O my love, my wife!

Tonight you must finish reading the play and notice all the differences between the film and the the text.  Then, paraphrase and analyze Romeo’s soliloquy, Act V, scene iii.    What metaphors, references, and comparisons does he use?  How does this help the reader or audience member understand his anguish?  What insight about life and death is Shakespeare conveying to his audience?

O my love! my wife!
Death, that hath suck’d the honey of thy breath,
Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty:
Thou art not conquer’d; beauty’s ensign yet
Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,
And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.
Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet?
O, what more favour can I do to thee,
Than with that hand that cut thy youth in twain
To sunder his that was thine enemy?
Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,
Why art thou yet so fair? shall I believe
That unsubstantial death is amorous,
And that the lean abhorred monster keeps
Thee here in dark to be his paramour?
For fear of that, I still will stay with thee;
And never from this palace of dim night
Depart again: here, here will I remain
With worms that are thy chamber-maids; O, here
Will I set up my everlasting rest,
And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars
From this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last!
Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O you
The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss
A dateless bargain to engrossing death!
Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide!
Thou desperate pilot, now at once run on
The dashing rocks thy sea-sick weary bark!
Here’s to my love! [Drinks.]  O true apothecary!
Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die.          [Falls.]

R&J blog #15

33 thoughts on “O my love, my wife!

  1. Oh my love! My wife!
    Death, that has took the sweetness out of your breath,
    Has no power to stop your beauty:
    You are not defeated; beauty is still
    Red on you lips and cheeks,
    And death’s paleness has not reached them.
    Tybalt, do you lie on those bloody sheets?
    Oh, how can I help you,
    Than with the hand that killed your youth
    Kill me that was your enemy?
    Forgive me, cousin! Ah dear Juliet,
    Why are you so beautiful? Shall I think
    That important death is romantic,
    And that the swift hated monster holds
    You here in the dark to be his lover?
    I am afraid, I will stay here with you;
    And never from dark place of eternal night
    Escape: I will remain here
    With worms that are your cleaners; Oh, here
    Will I stay forever,
    And shake the bond of unlucky stars
    From this worn skin. Eyes, take your last look around!
    Arms, embrace for the last time! And, lips, oh you
    Doors of breath, close with a rightful kiss
    A endless bargain of capturing death!
    Come, bitter actions, come, disagreeable guide!
    You desperate guide, immediately run on
    The daring rocks your seasick exhausted bark!
    Here’s to my love! [He drinks poison] Oh righteous apothecary!
    Your potion was quick! And with this kiss I die. [Falls.]

    The movie had a lot of things that were different from the actually play. For one, Paris didn’t die. In the movie, Paris was last seen when Juliet was found dead. He didn’t come to see her in her resting place after she was put there. He and Romeo didn’t have a fight. Another difference was that in the play, the Prince, Montagues, and Capulets came immediately to the resting place of Juliet. In the movie, Romeo and Juliet were carried to the church and they had a big ceremony there. The movie also left out the part where the Friar tells Juliet about Romeo being dead. In the movie, the Friar tries to hide the fact that Romeo is dead and Juliet peeks around him to see Romeo. In the play, the Friar is honest with Juliet and tells her right away what happened to Romeo. The movie left a lot out that were in the play, and some of them were very important, such as Paris’ death. Zeffirelli might have done that on purpose, maybe to keep the movie closer to the two hours that the play was supposed to last, or maybe it showed a dark side to Romeo. That might also be why the movie left out the apothecary part. It shows that Romeo is not afraid to bribe and kill people as long as he gets what he wants. The movie director probably wanted people to believe that Romeo and Juliet were very innocent. Zeffirelli also left out the part about Juliet talking about bashing her brains out because that also shows a dark and evil side to the two teens. And although some things were not included in the movie, the plot and actions that happened in the movie followed the play pretty well.

  2. After much dedication to reading each chapter and analyzing it, we finally finish the book, Romeo and Juliet, by William Shakespeare. Fortunately, our class got to see the movie unfold the plot but after reading tonight’s chapters, I realized that they were different. One major difference between the two was Paris. In the movie, Paris didn’t go to the cave and then die o Romeo’s watch. I think Zeffirelli did this to put the focus on only Romeo and Juliet and people won’t get confused with why Paris is interfering the connection. Also, one from each house died which seems more even. In William Shakespeare’s version, he included Paris because it brought more action. When Romeo sees Juliet he says, “O my love! my wife! Death, that hath suck’d the honey of thy breath, Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty: Thou art not conquer’d; beauty’s ensign yet Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks, And death’s pale flag is not advanced there. Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet? O, what more favour can I do to thee, Than with that hand that cut thy youth in twain To sunder his that was thine enemy? Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet, Why art thou yet so fair? shall I believe That unsubstantial death is amorous, And that the lean abhorred monster keeps Thee here in dark to be his paramour? For fear of that, I still will stay with thee; And never from this palace of dim night Depart again: here, here will I remain With worms that are thy chambermaids; O, here Will I set up my everlasting rest, And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars From this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last! Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O you The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss A dateless bargain to engrossing death! Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide! Thou desperate pilot, now at once run on The dashing rocks thy seasick weary bark! Here’s to my love! [Drinks.] O true apothecary! Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die.” This can be translated to: Oh, my love! My wife! Death has took your life, but it has not yet ruined your beauty. You haven’t been conquered. There is still red in your lips and in your cheeks. Death has not yet turned them pale. Tybalt, oh, what better favor can I do for you than to kill the man who killed you with the same hand that made you die young. Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet, why are you still so beautiful? Should I believe that death is in love with you, and that the awful monster keeps you here to be his mistress? I don’t like that idea, so I’ll stay with you. And I will never leave this tomb. Here, here I’ll remain with worms that are your chambermaids. Oh, I’ll rest here forever. I’ll forget about all the bad luck that has troubled me. Arms, make your last embrace! And lips, you are the things that keep you breathing. Seal with a righteous kiss the deal I have made with death forever. Come, bitter poison, come, unsavory guide! You desperate pilot, let’s crash this sea-weary ship into the rocks! Here’s to my love! Oh, that pharmacist was honest! His drugs work quickly. So I die with a kiss.
    Romeo’s anguish is shown here through his metaphors. This is because he was depressed and loved Juliet. He loved her so much that he would kill himself just to take him out of his misery that he is alone. I would definitely recommend this book to others because this book is truly beautiful and it has so many smart ideas.

  3. O my love, o my wife!
    The death that has taken the sweetness from your lips
    Still does not affect your beauty
    You have not been defeated, flag of beauty yet
    Is red in your cheeks and in your lips
    And death’s pale flag has not yet reached there.
    Tybalt, you lie there in your red sheets?
    What more of a favor can I do for you
    Than with the hand that split your youth
    to split the youth of his, who was your enemy?
    Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet
    Why are you still so beautiful? Will I believe
    That unreasonable death is romantic?
    And that the skinny, hated monster keeps
    you here in the dark as his spouse?
    Because I am scared of that, I will stay here with you
    And never from this palace of dark night
    leave again: here, here I will stay
    With the worms as your maids. Oh here!
    I will set my forever lasting rest
    and shake the collar of the unlucky stars
    From this body worn out from the world Eyes, look for the last time!
    Arms, hug for the last time, Lips, O you!
    Gates of breath, close with a righteous kiss
    A timeless bargain to capture death’s interest.
    O come, foul action, come disgraceful guide!
    You desperate pilot, now immediately run on
    Arching rocks your sea-sick worn out bark
    Here’s to my love! Oh true chemist,
    your poison is quick, and so with a kiss I die!

    The imagery Romeo uses here is very elaborate, and hence very vividly described his anguish to the audience. It enforces the thought of how artistically and romantically used language to express his exact feelings to whether it be Juliet, Benvolio, or simply the audience present.

  4. In the conclusion of Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare, it is revealed that Romeo, Juliet, and Paris die. Romeo had been told by his servant, Balthasar, reported to Romeo that Juliet has died. As a result, Romeo made plans to return to Verona to see Juliet. He offers a poor apothecary a large amount of money to sell him poison illegally. The poison will enable Romeo to be reunited with Juliet in their death. Upon viewing Juliet body that had seemed to be dead, Romeo marveled at the beauty of her and kissed her. Before drinking the poison he said:

    O my love! my wife!
    Death, that hath suck’d the honey of thy breath,
    Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty:
    Thou art not conquer’d; beauty’s ensign yet
    Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,
    And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.
    Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet?
    O, what more favour can I do to thee,
    Than with that hand that cut thy youth in twain
    To sunder his that was thine enemy?
    Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,
    Why art thou yet so fair? shall I believe
    That unsubstantial death is amorous,
    And that the lean abhorred monster keeps
    Thee here in dark to be his paramour?
    For fear of that, I still will stay with thee;
    And never from this palace of dim night
    Depart again: here, here will I remain
    With worms that are thy chamber-maids; O, here
    Will I set up my everlasting rest,
    And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars
    From this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last!
    Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O you
    The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss
    A dateless bargain to engrossing death!
    Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide!
    Thou desperate pilot, now at once run on
    The dashing rocks thy sea-sick weary bark!
    Here’s to my love! [Drinks.] O true apothecary!
    Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die. [Falls.]

    Paraphrased:
    Oh, my love! My wife!
    Death has sucked the honey from your breath,
    but it has not yet ruined your beauty.
    You haven’t been conquered.
    There is still red in your lips and in your cheeks.
    Death has not yet turned them pale.
    Tybalt, are you lying there in your bloody death shroud?
    Oh, what better favor can I do for you
    than to kill the man who killed you with the same hand that made you die young.
    To kill his enemy?
    Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,
    why are you still so beautiful? Should I believe
    that death is in love with you,
    and that the awful monster keeps
    you here to be his mistress?
    I don’t like that idea, so I’ll stay with you.
    And I will never leave this dark tomb again
    Here I will remain
    I’ll remain with worms that are your chamber-maids.
    Oh, I’ll rest here forever.
    I’ll forget about all the bad luck that has troubled me.
    Eyes, look out for the last time!
    Arms, make your last embrace!
    And lips, you are the doors of breath.
    Seal with a righteous kiss the deal I have made with death forever.
    Come, bitter poison, come, unsavory guide!
    You desperate pilot,
    let’s crash this sea-weary ship into the rocks!
    Here’s to my love! Oh, that pharmacist was honest!
    His drugs work quickly. So I die with a kiss.

    This soliloquy from Romeo is very important and significant to the story. Shakespeare’s portrays melancholy, anguish, and romantic feelings within Romeo with the use of metaphors. These metaphor compare Romeo’s feelings to other sad things. Romeo seems absolutely heartbroken at the scene of Juliet that appears dead. He was depressed and loved Juliet so dearly, that he wanted to die to see her again in their death. He killed himself for the sake of his love for Juliet. Shakespeare is showing that life and death are directly connected, and death can come suddenly, at any time. I really enjoy this reading of Romeo and Juliet, and definitely, recommend it. I hope to read and analyze more Shakespeare.

  5. Tonight upon finishing Romeo and Juliet, Romeo goes and finds that his wife is supposedly dead. He goes to her and say,

    “O my love! my wife!
    Death, that hath suck’d the honey of thy breath,
    Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty:
    Thou art not conquer’d; beauty’s ensign yet
    Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,
    And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.
    Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet?
    O, what more favour can I do to thee,
    Than with that hand that cut thy youth in twain
    To sunder his that was thine enemy?
    Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,
    Why art thou yet so fair? shall I believe
    That unsubstantial death is amorous,
    And that the lean abhorred monster keeps
    Thee here in dark to be his paramour?
    For fear of that, I still will stay with thee;
    And never from this palace of dim night
    Depart again: here, here will I remain
    With worms that are thy chambermaids; O, here
    Will I set up my everlasting rest,
    And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars
    From this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last!
    Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O you
    The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss
    A dateless bargain to engrossing death!
    Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide!
    Thou desperate pilot, now at once run on
    The dashing rocks thy seasick weary bark!
    Here’s to my love!
    Drinks
    O true apothecary!
    Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die.
    Falls.” (ll. -, page ).

    When paraphrased,

    “O my love! my wife!
    Death, that has sucked your breath away,
    Has no power on your beauty:
    You aren’t conquered; Beauty still lies
    In the red of your lips and cheeks,
    Death has not made them pale.
    Tybalt, are you lying there in your bloody death shroud?
    What other flavor can I do to you,
    That with the hand that slew you
    Use it to kill the one who ended your life?
    Forgive me cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,
    Why are you still so beautiful? Should I believe
    That unsubstantial death is in love,
    And the lean, hated monster keeps
    You here in this chamber to be his mistress?
    Because of that, I’ll stay with you;
    And never will I depart from this dark place
    Again, here, here I’ll stay
    With worms that are your chambermaids; Oh, here
    I’ll set up my permanent rest
    And shake the bad luck I have
    From this body. Eyes, look for the last time!
    Arms, take your last embrace! And lips, O you
    THe doors of breath, seal with a rightful kiss
    Seal the deal of my death!
    Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavory guide!
    You desperate pilot, lets go to
    The rocks and drive our ship into them!
    Here’s to my love!
    Drinks
    O true apothecary!
    Your drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die.
    Falls”

    I found there to be a striking comparison between the movie and book. First, the movie left out the killing of Paris, one of my favorite parts in the scene. The movie also seemed to go by quicker. The book seemed very drawn out, especially Romeo’s speech to Juliet. It seems overly dramatic, in a way. However, I do understand why he would be angry and distraught, as his only love just died. While reading his soliloquy, I found Romeo making yet another reference to the “stars’ again. This ties in with the idea of fate in the play. Romeo continuously returns to the idea that everything is predestined, and to me, this adds a whole new tier of grief for Romeo. If he does buy into the idea of fate, then to him, he must be regretting his decisions leading up to this point as they could have helped him save Juliet.Through this, I think Shakespeare is telling us to pay attention. If Romeo had paid attention to Balthazar and stayed put, everything would have gone well, and all would be good. To be honest, although already knew the ending, I found the way the play ended to be satisfying and will miss reading it.

  6. O my love! my wife!- My love! My wife!
    Death, that hath suck’d the honey of thy breath,- Death, that took the honey out of your breath
    Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty:- Had no power on your beauty yet
    Thou art not conquer’d; beauty’s ensign yet-You are not conquered; beauty is not taken over yet
    Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,-Your crimson in your lips and cheeks is still there
    And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.- And deaths paleness has not reached there
    Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet?-Tybalt, you lie in your bloody sheet
    O, what more favour can I do to thee,- What bigger favor can I give you,
    Than with that hand that cut thy youth in twain- Then with the hand that killed you
    To sunder his that was thine enemy?-Kill myself, who was your enemy?
    Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,- Forgive me! Ah, Juliet,
    Why art thou yet so fair? shall I believe- Why are you so pretty? Should I believe
    That unsubstantial death is amorous,- That death is in love with you
    And that the lean abhorred monster keeps- And the mean monster keeps
    Thee here in dark to be his paramour?- You in the dark as his lover?
    For fear of that, I still will stay with thee;- For the fear of that, I will stay with you
    And never from this palace of dim night- And never from this dark palace
    Depart again: here, here will I remain-Leave again: here I will stay
    With worms that are thy chamber-maids; O, here- With worms that are the maids; Here
    Will I set up my everlasting rest,- I will rest forever
    And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars-And forget the bad luck of the stars
    From this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last!- From this sad flesh. Eyes, take your last look!
    Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O you- Arms, have your last hug! And lips, you
    The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss- The doors of breath, seal with a kiss
    A dateless bargain to engrossing death!- A deal with never ending death!
    Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide!- Here, bitter poison, come, terrible guide!
    Thou desperate pilot, now at once run on- You desperate pilot, now run
    The dashing rocks thy sea-sick weary bark!- And crash into the rocks!
    Here’s to my love! [Drinks.] O true apothecary!-Here’s to love! (drinks) Oh druggist!
    Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die.- Your drugs work quick. And with a kiss i die.
    [Falls.]- Falls
    In this long speech, Romeo makes many comparisons with love. For example, he compares love with a monster who wants to keep Juliet. And says that for the fear of that he will stay with her forever. He also compares love to a ship that is going to crash. He is saying that their love is crashing with his death. These comparisons along with others help the reader to better understand what he is feeling. Shakespeare has used this technique a lot so far to show how the characters feel. In this speech we see how life and death co-exist. The love that life gave Romeo and Juliet is the reason they die. There is no life without death.

  7. Romeo finds out that Juliet has supposedly dies, and decides to kill himself to lie at her side.

    Paraphrase:

    My love! My wife!
    The sweetness has been removed from your breath by death
    You had no power with that beauty
    Your beatuy hasn’t gone away, it is still there
    And there is still red in your lips and cheeks
    And death’s effect has not gone there
    Is that Tybalt who lies in that grave?
    Oh, what can I do to favor you
    I killed you with my hand
    When I thought you were my enemy
    Forgive me cousin! Dear Juliet,
    How are you still so beautiful
    I believe that death is loved
    By that hated monster who keeps
    You here, in the dark, as his trophy?
    He fears that I will still stay with you
    And I will never leave this
    Place of darkness. I will stay here
    With the worms that are our maids.
    I will set up my forever home
    And screw up those unpleasant stars
    From this worn-down flesh: Look at those eyes!
    Those arms will take this last hug, and those lips
    Will be sealed off after this final kiss
    A bargain lasting forever is death
    Come, bitter conduct, come unsavoury guide!
    My desperate hero, now has crashed
    The sharp rocks on the bark
    This is for you! True apothecary!
    These drugs are good. After this kiss, I die.

    Shakespeare uses multiple comparisons and descriptive characteristics to describe the amount of sadness and anguish that Romeo is feeling. Romeo is speaking highly continuously of Juliet, and says that every part of her is still beautiful even though she is dead. He says that her face, her eyes, her lips, and even the red of her lips and cheeks are still there, and still making her beautiful to him. He also talks to and apologizes to Tybalt, who he killed. Romeo was hateful and spiteful of Tybalt when he killed him, but now that Juliet has died and Romeo’s banishment was probably the cause of it, he is now apologetic and regrets his decision to murder Tybalt. After descirbing Juliet and telling her dead body that she is still pretty, he starts to talk about his death and suicide. He tells Juliet that he will kill himself so he can lie by her side forever, and that the two of them can be together forever in the tomb. He gives Juliet a final hug and a final kiss, and drinks the poison and dies.

    • I enjoyed reading your blog. I like how you mention how Romeo rants on about Juliet. Overall, you had a nice blog and I how enjoyed reading your paraphrased text.

  8. O my love! my wife!
    Death, that hath suck’d the honey of thy breath,
    Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty:
    Thou art not conquer’d; beauty’s ensign yet
    Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,
    And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.
    Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet?
    O, what more favour can I do to thee,
    Than with that hand that cut thy youth in twain
    To sunder his that was thine enemy?
    Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,
    Why art thou yet so fair? shall I believe
    That unsubstantial death is amorous,
    And that the lean abhorred monster keeps
    Thee here in dark to be his paramour?
    For fear of that, I still will stay with thee;
    And never from this palace of dim night
    Depart again: here, here will I remain
    With worms that are thy chamber-maids; O, here
    Will I set up my everlasting rest,
    And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars
    From this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last!
    Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O you
    The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss
    A dateless bargain to engrossing death!
    Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide!
    Thou desperate pilot, now at once run on
    The dashing rocks thy sea-sick weary bark!
    Here’s to my love! [Drinks.] O true apothecary!
    Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die.

    When paraphrased:
    Oh, my love! my wife!
    Death has sucked the honey of thy breath,
    It has no power on your beauty:
    You are not conquered; your beauty lives on
    In the red of your lips and in your cheeks,
    Death did not harm you there.
    Tybalt, are you lying on your bloody death shroud?
    Oh, how can I help you,
    Than by killing the person who killed you,
    and kill my self?
    Forgive me, cousin! Juliet,
    Why are you still beautiful? shall I believe
    That unsubstantial death is normal,
    And that death keeps
    you here to be his mistress?
    I will stay with you;
    And never from the tomb
    I will leave;
    I’ll set up my permanent rest
    And shake the bad luck I have
    From this body. Eyes, look for the last time!
    Arms, take your last embrace! And lips, O you
    The doors of breath, seal with a rightful kiss
    Seal the deal of my death!
    Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavory guide!
    You desperate pilot lets go to
    The rocks and drive our ship into them!
    Here’s to my love!
    Drinks
    O, true apothecary!
    Your drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss, I die.

    Romeo is very upset about Juliet’s loss and says how beautiful she is even when she is dead (CREEPY!). He keeps talking about love even though the love of his life is dead. How ironic. He keeps using similes to express how much he loved Juliet and how torn apart he is to the fact that she is dead.

  9. Oh, my love! My wife!
    Death, who has removed the sweetness of your breath,
    Cannot remove your beauty:
    You are not defeated; Beauty’s colors still
    Are red in your lips and cheeks,
    They have not been turned pale by death.
    Tybalt, do you lie there in your bloody sheet?
    Is there anything else I can give you,
    With the hand that killed you
    Then to kill your enemy?
    I am sorry Cousin! Juliet,
    Why are you so beautiful? Should I believe
    That fragile death is lovely,
    And that the small hated beast keeps
    You in darkness as his lover?
    I will stay with you to protect you from that;
    And this dark tomb, I will never
    Leave: I will always stay here
    With the worms who will assist you; Here
    Is where I will die.
    And stop the unlucky power the stars have over
    this tired body. This is my last look at the world!
    This is my final hug! Lips,
    which we use to breathe, end with a worthy kiss
    A deal to be forever dead!
    Advance, hard passage, approach difficult guide
    You hopeless pilot, who will now
    Crash this tired ship into the rocks!
    Here is to my love! [Drinks.] Dependable apothecary!
    Your drugs are fast. Hence, I will now die with a kiss.

    Romeo uses many comparisons, metaphors, and references to express his anguish in his soliloquy in Act 5 Scene 3 from the tragedy Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare. One particular metaphor that was interesting was when Romeo compared himself to a pilot. After working so hard and long, Romeo has given up and will end his life. This hints at the amount of pain Romeo must be feeling. Even with Juliet dead, Romeo still feels a need to protect her. Romeo discussed how Juliet was so beautiful, he believes death want to keep her as a lover. Afterword, Romeo said he will stay with Juliet forever to protect her. Romeo literally lived for Juliet and never wants to be separated from her. Since her believes she is now dead, Romeo wishes to meet her in an afterlife. Romeo and Juliet were made for each other and have gone through life’s biggest ceremony together. It is only fitting they die together.

    • I agree that Shakespeare’s comparison of Romeo to a pilot helps us understand the pain he feels. I also found it interesting that you compared Romeo and Juliet’s adventure to life’s ceremony.

  10. Oh my love! Oh my wife!
    Death has sucked the life away from your breath,
    Death has no power on your beauty:
    You are not conquered; Your beauty is still shown,
    crimson in your lips and cheek,
    and death’s pale look has not appeared.
    Tybalt, are you lying there on your bloody sheet?
    Oh, what more favors can I give to you,
    with the same hand that killed your youth
    kill your enemy?
    Forgive me, cousin! Ah dear Juliet,
    Why are you so beautiful? should I believe that
    an unsubstantial death is in love with you
    and that lean, hated monster keeps
    you in the darkness to be his wife?
    I fear that so I will stay with you
    And never from this palace of dim night,
    will I leave you ever. I will stay here,
    with the worms that are your chamber-maids. Oh, here
    will I rest forever
    and shake off all the troubles
    from this sad flesh. Eyes, look one last time.
    Arms, embrace for the last time. And lips,
    the doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss
    the deal I’ve made with death.
    Come poison,
    desperate pilot, run into
    the rocks, with our ship.
    Here’s to my love! The honest
    apothecary,
    the drug is quick, and with a kiss I die.

    Here, Romeo first talks about Juliet’s beauty. He says that even when she is dead, she is beautiful, and that death hasn’t stolen her beauty. Her lips and cheek are still red, and paleness has not reached her yet. Romeo compares death with a monster. He wants to be with Juliet in the afterlife because he fears, that because she is so beautiful, she will by taken by the monster. The monster has stolen her, so Romeo must kill himself to safe her, and retrieve her. He does not want to part with Juliet, and wants to be with her forever. Romeo also makes a comparison to his life with a ship. He is crashing his ship, or life, in order to take his life and be with Juliet.

  11. O my love! My wife!
    Death, that has sucked your honey-smelling breath away
    Had no effect on your beauty:
    You are not conquered: beauty’s flag still
    Is crimson in your lips and cheeks,
    And death’s pale effect has not advanced there
    Tybalt, you lie there in your bloody sheet?
    O, what favors can I do for you,
    Than with the hand that cut your youth in two
    Split mine that was your enemy?
    Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,
    Why are you so beautiful? Shall I believe
    That pitiful death is lustful,
    And that skinny disgusting monster keeps
    You here in the dark to be his lover?
    For fear of that, I still will stay with you;
    And I will never from this palace of dull night
    Leave again: here, here I will remain
    With worms that are your chamber-maids; O, here
    I will rest forever
    And shake the unfortunate fortunes of stars
    From this flesh that is tired of this world. Eyes, take your last look!
    Arms, take your last embrace! And lips, O you
    The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss
    A never-ending deal to intriguing death!
    Come, resentful behavior, come, unpleasant guide!
    You desperate sailor, at once run into
    The smashing rocks, you tired-of-the-sea sailor!
    Here’s to my love! O honest apothecary!
    Your drugs are fast-acting. Thus, with a kiss I die.

    Immediately after reading or during reading, I noticed a difference between the film version and the actual play. First of all, in Zeffirelli’s version, he does not include the battle between Romeo and Count Paris. In the text, Romeo encounters him on the way to the Capulet’s tomb and kills him in a duel. Throughout Romeo’s soliloquy in scene iii, he uses many metaphors, references, and comparisons with Juliet. The general idea of them is praising Juliet and crying of how beautiful she is, and also to disparage death. Just to list a few off: Romeo gives the sweet smell of honey to her breath, notices she still looks alive with beauty. He calls death a sexually desiring, disgusting monster, then calls her beautiful once more. Her great beauty along with the contrast of horrible death gives more feeling to Romeo’s anguish. In addition, Shakespeare adds more to our insight into life and death. In writing Romeo’s speech in this way, he makes us think more of death of something bad and wrong. It is the cause of much pain and sorrow throughout the entire play. Nevertheless, what allows Romeo and Juliet to be together in the end? That very thing. The two lover’s deaths cause the Montague and Capulet houses to live together peacefully, with life and prosperity. In general, it seems that life and death have a balance. Without life, there is no death. Without death, there is no life.

  12. O my love! my wife!
    Death, that has sucked out the sweetness of your breath.
    You had no power but by your beauty
    You have not been conquered; Beauty’s flag still
    Is deep red in your lips and cheeks.
    Death’s pale flag still has not reached it yet.
    Tybalt, do you lie there in that bloody sheet?
    O, what more help can I do to you,
    Than with the hand that cut the youth in two
    To split your enemy?
    Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,
    Why are you still so beautiful? shall I believe
    That death is romantic,
    And that the loathed monster keeps
    Her here in the dark to be his lover?
    Because of this fear, I will still stay with you;
    And never from this dim palace
    Will I ever depart from again: I will remain here,
    With worms that are my maids; O, here
    I will set up my everlasting rest,
    And shake the harness of the ominous stars
    From this scarred flesh. Eyes, take one last look!
    Arms, embrace her one last time! and, lips, O you,
    The entrance that help me breathe, seal my love with a kiss
    An untimed deal to death!
    Come, my bitter behavior, come, repugnant guide!
    I am a desperate pilot, now all at once running into
    The rocks hitting my tired wood!
    Here is to Juliet! [Drinks.] O this was made by a true apothecary!
    These drugs are fast. Finally, with a kiss, I die. [Falls.]

    In Romeo’s final speech, he compares death as a monster. He says that he is conquering her body, but he is also asking himself if death is claiming her as his lover. Because of that, he has decided to stay with her too by killing himself. This really shows how much Romeo loves Juliet. He would kill himself for her, and so would she. I see this as love can make your life better, but it can also kill you. In addition, seeing death as a monster and him with Juliet, it kind of reminds me of the Beauty and the Beast. The only difference is that Juliet fell over heels for Romeo and not for Death.

  13. O my love! my wife!- My love!
    Death, that hath suck’d the honey of thy breath,- Death has sucked the honey (smell) of your breath
    Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty:- but has no power over your beauty
    Thou art not conquer’d; beauty’s ensign yet- you have not been conquered yet.
    Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,- Your lips and cheeks are still red.
    And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.- Death did not turn them pale yet.
    Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet?- Tybalt lies there in the sheet?
    O, what more favour can I do to thee,- What can I do for you
    Than with that hand that cut thy youth in twain- than with the hand that killed you that you killed?
    To sunder his that was thine enemy?
    Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,- Forgive me cousin.
    Why art thou yet so fair? shall I believe- Juliet, how are you so beautiful?
    That unsubstantial death is amorous,- Is Death in love with you?
    And that the lean abhorred monster keeps- that the monster keeps you
    Thee here in dark to be his paramour?- in the dark to be his?
    For fear of that, I still will stay with thee;- In fear of that, I will stay with you,
    And never from this palace of dim night- and never leave you.
    Depart again: here, here will I remain- I will always stay with you.
    With worms that are thy chamber-maids; O, here- I will stay with the worms and the chamber maids.
    Will I set up my everlasting rest,- I will begin my sleep forever.
    And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars- I will forget about the bad times.
    From this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last!- Worldly flesh, eyes this will be the last you will see.
    Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O you- Arms, this will be the last you touch.
    The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss- Lips, I will end you with a rightful kiss.
    A dateless bargain to engrossing death!- I have made with death forever.
    Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide!- Come bitter poison!
    Thou desperate pilot, now at once run on- You desperate pilot
    The dashing rocks thy sea-sick weary bark!- take me into the rough rocks.
    Here’s to my love! [Drinks.] O true apothecary!- Here’s to Juliet!
    Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die.- The drugs have worked, with a kiss, I die.

    Romeo’s last words are all dedicated to Juliet. We see here that Romeo has no fear of death and mentally and physically prepares himself for death. There is impulsivity again in this scene. Romeo has is solilquoy and wastes no time. In the movie, we all groaned, when just as Romeo died, Juliet woke up from her coma. Time has never been a strong suit for them. Maybe, that’s what Shakespeare has been trying to tell us. If you are patient, and think rationally, the odds are more likely in your favor. In class today, we went over multiple themes and motifs that are dominantly present in Romeo and Juliet. I think time is a very crucial aspect to this relationship, this book and today in the 21st century.

  14. Oh the love of my life! My spouse!
    Death has taken away the sweetness of your soul,
    But it hasn’t taken away your beauty:
    You haven’t been conquered, you are still beautiful.
    Your cheeks are white and your lips are red.
    Death’s surrender flag hasn’t touched that.
    Tybalt, is that you under the bloody sheet?
    What is a better favour than to kill the man who is your murder.
    Please forgive me cousin! Oh my dear Juliet.
    Why are you so beautiful? Is it possible
    That this unreal death is somehow romantic towards you,
    And that monster keeps you here as his mistress?
    He is afraid I will stay and love you,
    And that I will never leave this dark tomb again.
    I will remain here with all of the dead bodies,
    And here is where I too will die,
    And shake the unpromising fate that has troubled me in life.
    This is the last time my eyes will look at you.
    The last time my arms will hug you.
    And the last time these lips will kiss you before their death.
    Come death, you unpleasant guide.
    You desperate navigator, now it is time for the journey.
    Here’s to Juliet! (drinks). Oh you honest apothecary!
    These drugs really are fast, I will die after this kiss.

    Romeo uses imagery to describe death as a desperate little monster who is taking Juliet away from him. He almost tries to challenge him right before he drinks the potion. He also uses fate as a metaphor, calling it “the yoke of inauspicious stars.” He talks about how fate didn’t want this to happen, and he was going against it because of how troubled he was on earth. I think he is upset about this loss, and is angry and screaming about everything wrong in the situation, and I feel bad for him. He is so impulsive and angry, he truly believes death is the only option. Comparing death to an enemy of his makes me understand how he feels about death in the first place. Also, there are many differences between the movie and the text, but for me it was Paris’s death. Paris and the Page were not in this scene in the movie, and he was never killed, which changes the plot a lot. In fact, Paris was rarely seen in the movie at all. Maybe it was an artistic choice made by the director, but I think Paris is an important character that could have made the story even better. I do prefer the text because of all the extra action, but the movie was well done aswell.

  15. Lines to paraphrase:

    “O my love! my wife!
    Death, that hath suck’d the honey of thy breath,
    Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty:
    Thou art not conquer’d; beauty’s ensign yet
    Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,
    And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.
    Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet?
    O, what more favour can I do to thee,
    Than with that hand that cut thy youth in twain
    To sunder his that was thine enemy?
    Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,
    Why art thou yet so fair? shall I believe
    That unsubstantial death is amorous,
    And that the lean abhorred monster keeps
    Thee here in dark to be his paramour?
    For fear of that, I still will stay with thee;
    And never from this palace of dim night
    Depart again: here, here will I remain
    With worms that are thy chambermaids; O, here
    Will I set up my everlasting rest,
    And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars
    From this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last!
    Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O you
    The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss
    A dateless bargain to engrossing death!
    Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide!
    Thou desperate pilot, now at once run on
    The dashing rocks thy seasick weary bark!
    Here’s to my love!
    O true apothecary!
    Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die.
    Falls.”

    Paraphrased:

    Oh my wife my love
    Death has stolen the sweetness of your breath
    But has no power over your beauty
    You haven’t been conquered for your beauty remains
    Your lips and cheeks are still red
    And the pale look of death has not overcome you
    Tybalt lies near you on his deathbed
    What can I do for you
    I am the one that cut his youth to end
    To make him surrender to his enemy
    Please forgive me friend, Oh my Juliet
    How are you still so beautiful, you make me think
    That death has no power on you
    And that the monster down her
    Keeps you for himself
    So I shall stay here to prevent that
    And from this place
    I will never leave, I will stay here forever
    With worms and dust, yet here
    I will stay for my eternal rest
    And defy the fate of judging stars
    From my body, I look upon you for the last time
    I take my last embrace
    And pull you to my lips for one last kiss
    We die at some time
    My time is now take me bitter one
    You desperate conductor take me, lets go
    To the rocks that make us seasick
    Here’s to my love!
    [drinks]
    O honest apothecary
    Those drugs were quick
    And with this last kiss, I die

    These last two scenes are immensely important to the story and the ending of the great Romeo and Juliet. When reading, there were some small and some huge differences made from the text and the Zeferelli movie version. In the written play, there is a huge difference when we learn that while Romeo went to see Juliet, so did Paris. They ended up fighting, and eventually, Romeo kills Paris. That detail was left out of the movie that we watched today in class. There could be many reasons that Zeferelli did that. Possibly to save time, to preserve the beauty of their last moments, or to perceive Romeo as more of a lover and not a fighter, because although he has killed one person before, it was for honor of his friend. Another detail left out was in scene two I believe. In the movie, we don’t learn that Friar John was held up at a quarantined house on his way to Romeo but they express that in the text. One thing that was expressed in the movie, and rightfully so, was Romeo’s soliloquy. This speech is quite beautiful and really helps you understand the love that he had for Juliet. He wanted to protect her from harm, praise her beauty and express to her just how much she meant to him. His last four lines that he utters while drinking the potion are very iconic and are the perfect way to end his life and his commitment to her. It shows us that he would do anything for her and wouldn’t ever want to live in a world that she was not in.

  16. Tonight we finished Romeo and Juliet. As we knew from the start, Romeo and Juliet both end up killing themselves. Once Romeo sees Juliet laying in her shroud he says,

    “O my love! my wife!
    Death, that hath suck’d the honey of thy breath,
    Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty:
    Thou art not conquer’d; beauty’s ensign yet
    Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,
    And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.
    Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet?
    O, what more favour can I do to thee,
    Than with that hand that cut thy youth in twain
    To sunder his that was thine enemy?
    Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,
    Why art thou yet so fair? shall I believe
    That unsubstantial death is amorous,
    And that the lean abhorred monster keeps
    Thee here in dark to be his paramour?
    For fear of that, I still will stay with thee;
    And never from this palace of dim night
    Depart again: here, here will I remain
    With worms that are thy chamber-maids; O, here
    Will I set up my everlasting rest,
    And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars
    From this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last!
    Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O you
    The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss
    A dateless bargain to engrossing death!
    Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide!
    Thou desperate pilot, now at once run on
    The dashing rocks thy sea-sick weary bark!
    Here’s to my love! [Drinks.] O true apothecary!
    Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die. [Falls.]”

    Paraphrased, this becomes,

    O my love! my wife!
    Death, that took the sweetness from thy breath,
    Had no power to take thy beauty:
    Thou art still beautiful
    There is crimson in thy lips and cheeks,
    And the looks of death haven’t reached there.
    Tybalt lays there in a bloody sheet?
    O, how can I help you,
    Than with the hand that killed thy youth
    To kill his enemy?
    Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,
    Why are you so fair? shall I believe
    That unsubstantial death is romantic,
    And that monster holds
    You here in dark to be his lover?
    I am afraid of that, so I will stay with you;
    And never leave this dark palace
    Depart again: here, here will I remain
    With worms that are your chambermaids; Oh, here
    I’ll set up my forever rest
    And get rid of my bad luck
    From this body. Eyes, look for the last time!
    Arms, hug for the last time! And lips, O you
    The entrance of breath, kiss for the last time
    Set off my death!
    Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavory guide!
    You desperate pilot, go on to
    The rocks and drive our ship into them!
    Here’s to my love! [Drinks] O true apothecary!
    These drugs are quick. So I will die with a kiss [Falls].

    From book to movie, Zeffirelli made many changes. First of all in the book Romeo and Paris fight and Romeo kills Paris, and then goes on to kill himself. In the movie, Paris doesn’t see Romeo before he kills himself. The second difference I noticed had to do with Friar Lawrence. In the book, once everyone finds out about Romeo, Juliet and Paris’s deaths Friar comes forward and tells the whole story. In the movie he doesn’t say anything. This changes the way we see Friar. After the movie I didn’t like him as much I did after the book. The third difference I saw was after Romeo and Juliet’s deaths. In the book Capulet and Montague immediately show up, and in the movie we don’t see them until morning. Out of all these changes I think that Zeffirelli shouldn’t have changed Paris dying, and Friar Lawrence coming forward. Those are two big events and I would have loved to see them in the movie. I don’t think the other change really matters, but the other two really are upsetting me. Why was it necessary to leave out Paris dying? Deaths are usually pretty important. And why does Friar Lawrence all of the sudden have to be a bad guy? I liked him better in the book. It makes me mad.

  17. O my love! my wife!
    Death, that hath suck’d the honey of thy breath,
    Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty:
    Thou art not conquer’d; beauty’s ensign yet
    Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,
    And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.
    Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet?
    O, what more favour can I do to thee,
    Than with that hand that cut thy youth in twain
    To sunder his that was thine enemy?
    Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,
    Why art thou yet so fair? shall I believe
    That unsubstantial death is amorous,
    And that the lean abhorred monster keeps
    Thee here in dark to be his paramour?
    For fear of that, I still will stay with thee;
    And never from this palace of dim night
    Depart again: here, here will I remain
    With worms that are thy chamber-maids; O, here
    Will I set up my everlasting rest,
    And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars
    From this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last!
    Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O you
    The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss
    A dateless bargain to engrossing death!
    Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide!
    Thou desperate pilot, now at once run on
    The dashing rocks thy sea-sick weary bark!
    Here’s to my love! [Drinks.] O true apothecary!
    Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die. [Falls.]

    Paraphrased:
    O my love, my wife, death that took you away,
    Has not yet touched your beauty.
    You are not taken. Betty’s mark still
    Lingers in your lips and your cheeks,
    Death has not yet taken that away.
    Is that Tybalt there?
    O, what can I do better for you
    Than with the hand that killed you too early
    Be used to end my life as well?
    Forgive me Tybalt.–Ah, Juliet,
    Why are you still so fair? Should I believe
    That your death is arousing,
    and that death is keeping you here to be his lover?
    That fear is the reason I will stay with you,
    And never again see out. Here, this is where I will remain
    With the worms that eat at the bodies. O, here
    Is where I will die
    And remove the limits the stars have placed upon my flesh body! Eyes, look your last.
    Arms, take your last embrace. And lips, O, you
    The doors of breath, seal with a kiss
    My death.
    [Kissing Juliet.]
    Come bitter, unsavory death!
    You desperate pilot, go onto the rocks and drive us into them!
    Here’s to my love. [Drinking.] O true apothecary,
    Your poisons are quick. Thus with this kiss, I die.
    [He dies.]

    Quite a few things were left out of the movie that Shakespeare had so carefully planned and written. The dual, the apothecary, and Juliet’s scene full of her doubts. I belive I see a few reasons for this. One is that they are all quite gruesome, having Romeo kills another man, having Juliet not be so brave, and having Romeo be the one to purchase the thing to kill himself even though he isn’t allowed, all show characteristics that we haven’t seen from these characters yet, and that could be left out. Romeo seems all more the tragic hero if he doesn’t kill Paris, although completing Paris’s last wish shows how understanding, and forgiving Romeo truly is. But having him kill another man for the reason that he was just (basically) in the way kind of ruins Romeo’s good traits. And the apothecary scene with Romeo persuading the man to give him the illegal poisons also kind of ruins some of Romeo’s traits. It goes along with how Romeo is so desperate and impulsive but it also shows a darker side to Romeo. It shows him wishing for his death, and that he will do anything to get his wish. Although he treats the man farely and pays him well, it could still be disturbing to see Romeo so frantic and panicked anything nondescript determined to achieve suicide. And then the doubtful scene. This is just truly disgusting. The way Juliet doubts the Friar and imagines all of those repulsive things. It is clear as to why it was not included in the movie. Yet it also shows that Juliet is a person, and that she isn’t use a thing that follows all orders.
    These are are few scenes that were not included in the movie, and it makes sense as to why. All though the scenes show new and good character traits of both Romeo a refund Juliet, the scenes could also be viewed as bad. The scenes could ruin the movie or make it better, and so instead of riskings to ruin the movie, they went along without those scenes.

  18. Romeo’s monologue lines 91-120 paraphrased:

    Oh my love, my wife,
    Death, that has sucked the sweetness out of you,
    Has no idea effect yet on your beauty.
    You are not defeated. Beauty’s flag yet
    Is crimson in your lips and cheeks, And death’s pale flag has not been placed.
    Tybalt lies there in the bloody sheet?
    Oh, what greater favor can I do
    Than with the hand that killed your youth
    Kill me that is your enemy?
    Forgive me cousin.—Ah, dear Juliet,
    Why must you be so beautiful? Should I believe
    That unnecessary death is romantic
    And that the hated monster keeps
    You here in the dark as his own?
    In fear that I will stay with you, and never leave this dim palace,
    Here, I will stay
    With worms that lie with you in this chamber.
    Here, I will set up my death
    And defy the unfair stars,
    From this worn flesh. Eyes, take your last look
    Arms, make your last embrace. Lips,
    the doors of breath, confirm with a kiss a forever bond with death.
    Come, bitter poison, unsavory guide!
    Your desperate pilot, now at once run on
    The dashing rocks that cause a seasick weary man!
    Here’s to my love. Oh true apothecary,
    The poison acts quick. So with this kiss, I die.

    Sadly, we reach the tragic end of Romeo and Juliet’s lives in these scenes we read tonight. An awful ending, if I do say so myself. However, as awful as it may be, it is very important to analyze it to discover meanings and emotions that Romeo may feel. An example of this is when Romeo states out loud that he is to defy the unfair stars and lay down forever next to his Juliet. Romeo’s anguish still has him feeling that it is unfair what has happened to Juliet, and the statement reminds us that really their fate was unfair from the start, being sealed with both of their deaths. Also, Romeo has to prepare himself to die. He is telling his limbs to use themselves for the last time before he drinks the poison, which brings to light hat Romeo really doesn’t want to die. Sure, he is impulsive, so it is not too far fetched that he wants to be with Juliet. However, his motives are to be with Juliet, not actually to die. While they seem all for their deaths, they only end their lives in order to be with each other. Shakespeare conveys to us that death is never wanted or planned. In fact, things go unexpectedly wrong and random in the event that a death may occur. In this play, it was a communication error that has Romeo’s emotions take control of him. When the two married, neither planned on dying in the end of their seemingly-perfect relationship. However, the outcome ends up being so because of the unexpected events that cause them, such as killing Tybalt and missing the letter the Friar sent. The letter then also shows that small events can have very big impacts on future events. Romeo missing that letter is the whole reason why Romeo and Juliet end their lives. It’s almost crazy to imagine that if Romeo had decided to do something in the time frame of fixing his shirt, he would have lived and ended up happily ever after.

  19. Oh, my love, my wife!
    The death that has taken your breath,
    Has not yet taken your beauty
    You are not overtaken; there is still beauty
    In your red lips and in your cheeks,
    Death has not yet paled you here.
    Tybalt, is that you in your bloody shroud?
    Could I commit a better act for you,
    Then, with the hand that cut your life short,
    End the life that was his enemy?
    I am sorry, my cousin. Ah, my Juliet,
    Why are you still beautiful? Should I believe
    That untouchable death is that of love,
    And the strong terrible monster keeps
    You here in the dark so that you may be his glamour?
    Because of this fear, I will stay with you;
    And will never again from the tomb
    Leave again: I will stay here
    With worms crawling in me like chambermaids: In this place
    I will set my final resting place
    And shall pull free the stars of my soul
    From my weary body. My eyes will see the last that they will see!
    My arms are embracing the last they will ever embrace! Lips, as
    The gateway of my breath shall be sealed closed as I seal
    A timeless deal of my own death!
    No matter what comes, even if it is rude conduct or unpleasant guide!
    I, the desperate pilot of a vessel, now crash into
    The destroying rocks with my seasick old ship
    Here’s to my love! Stay true, Apothecary!
    This poison acts fast, so I shall die with a kiss.
    I noticed that, in this soliloquy, Romeo references the stars. When he states “Will I set up my everlasting rest,/And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars” he is stating that he is breaking free from the stars that originally fated Romeo and Juliet to never be together. This keeps true all the way up to the beginning of the play when the prologue states “A pair of star-crossed lovers take their life;” He also compares himself to a seasick ship that is being rammed into the rocks by a weary pilot. In this case, that would make Romeo’s body simply a ship, a carrier, of his much more important soul. So even as his ship would crash as his pilot, his soul will live on without a body. In a way, this would make his soul lost, as most pilots live for the sea and ship, and without it, they are lost. They have no purpose. This shows how truly sorrowful this scene is because Romeo’s soul is now doomed to wander forever.

  20. “O my love! my wife!”
    Oh my love! My wife!
    “Death, that hath suck’d the honey of thy breath,”
    Death has taken the sweetness from your life,
    “Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty:”
    But he has no power on your beauty:
    “Thou art not conquer’d; beauty’s ensign yet”
    You are not taken over; your beauty still remains
    “Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,”
    A red tint is still in your lips and cheeks
    “And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.”
    And death’s presence is not visible there.
    “Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet?”
    Does Tybalt lie there under a death sheet?
    “O, what more favour can I do to thee,”
    Oh, what favor do I owe you,
    “Than with that hand that cut thy youth in twain”
    With my hand that cut your youth in half
    “To sunder his that was thine enemy?”
    To split apart Romeo, who was your enemy?
    “Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,”
    Forgive me, Tybalt! Ah, dear Juliet,
    “Why art thou yet so fair? shall I believe”
    How are you still so beautiful? Should I believe
    “That unsubstantial death is amorous,”
    Your unrealistic death is romantic
    “And that the lean abhorred monster keeps”
    And the cunning disgusting monster keeps
    “Thee here in dark to be his paramour?”
    You here in the dark as his lover?
    “For fear of that, I still will stay with thee;”
    I am afraid of that, so I will stay you;
    “And never from this palace of dim night”
    And I will never from this dark place
    “Depart again: here, here will I remain”
    Leave again: here is where I’ll stay
    “With worms that are thy chamber-maids; O, here”
    Worms will be my servants; Oh, here
    “Will I set up my everlasting rest,”
    I will set up my eternal sleep,
    “And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars”
    And get rid of the idea of unpromised nights
    “From this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last!”
    From this tired skin. My eyes shall take their last sight!
    “Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O you”
    My arms must hug her one last time, and kiss her, Oh you
    “The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss”
    The mouth, closed for a kiss
    “A dateless bargain to engrossing death!”
    An unmeasurable compromise to control death
    “Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide!”
    Come, bitter demeanor, come, despised consciousness!
    “Thou desperate pilot, now at once run on”
    My desperate consciousness, is now racing
    “The dashing rocks thy sea-sick weary bark!”

    To the lovely rocks to the bark!
    “Here’s to my love! [Drinks.] O true apothecary!”
    I’ll drink to my Juliet! [Drinks.] Oh the apothecary was honest!
    “Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die.” [Falls.]
    Your drugs work fast. Like a kiss, I die.

    In Romeo’s speech, he covers many major themes that we’ve discussed in class. He says that Juliet is still lovely, although she is dead. Her lips and cheeks are still crimson, and it looks like death hasn’t touched her beauty. He then notices Tybalt’s corpse. Upon this sight, Romeo asks for forgiveness, and that he owes Tybalt. His focus returns to Juliet, and he asks how she is still so beautiful. He goes on to say that death has taken her life to love her in that dark place. Romeo decides that he too, will die so he can prevent death from loving Juliet. Romeo says that he will stay in that dark place and never leave. Worms will now be accompanying him, and the star crossed skies will no longer plague Romeo and Juliet’s romance. Finally he touches, embraces, and kisses her one last time before he takes his life. Very dark images have been used in this speech, but Romeo makes these images seem weak compared to his love for Juliet, and her light.

  21. Paraphrased:
    O my love! My wife!
    Death, that has taken your breath away,
    Hasn’t taken away your beauty yet:
    You aren’t defeated; There is still beauty
    In your red lips and cheeks,
    Death has not made them pale yet.
    Tybalt, is that you over there in your bloody shroud?
    O, what more can I do for you,
    Than with the hand that killed you at so young
    To kill he who took your youth and your life?
    Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,
    Why are you so beautiful still? Shall I believe
    That death is in love with you,
    And that horrible monster keeps
    You here in the dark to be his lover?
    For fear of that, I will stay with you;
    And never from this dark place
    Shall I leave again: here, here I will remain
    With worms for your chambermaids; O, here
    Will I set up my neverending sleep,
    And forget all of the bad luck
    That has happened to me. Eyes, see your last thing!
    Arms, make your last embrace! And, lips, O you
    The keepers of breath, seal with a righteous kiss
    The deal I have made with death!
    Come, bitter poison, come, unsavoury tool!
    You desperate pilot, let’s crash this sea-weary ship into the rocks!
    Here’s to my love! [Drinks] O honest apothecary!
    Your drug is quick-acting. Here, I die with a kiss. [Falls]

    As we finish Romeo and Juliet, we see some differences between the movie and the text. I missed the last two days of viewing the ending, but it is easy to see how different something is portrayed in person and not on paper. We talked about the importance of stage directions, and how because there are very loose and simple ones here, the director is free to play around with them as they wish. In the movie we see everything much more action packed and at a faster speed. I mentioned at one point the observation that Romeo is never just walking, he’s always sprinting around or lurching to and from places. It is much easier to see the director’s choices and the actor’s choices with how they show the character. I enjoyed reading this play, and even though I have seen it performed many times and read it before, it was still interesting to really dig into the symbols and imagery of the text.

  22. There was a large difference between the ending of the movie and the ending of the book. Paris got to live in the movie, but he was not so lucky in the book. He and Romeo fought and Paris was killed. From how I interpreted it from what I read, I think Paris followed Romeo down to Juliets tomb. But in the movie, Paris is nowhere to be seen in the ending at all. Also Friar Lawrence is much more horrified at Romeo’s death and wants to shield Juliet from the truth. However in the play he tells the truth upfront.
    Romeo:” Oh my love! My dear wife!
    Death has sucked the life from your breath.
    But it has no power to remove your beauty:
    Your beauty has not faded yet
    Your lips and cheeks are scarlet
    The look of death has not come upon you
    Does Tybalt lie here too soaked in blood?
    What can I do to apologize to you,
    Than hurt whom ever cut your life short
    To spilt apart your enemies?
    Accept my apology, dear cousin! Oh my dear Juliet,
    how are you so gorgeous? shall I believe your death is desrieful
    And will the devil keeps you alone here in the dark to be his?
    For that fear, I will remain here;
    An never will I leave from this palace of darkness
    With the evils that lurk here; I will lay my permenant rest
    I should’ve shaken up the unsuccessful stars
    From the world weary, this is the last thing I’ll see!
    Arms, will hold you for the last time! and lips, the doors of life, seal my fate with one kiss, as a deal with death!
    Come unsavory, bitter death!
    Now the desperate guide of death, run me over the rocks.
    Here ‘s to my burning love of Juliet! O the honest apothecary!
    His poison was quick. With this last kiss and I die.”

  23. O my love! my wife!
    Death, that hath suck’d the honey of thy breath,
    Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty:
    Thou art not conquer’d; beauty’s ensign yet
    Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,
    And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.
    Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet?
    O, what more favour can I do to thee,
    Than with that hand that cut thy youth in twain
    To sunder his that was thine enemy?
    Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,
    Why art thou yet so fair? shall I believe
    That unsubstantial death is amorous,
    And that the lean abhorred monster keeps
    Thee here in dark to be his paramour?
    For fear of that, I still will stay with thee;
    And never from this palace of dim night
    Depart again: here, here will I remain
    With worms that are thy chamber-maids; O, here
    Will I set up my everlasting rest,
    And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars
    From this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last!
    Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O you
    The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss
    A dateless bargain to engrossing death!
    Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide!
    Thou desperate pilot, now at once run on
    The dashing rocks thy sea-sick weary bark!
    Here’s to my love! [Drinks.] O true apothecary!
    Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die. [Falls.]

    Oh my love my wife
    Death has taken the aroma of your breath
    You have no power yet by your beauty
    Death has not taken your beauty yet
    There is still red in your lips and cheeks
    And deaths flag has not reached there
    There is Tybalt lying in his bloody sheet
    What more of a favor can I do to you
    Then to take the hand that killed you
    And kill myself who was your enemy
    Forgive me cousin. Oh Juliet
    Why are you still beautiful
    Can I believe that a death without physical affect is possible. And that dark monster keeps you here as a prisoner.
    For the fear of that I will stay with you
    And never depart from this place again
    I will stay here with worms being my chamber maids
    Here I will die.
    And defy the fate of the stars
    From this worried and tired skin my eyes will look at a last time
    Arms take your embrace. Lips take your last kiss
    A dateless bargain to a horrible death
    Come bitter liquid you unsavory guide.
    I am a desperate pilot trying to get past
    The jagged rocks and the seas wave
    Here’s to my love
    What a true apothecary your drugs are quick
    And with a kiss I die
    In this scene we can see the true distress in Romeo.
    He has chosen to die with Juliet and cannot back down. He cannot bear with not having Juliet so he decided to get rid of his own. Instead of contemplating this he looks for the goods he is doing for other people. One of which being Tybalt by being able for him to be avenged. Romeo has been going against and defying the stars for all this play but he finally gave in through a tragic death.

  24. O my love! my wife!
    Death, that hath suck’d the honey of thy breath,
    Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty:
    Thou art not conquer’d; beauty’s ensign yet
    Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,
    And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.
    Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet?
    O, what more favour can I do to thee,
    Than with that hand that cut thy youth in twain
    To sunder his that was thine enemy?
    Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,
    Why art thou yet so fair? shall I believe
    That unsubstantial death is amorous,
    And that the lean abhorred monster keeps
    Thee here in dark to be his paramour?
    For fear of that, I still will stay with thee;
    And never from this palace of dim night
    Depart again: here, here will I remain
    With worms that are thy chamber-maids; O, here
    Will I set up my everlasting rest,
    And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars
    From this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last!
    Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O you
    The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss
    A dateless bargain to engrossing death!
    Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide!
    Thou desperate pilot, now at once run on
    The dashing rocks thy sea-sick weary bark!
    Here’s to my love! [Drinks.] O true apothecary!
    Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die. [Falls.]

    Paraphrasing:
    My wife! my love!
    Death that has sucked the honey of your breath
    Has had no power on your beauty yet

    This shows how much Romeo and Juliet are devoted to each other, and how much they love each other. They really have a passion for each other that is really important to this plot.

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