself. She talks about how because she is a woman she cannot fight for love in order to just get exactly what she wants like men do. Because she is a woman, she has to be quiet and polite and be obedient of what others tell her to do, even when it comes to her love life. At that time, women were often arranged in marriage by their fathers and had no say in the matter and although the man was involved in the marriage too, he wasn’t considered horrid if he didn’t honor it. A woman was meant to be precious and seen as a property and Helena is sick of being held to that standard or image. She feels that because she is a woman, she can’t take control of her life, specifically the relationship that she is or isn’t in. This conversation, is one that again shows you how modern Shakespeare’s way if thinking and writing was. Not many writers at his time or even after his time would write about heroine women who stood up for themselves, it was just unheard of, but Shakespeare did. He wanted to create characters who highlighted the flaws in society and he did that here, with Helena.

    • Great blog! I love how you related Helena’s small speech here with the fact that Shakespeare is trying to point out the flaws in society. Keep up the good work! 🙂

    • Good job Ryan! I really liked all the things you mentioned in your blog. Especially the fact that women were supposed to sit still, be quiet, and be forced to go on with whatever their parents wanted them to do. I also mentioned a similar idea in my blog about how Shakespeare was advanced for his time and pictured women in a different and special way. Keep up the good work!

  7. In Act II scene I Helena declares that:
    “Your wrongs do set a scandal upon my sex.
    We cannot fight for love as men may do.
    We should be wooed and were not made to woo.”
    What Helena, is saying is that is that women cannot fight over love yet men can. First of all, this makes no sense. Women can just as easily fight for love. Helena did fight for love. Although it was not physically, she attacked Hermia by mocking her, and she is planning on winning back Demetrius with a plan (that will most likely not work). However, she might also be referring to the fact that women cannot play around with their lovers and jump around, nor can women easily choose their lover, and instead are forced to marry somebody in most cases. If this is what she means when she is correct when she says this. Then, Helena says that men should be the ones who love the women, not the other way around. Helena shows her jealousy by saying this because Demetrius already loves Hermia, not Helena, and therefore, Helena is really saying that men should be loving her first, not the other way around. She says that Demetrius is pretty much a representation of how men essentially bully women like Helena by not loving Helena first and not fighting over her. This shows how much Helena loves Demetrius and how much she is trying to get him to love her back once again.

  8. In Act II scene 1, we see more on Helena and her relationship with Demetrius. Her plan to get him back obviously does not work, as he continuously tells her to leave him alone. I truly feel bad for Helena, she constantly is being neglected by the one she loves. However, in this phrase Helena is taking a stand.

    Ay, in the temple, in the town, the field
    You do me mischief. Fie, Demetrius!
    Your wrongs do set a scandal on my sex.
    We cannot fight for love as men may do.
    We should be wooed and were not made to woo.

    Here, Helena takes back to Demetrius, telling him that he is insulting women. Helena does not only stand up for herself, but she is also standing up for women. In a time where male dominated women, Shakespeare constantly writes about female heroines. Helena is saying that women are helpless, and that men are the ones that chooses love, which she thinks is wrong and unfair. She believes that women should be able to love the people they love, instead of men and their fathers repeatedly choosing their spouses. Helena feels like men have control, and that women have no say. She shouldn’t feel the need to chase a man like Demetrius, people should be chasing for her. Women’s rights is still an issue in the world today, and it feels good to think that Shakespeare has been supporting it since the beginning, and was aware of all the issues. Women were always chosen a spouse, like Paris and Juliet, but so Helena feels like she doesn’t have control over her own life. She loves Demetrius, but he ignores her, which triggers her to be angry and really express the issues of women. Helena is a very bold character, and we definitely see it here.

  9. Today we read act II scene i of A Midsummer’s Night Dream. Here, Helena is pursuing Demetrius and is telling him that she will love him no matter what, and Demetrius keeps telling her to go away. He clearly does not like her, and tells her that he gets sick when he looks at her. During their conversation, Helena says the following;

    “Your wrongs do set a scandal upon my sex.
    We cannot fight for love as men may do.
    We should be wooed and were not made to woo. (II.i.247-249)”

    By this, she means that women do not have the same rights as men do. Men get to choose who they marry, while woman have no say in the matter. They are forced to marry whomever it is that chose them, like Hermia is being forced to marry Demetrius. Helena is saying that Demetrius should be the one that is flirting with her and wanting her, while Helena should be the one that all of this attention is directed at. Helena says that women were made to be loved and flirted with, and should not flirt with others. By ignoring her and forcing her to kiss up to him, Demetrius is breaking the laws of how men and women should act. Helena feels as if Demetrius should woo her, while he feels the complete opposite. “‘Tempt not too much the hatred of my spirit, / For I am sick when I do look on thee.’”(II,i,218-219) Helena says that she is like a dog, doing whatever Demetrius wants, and she feels that she should not be doing that. Personally, I do not agree with her. It is not a man’s job to woo over a lady. We saw what happened to Romeo while he was wooing over Rosaline. It is important for both people to gain the love of each other. Also, nowadays, most people are not forced into marriages, so both men and women can fight for their love. In A Midsummer Night’s Dream it is not the case. Helena really wants Demetrius to love her, but can’t do anything about it. I wonder if by the end of the play, Demetrius will learn to love her without the flower.

  10. Your wrongs do set a scandal upon my sex.
    We cannot fight for love as men may do.
    We should be wooed and were not made to woo.
    (2.1.247-249)

    In the above statement, Helena claims that Demetrius, who had rejected her countless times, insulted her and other women. She states that women cannot fight for love like men can, nor should have to pursue men. Instead, men should be the ones pursuing women. To support her belief, Helena gives the following evidence: If women must chase men for love, then that would be like the weaker nymph Daphne pursuing the great god Apollo. It would be like a dove chasing a strong griffin, or a deer chasing a tiger. Helena makes the point that this makes no sense, and therefore Demetrius, the supposed stronger one, should not be running from her. Frankly, I don’t really agree with Helena. Yes, Demetrius’ doesn’t behave very well to Helena. He threatens to do bad things to her if she follows him into the woods, and turns her away every single time. However, if someone loves Demetrius, he shouldn’t have to return the same feeling if he doesn’t want to. Even if Helena isn’t strong enough to fight for love like men can, that does not make it so that she has to be the one being pursued. Just because she is a woman does not mean she deserves Demetrius’ love.

    • I enjoyed reading your blog. We both have the same opinion on the truthfulness of what Helena is saying, but we have different reason for our answers.

  11. In Mid Summer Night’s Dream, in Act II, scene i, William Shakespeare writes about women like no ever has. He writes about women from a different perspective. His muse is Helena. She’s passionate, crazy in love, and would do anything for Demetrius. She even accurately describes her chasing after Demetrius, like how Apollo chased after Daphne; however, the roles are switched. However, as much as a goal seeker she is, she says to Demetrius,
    “Your wrongs do set a scandal on my sex.
    We cannot fight for love as men may do.
    We should be wooed and were not made to woo.”
    (Act II, scene i, 247-249)
    She says how women were not meant to flirt with men, they were created to be flirted with. They don’t have the perseverance to fight for a man like men fight for women. However, I think the point of her saying this “mini speech” is so that Demetrius knows that she will never give up on him. William Shakespeare has a common theme with women in this play. Of all the main women, I have seen, they are all rebellious, bold, and they don’t go well with doing what they’re told to do. We haven’t read much about Hippolyta; however, she is a Amazon warrior. Warriors tend to be fierce and resilient. I think she will do anything to prevent her wedding from occurring. William Shakespeare was way ahead of his time, as he pictured women as risk takers, and not the boring trophy wife.

    • I love the last comment you made 🙂 Shakespeare was so ahead of his time. It’s almost unbelievable that things were different so long ago.

  12. We all knew from the beginning that Helena’s plan was terrible. In fact, not only does Demetrius not love Helena but because of the plan, Demetrius now cannot tolerate her. After Helena warns Demetrius about how Hermia is going to run away, Demetrius goes to the forest and begins searching for his love. Helena follows him and tries to confess her love to him. Demetrius just tells her to go away and goes on to say, “I am sick when I look on thee.” At this point, Helena utters, “Your wrongs do set a scandal on my sex. / We cannot fight for love as men may do./ We should be wooed and were not made to woo.” What Helena is saying is that Demetrius insults all women. Helena goes on to say that women aren’t able to battle over love like a man can and men need to pursue women not the other way around. Hermia is correct in some ways and wrong in others. Hermia is right that women fight differently than men. While men may physically or verbally attack other men for love, Shakespeare’s female characters make bold but impetuous plans to fight over males. Hermia’s next statement is wrong. While women may fight differently than men, they are not unable to fight. Helena does give some evidence of Demetrius insulting her: “Ay, in the temple, in the town, the field / You do me mischief. Fie, Demetrius!” Overall, I disagree with Helena’s statement for one crucial reason. Demetrius is pursuing his love and he is fighting for his love. His love is just Hermia instead of Helena. Helen is stuck in a horrible situation, we can only hope Puck can solve the problem with the little western love flower.

  13. Towards the end of Act II scene i, Helena has had enough of Demetrius’ lack of love. She is still trying to get him to love her, and now she has to come up with another plan, for betraying her best friend and telling Demetrius about what Lysander and Hermia were going to do, Demetrius is still not interested in Helena. Helena keeps bugging Demetrius, and finally, Demetrius tells her to leave him alone, to which she replies with,
    Your wrongs do set a scandal upon my sex.
    We cannot fight for love as men may do.
    We should be wooed and were not made to woo. (2.1.247-249)

    Here she is telling Demetrius what she thinks. She tells him that he is a bully, not just to her but to the whole female gender. She says that she cannot openly fight over love like men do. It is not socially accepted. She says that men should be flirting with, and getting the woman’s attention, but that they are not doing it correctly.

    So far this whole play has shown just how far ahead Shakespeare was in his writing. I know that people how already talked about this, but it is the truth. So far, every female in the play, other then Hipolyta, has disobeyed there men. Whether it be Helena being with Lysander instead of with Demetrius, like her father has commanded. Or with Hermia constantly trying to gain the love and respect she wants from Demetrius, who clearly has his eyes on other woman, and doesn’t want anything to do with Hermia. Even the fairies are taking part. Titania is standing up for herself and won’t give Oberon the Indian Boy.

    But what I want to know, is if Shakespeare truly believed that women should have more say. It is obvious that Shakespeare writes about women who command respect, even if they do it quietly, and secretly; they are still striving for the ability to say no, or yes, when they want to. But is Shakespeare writing about this because he wants to bring attention to the issue, or is does he simply think that it makes a good play, and therefore more money? It could be both, I think this would be smoething interesting to talk about in class, and hear what other people think.

  14. In this quote, Helena tells Demetrius a sexist comment in a desperate attempt to get Demetrius to love her again. She says that women are too weak to fight the way men fight over love, like Tybalt and Romeo, and that women weren’t made to woo others but to be wooed. Him not wooing her but Helena trying to woo him seemed scandalous back then, which made sense back then, but many do not see this as a problem in the modern day. I do not agree to what Helena is saying. Even though women back then were not very independent, today women have no problem in working by themselves. Even there, before Helena acted strong and independent despite feeling envious and angry at her lover for dumping her for her best friend that did not even want him.

  15. In Act II, scene i of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Helena once again goes for Demetrius. He rejects her and tells her to leave him alone. Helena’s reply is, “Your wrongs do set a scandal upon my sex./We cannot fight for love as men may do./We should be wooed and were not made to woo” (II. i. 247-249). Helena is saying that she has been trying to get Demetrius to like her for so long, and he isn’t doing anything. She says that he is the one that is supposed to be wooing her; men are supposed to woo women, not the other way around. I don’t agree with Helena. Even though in those times women did do some fighting for love. Look at Hermia and Lysander for instance, they love each other but Hermia’s father is against them being together. Hermia doesn’t completely give in to his command, which is her fighting for love. This brings us back to Shakespeare being ahead of his time. He builds strong female characters, that were out of the ordinary so long ago. Now, it is normal for a girl to try and get a guy to like her, but back then it wasn’t, which adds to Shakespeare being so brilliant.

  16. Helena’s speech to Demetrius was: “Your wrongs do set a scandal upon my sex.
    We cannot fight for love as men may do.
    We should be wooed and were not made to woo. “(2.1.247-249).
    I think is Helena venting and sharing her frustrations with the way Demetrius is treating her in these scene. Demetrius is shooing poor Helena away and repeatedly insulting her looks and her character. But there is nothing Helena can do to make him fall in love with her. According to the times, Helena was the one who had to be pursued and she wasn’t supposed to pursue the man. Helena needed to wait to get fallen in love with, but Demetrius just isn’t interested. She clearly doesn’t think it’s fair she just has to hope that’s someone will want her instead of her being able to pursue a man. Helena wants to be bold and put herself out there, but the society she exists in prohibits that kind of behavior from women. I think Helena’s purpose in saying what she said was to tell Demetrius that despite what he and society expects of her, she will never back oof of him. She will fight for her and she doesn’t care that people will disapprove. Helena really subverts the tropes of the time.

  17. In Helena’s speech, she claims that women cannot flirt the way men do, and try to woo someone. Women were designed to have a man woo her, so they can fall in love. She tells him how much she does love him, and she admits to Demetrius that it frustrates her when he goes after Hermia who doesn’t love him back. Personally, I do not agree with her. Romance is a something that should be mutual, and that does mean women should be active in the flirting aspect. Of course, people shouldn’t be patriarchan lovers, and just worship and obsess over a person, but hey should show someone affection that they love deeply. Helena isn’t afraid to tell Demetrius how she feels about him, and she tells him what upsets her about him. She shouldn’t be following and arguing with him as he goes t find another lady. Especially all the things he said to her, such as he is sick when he looks her, it is not worth it for Helena.

  18. Today, we read about how Oberon has sent Puck (Good Sir Robin) to retrieve a flower that has the ability to make any person fall in love with the next thing they see. As well as this, Helena is following Demetrius throughout the forest as he searches for Hermia and Lysander. Just before they leave the scene, Helena states, “Your wrongs do set a scandal upon my sex./We cannot fight for love as men may do./We should be wooed and were not made to woo.”(Act 2. Scene 1. Lines 247 – 249) In this statement, Helena states that women don’t have the ability to fight for love the same way that men do, and that Demetrius has insulted her gender as a whole. She displays that she believes that women should be flirted with, not being forced to flirt with. This demonstrates the theme in Shakespeare of very progressive Ideas about the actions of women, such as how Juliet, such as how Juliet acted even more responsible than Romeo, and how she even committed suicide with a “Man’s Weapon.” Similarly, In a midsummer night’s dream, Helena speaks about her mistreatment based on her gender. Moments before, during the scene, there is an extended simile made by Helena:

    The wildest hath not such a heart as you.
    Run when you will. The story shall be changed:
    Apollo flies and Daphne holds the chase;
    The dove pursues the griffin; the mild hind
    Makes speed to catch the tiger. Bootless speed
    When cowardice pursues and valor flies! (Act 2, Scene 1, Lines. 236 – 241)

    Here she compares herself to prey, and Demetrius to the predator, however, she has switched the roles of predator and prey. Rightfully, the prey chasing predator sounds unrealistic, thus the point Helena is making; It is ridiculous that she should be chasing after him when she is not made to chase.

  19. In act II scene i, Helena says,

    “Your wrongs do set a scandal upon my sex.We cannot fight for love as men may do.We should be wooed and were not made to woo. (2.1.247-249)”

    She is basically saying that women can’t fight for love like men can, and it is supposed to be the man flirting with the women. While I disagree with that statement, during this time period that was just the way it was supposed to be. Helena is very desperate and she wants him to woo her, but unfortunately he just doesn’t love her. The evidence of this from the scene. Helena has no power over Demetrius, and therefore he can say what he wants to her. “You do impeach your modesty too much, To leave the city and commit yourself Into the hands of one that loves you not, To trust the opportunity of night And the ill counsel of a desert place With the rich worth of your virginity.” Demetrius doesn’t care about her at all, and he is really disrespecting her. He insults her on numerous occasions, and he just wants her to leave him alone. I think in a way he is insulting women because he obviously isn’t even listening or taking her feelings to consideration. No women during this time period could get a man if they are in love with someone else, and that is sad for Helena because she loves him so much. He doesn’t respect her at all, and that is just plain wrong. Even if he doesn’t love her, at least be more of a nicer person. Helena is upset, and I am excited to see what she does in the future.

  20. In Act II scene i, Helena makes the following claim about women:

    “Your wrongs do set a scandal upon my sex.
    We cannot fight for love as men may do.
    We should be wooed and were not made to woo.”(II.i.247-249).

    Clearly, this is her way of complaining and saying that love isn’t fair to her. For some unknown reason, I feel like she is just crying and babying about the idea that her love is unfair to her.

    Anywho, the claim that is interesting is the second line. In this line, she is essentially stating that women are not capable of being persistent and getting a man to love them. This statement is one that I can agree with because it is accurate for Shakespeare’s time period. Back then, women were not capable of winning over a man because the men had all the power. When a man would get married, he would pick his spouse and the father of the woman would agree to the marriage. There was no point in trying to convince a man to love you because he had already decided before anyone had spoken.

    However, in our time period it would seem as if the women are able to pick whoever they want as their partner. It’s a lot more common and realistic to have a crowd of boys liking one pretty girl than the other way around. It’s interesting how Helena is saying that girls are meant to be wooed and that they can’t woo, because that is the how today’s society is. This introduces the common Shakespeare character trait of being ahead of their time.

  21. In Act 2 scene i Helena says a few words that really do have a lasting impact and a strong claim.”Your wrongs do set a scandal upon my sex.
    We cannot fight for love as men may do.
    We should be wooed and were not made to woo.”
    (2.1.247-249)
    Helena is clearly trying to say that Demetrius can’t use her once and then get rid of her. By doing this Demetrius is not mocking Helena alone but is actually mocking the whole female race. She angrily states how she doesn’t want to follow him around or fight for his love becuase she knows at the time it was morally wrong. However she has no choice in this matter since Demetrius literally used her and her heart and then suddenly fell in love with another. This claim also shows how progressive Shakespeare really is in this play. It was most likely normal for men to use woman and then disregard them, but in this scene he specifically states that this was wrong and if the role were reversed everyone would look down to it. All in all Shakespeare really shows modern concepts through Helena in this scene.

  22. In these words Helena is saying that Demetrius is shaming women by not taking her on, and that she still loves him either way. Overall, Helena is not going to give up, no matter what to get Demetrius, and he still wants Hermia.

  23. In the second act of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, core ideas begin to highlight themselves. Specifically on the topic of women, and how they are treated in society. In the beginning of act i, we are already introduced to the forward nature of the social commentary on women at the time, just like in Romeo and Juliet. Hermia goes directly against her father’s will and marries Lysander. At the time, women were considered property instead of people, and through the proper raising of such property, you could earn yourself some livestock, crops, or money by marrying her to a rich man. Hermia directly ignores this and decides to make her and Lysander’s lives happier instead of obeying as property. In the meantime, Helena tries yet again to make Demetrious love her, indicating her decision to sabotage her friend failed. Here, Demetrious finally rejects her, like he should have much earlier. Helena’s response is a radical one. She begins to lose her calm as she starts claiming how Demetrious has insulted her and the entirety of the female gender. It is ridiculous to make such assumptions and express them on behalf of such a huge demographic, and Helena here simply does not wish to accept she has been rejected.

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