Come, vial.

Tonight, please read Act II, scenes i, ii, AND iii .  Then, please paraphrase and analyze the “Come, Vial” speech.  After your paraphase, analyze how Juliet has changed over the course of the play so far.

Come, vial.
What if this mixture do not work at all?
Shall I be married then to-morrow morning?
No, no: this shall forbid it: lie thou there.

(Laying down her dagger)

What if it be a poison, which the friar
Subtly hath minister’d to have me dead,
Lest in this marriage he should be dishonour’d,
Because he married me before to Romeo?
I fear it is: and yet, methinks, it should not,
For he hath still been tried a holy man.
How if, when I am laid into the tomb,
I wake before the time that Romeo
Come to redeem me? there’s a fearful point!
Shall I not, then, be stifled in the vault,
To whose foul mouth no healthsome air breathes in,
And there die strangled ere my Romeo comes?
Or, if I live, is it not very like,
The horrible conceit of death and night,
Together with the terror of the place,–
As in a vault, an ancient receptacle,
Where, for these many hundred years, the bones
Of all my buried ancestors are packed:
Where bloody Tybalt, yet but green in earth,
Lies festering in his shroud; where, as they say,
At some hours in the night spirits resort;–
Alack, alack, is it not like that I,
So early waking, what with loathsome smells,
And shrieks like mandrakes’ torn out of the earth,
That living mortals, hearing them, run mad:–
O, if I wake, shall I not be distraught,
Environed with all these hideous fears?
And madly play with my forefather’s joints?
And pluck the mangled Tybalt from his shroud?
And, in this rage, with some great kinsman’s bone,
As with a club, dash out my desperate brains?
O, look! methinks I see my cousin’s ghost
Seeking out Romeo, that did spit his body
Upon a rapier’s point: stay, Tybalt, stay!
Romeo, I come! this do I drink to thee.

(She falls upon her bed, within the curtains.)

R&J blog #13

34 thoughts on “Come, vial.

  1. In tonight’s reading of Romeo and Juliet, Juliet realizes she will soon have to marry Paris. She goes to the Friar to seek guidance, and he gives her a vial of a potion that will give her the symptoms if death. She says,

    “Come, vial.
    What if this mixture do not work at all?
    Shall I be married then to-morrow morning?
    No, no: this shall forbid it: lie thou there.
    Laying down her dagger
    What if it be a poison, which the friar
    Subtly hath minister’d to have me dead,
    Lest in this marriage he should be dishonour’d,
    Because he married me before to Romeo?
    I fear it is: and yet, methinks, it should not,
    For he hath still been tried a holy man.
    How if, when I am laid into the tomb,
    I wake before the time that Romeo
    Come to redeem me? there’s a fearful point!
    Shall I not, then, be stifled in the vault,
    To whose foul mouth no healthsome air breathes in,
    And there die strangled ere my Romeo comes?
    Or, if I live, is it not very like,
    The horrible conceit of death and night,
    Together with the terror of the place,–
    As in a vault, an ancient receptacle,
    Where, for these many hundred years, the bones
    Of all my buried ancestors are packed:
    Where bloody Tybalt, yet but green in earth,
    Lies festering in his shroud; where, as they say,
    At some hours in the night spirits resort;–
    Alack, alack, is it not like that I,
    So early waking, what with loathsome smells,
    And shrieks like mandrakes’ torn out of the earth,
    That living mortals, hearing them, run mad:–
    O, if I wake, shall I not be distraught,
    Environed with all these hideous fears?
    And madly play with my forefather’s joints?
    And pluck the mangled Tybalt from his shroud?
    And, in this rage, with some great kinsman’s bone,
    As with a club, dash out my desperate brains?
    O, look! methinks I see my cousin’s ghost
    Seeking out Romeo, that did spit his body
    Upon a rapier’s point: stay, Tybalt, stay!
    Romeo, I come! this do I drink to thee.” (ll. 21-60, pages 191-192)

    When paraphrased, it became:

    “Come vial.
    What if this mixture doesn’t work?
    Will I be married then tomorrow morning?
    No, no, this should work. Stay there.
    (Laying down her dagger)
    What if its a poison that the friar
    Has given me to kill me,
    Is it because he would be disgraced,
    Because he already married me to Romeo?
    I fear it is: Yet I don’t think so,
    Because he is a holy and trustworthy man.
    What if, when I’m put in the tomb,
    I awake before Romeo
    Comes for me. That’s a scary point!
    Won’t I be stifled in the tomb,
    Where there, no healthy air goes,
    And there died strangled before my Romeo comes?
    or, if I live, it will be as if,
    I’m surrounded by darkness and despair,
    Together with that,
    As in a vault,
    Where, for these many hundred years, the bones
    Of all my ancestors are:
    Where Tybalt, freshly dead,
    Lies rotting in the shroud; where, as they say,
    During the night, there are spirits in those tombs,
    Oh no, oh no, I will wake up,
    Early to awful smells,
    And awful sounds like mandrakes torn from the ground,
    That living people who, hear them will become mad:
    Oh, if I wake up, won’t I be distraught,
    Stuck with all those scary things?
    I’ll start playing with my forefathers joints?
    And pull Tybalt out of his burial shroud?
    And in this mood, will I pull one of my ancestors great bones,
    And use it as a club to knock out my brains?
    O look! I think I see my cousin’s ghost
    Looking for Romeo, who did impale him
    On a swords blade: Wait, Tybalt, wait!
    Romeo, I’m coming. I drink to you!”

    I found this extended passage to be interesting in describing Juliet’s change. She is now a dynamic character, as at first she was young and immature, yet now seems older and more cunning. At first, she seems so young as she loves Romeo without really taking into account the context. She almost doesn’t see the risks, blinded by affection. But here, she is wiser. Before taking the draft, she assesses the risks and rewards and makes a calculated decision. She realizes that this potion will cause her to go down to vault, where she will almost certainly be disturbed. She chooses, however, to take the drink as it will allow her to see her love once more. So, what caused this change? I think her transforming was a result of Tybalt’s death. It showed Juliet that her love was not a game, and people could actually get hurt. Thus, she chose to get her wits about her and move ahead. Overall, I found this reading interesting and helpful in developing Juliet’s character.

  2. Come, vial. (holds out the vial)
    Here’s the vial.
    What if this mixture do not work at all?
    What if this doesn’t work?
    Shall I be married then tomorrow morning?
    Will I be married tomorrow morning?
    No, no. This shall forbid it. Lie thou there.
    (lays her knife down)
    No, this will stop it. Lie there (talking to knife)
    What if it be a poison, which the friar
    What if it’s poison, that the friar
    Subtly hath ministered to have me dead,
    Gave me to kill me,
    Lest in this marriage he should be dishonored
    To prevent being dishonored
    Because he married me before to Romeo?
    Because he married me to Romeo?
    I fear it is. And yet, methinks, it should not,
    I’m afraid he did. But, I think, that’s not true,
    For he hath still been tried a holy man.
    Because he is a holy man.
    How if, when I am laid into the tomb,
    What if, when I’m laid in the tomb,
    I wake before the time that Romeo
    I wake up before Romeo
    Come to redeem me? There’s a fearful point.
    Get there to save me? This is what I’m scared of.
    Shall I not, then, be stifled in the vault
    What if I suffocate in the vault
    To whose foul mouth no healthsome air breathes in,
    Because there is no clean air to breath
    And there die strangled ere my Romeo comes?
    And I die before Romeo comes?
    Or, if I live, is it not very like
    Or, if I live, which isn’t likely
    The horrible conceit of death and night,
    The horrible deaths and the darkness,
    Together with the terror of the place—
    With the terror of the place–
    As in a vault, an ancient receptacle,
    As the vault, an old container,
    Where for these many hundred years the bones
    Where for hundreds of years the bones,
    Of all my buried ancestors are packed;
    Of my ancestors are packed;
    Where bloody Tybalt, yet but green in earth,
    Where Tybalt, newly dead,
    Lies festering in his shroud; where, as they say,
    Lies there decaying in his suit; when, as they say,
    At some hours in the night spirits resort—?
    Sometimes in the night ghosts come-?
    Alack, alack, is it not like that I,
    No, no, if it’s like that,
    So early waking, what with loathsome smells,
    When I wake, the terrible smells,
    And shrieks like mandrakes torn out of the earth,
    And screams like people
    That living mortals, hearing them, run mad—?
    That sound like they are running mad–?
    Oh, if I wake, shall I not be distraught,
    Oh, if I wake up, I will be scared
    Environèd with all these hideous fears,
    Surrounded by all these fears,
    And madly play with my forefather’s joints,
    I’ll go mad and start playing with my ancestor’s joints
    And pluck the mangled Tybalt from his shroud,
    And take Tybalt out of his suit,
    And, in this rage, with some great kinsman’s bone,
    And, in this rage, with a bone,
    As with a club, dash out my desperate brains?
    As with a club, bash my brains?
    Oh, look! Methinks I see my cousin’s ghost
    Oh, I think I see my cousin’s ghost
    Seeking out Romeo, that did spit his body
    Looking for Romeo, who killed him
    Upon a rapier’s point. Stay, Tybalt, stay!
    With a sword. Wait, Tybalt, wait!
    Romeo, Romeo, Romeo! Here’s drink. I drink to thee.
    Romeo, I drink to you.
    Juliet has changed a lot in the two days course of the play. In the Beginning, she is timid about marriage and says she will only go as far as her mother lets her. Then she meets Romeo at the party later that night and we see her change already. She kisses Romeo and finds out he is a Montague. Later that night, Romeo stalks her and overhears her talking about him. He reveals himself and they agree that the love each other and want to get married. The next day they get married. She went from not even thinking about marriage to getting married the next day. Then the fight happens and we see how Juliet stays true to Romeo. That night they seal their marriage. The next day Romeo leaves and she is told she will marry Paris. She goes to the friar for help and says she will kill herself if she can’t be with Romeo. They come up with a plan that Juliet will drink a poison that will make her go to sleep and then when she is in the tomb she will awaken. Then Romeo will save her and they will live happily ever after. So, as we can see, she changes a lot over the course of like three days.

    • Great job! You showed a great understanding of the text. I forgot about how Juliet said in the beginning that she will let her mother control her marriage, thank you for reminding me about that. Keep up the great work!

  3. In tonights reading of Romeo and Juliet, by William Shakespeare, Juliet and Friar Laurence set up a plan. Friar who gives her poison to drink which would put her to sleep for a while and then when her family will declare her as dead, Romeo will take her so they can be together. Juliet has her doubts and says, “Come, vial.What if this mixture do not work at all?Shall I be married then to-morrow morning?No, no: this shall forbid it: lie thou there. (Laying down her dagger) What if it be a poison, which the friar Subtly hath minister’d to have me dead,Lest in this marriage he should be dishonour’d,Because he married me before to Romeo?I fear it is: and yet, methinks, it should not, For he hath still been tried a holy man.How if, when I am laid into the tomb,I wake before the time that Romeo Come to redeem me? there’s a fearful point!Shall I not, then, be stifled in the vault,To whose foul mouth no healthsome air breathes in,And there die strangled ere my Romeo comes?Or, if I live, is it not very like,The horrible conceit of death and night,Together with the terror of the place,–As in a vault, an ancient receptacle,Where, for these many hundred years, the bones Of all my buried ancestors are packed:Where bloody Tybalt, yet but green in earth,Lies festering in his shroud; where, as they say,At some hours in the night spirits resort;–Alack, alack, is it not like that I,So early waking, what with loathsome smells,And shrieks like mandrakes’ torn out of the earth,That living mortals, hearing them, run mad:–O, if I wake, shall I not be istraught,Environed with all these hideous fears?And madly play with my forefather’s joints?And pluck the mangled Tybalt from his shroud?And, in this rage, with some great kinsman’s bone,As with a club, dash out my desperate brains?O, look! methinks I see my cousin’s ghost Seeking out Romeo, that did spit his body Upon a rapier’s point: stay, Tybalt, stay!Romeo, I come! this do I drink to thee. (she falls upon her bed, within the curtains.)” This can be translated to, Here’s the vial. What if this mixture doesn’t work at all? Will I be married tomorrow morning? No, no, I won’t let that happen: lie down here.What if the Friar Lawrence changed the potion to one that will kill me? Is he worried that he will be disgraced if I marry Paris even though he already married me to Romeo? I’m afraid this is true. And yet, it shouldn’t be poison because he is a trustworthy holy man. What if I wake up in the tomb before Romeo comes to save me? That’s a frightening idea. Will I suffocate in the tomb? There’s no healthy air to breathe in there. Will I die before Romeo comes? Or if I live, I’ll be surrounded by death and darkness. It will be terrible. There will be my ancestors bones that are hundreds of years old in that tomb. Tybalt’s body will be in there, and his corpse will be rotting. During the night the spirits are in tombs. Oh no, oh no. I’ll wake up and Tybalt will get revenge on Romeo. Tybalt stay dead, Romeo I will get you by drinking this.
    Juliet has changed from the beginning and I think she even recognizes it a bit. When she said that Tybalt should stay, I think of it as her saying let my past self stay in the past with Tybalt, while Romeo and my new self will create a future. Today in school, we had an assembly fifth and sixth period and in that assembly, the speaker said that the people that surround you can change you for better or for worse and I think that when Juliet surrounds herself with Romeo, she is slightly turning into him. Although everyone says that Juliet has changed a lot, she still has that voice in her head that makes her nervous and fearful. Juliet proved that to us in this speech, but she also showed us how she changed to be more risk taking and brave. These two characteristics can be seen in Romeo which goes back to the thought that the people who surround you can shape you.

    • I enjoyed reading your blog. A large number of parts from your summary were different than my summary, and it is interesting to see another view. Overall, you had a great blog and if I had to make a suggestion, maybe improve the spacing between sentences in some areas.

  4. (Beginning)
    Here, vial.
    What if this potion doesn’t work?
    Then, will I have to get married tomorrow morning?
    No, this cannot happen: lay there knife
    (Laying down her dagger)
    What if this vial contains a poison, which the friar
    Sneakily is giving to me to kill me,
    Otherwise, my marriage will lower him,
    Since he already married me to Romeo?
    I am afraid of that: and yet I don’t think I should be afraid,
    Because the friar is a religious man.
    (Middle 1)
    What if, when I am buried in my tomb,
    I wake up before Romeo
    Is able to rescue me? That is a scary idea!
    Then, won’t I suffocate in the tomb?
    Where there is no clean air to breathe,
    Will I die before Romeo arrives?
    Or, if I survive, isn’t the tomb similar,
    To the terror of darkness and death,
    Along with the horror of the tomb,-
    As the old vault,
    Has contained for many hundred years, the bones
    Of all my deceased ancestors are inside:
    (Middle 2)
    Where the fresh bloody body of Tybalt,
    Will lay rotting in his shroud: In where they say,
    Sometimes, the spirits of the night reside in;-
    Sadly, alas, when I,
    Wake up early, the horrible odors,
    And the terrible screams like mandrakes’ taken from the ground,
    That, when heard by mortals, make them go crazy:-
    Oh, if I do wake up, won’t I be terrified,
    Surrounded by all of these frightening things?
    And crazily play with my ancestors’ bones?
    And take out the damaged body of Tybalt from his shroud?
    In this madness, with some large ancestors bone,
    Like a club, desperately hit myself?
    (End)
    Look, I think I see my cousin’s ghost
    Trying to find Romeo, who killed him
    Upon the point of a sword: don’t find Romeo, Tybalt!
    To Romeo, I go! I drink this to you.

    I split this text into 4 major parts based on what Juliet is doing at the time. The fears get worse and worse and eventually begin to influence Juliet’s vision. At the end of the soliloquy, Juliet decides to drink the contents of the vial for Romeo. Juliet has dramatically changed throughout the play. She originally was someone who would only love as much as her mother’s consent would allow. Now, Juliet would fake her death for her secretly married banished husband. After Juliet met Romeo, she endured a drastic change. Juliet was originally someone who always listened to her parents and always obeyed instructions. After she first met Romeo, Juliet needed to break some of her family’s laws in order to meet with Romeo again. Juliet slowly became accustomed to breaking more and more laws. Momentarily, she is completely ensnared by Romeo and will do anything to meet her husband. Juliet has developed into a determined, crafty and daring person who is unafraid of breaking laws as long as she gets what she wants. Juliet still is physically controlled by her parents but isn’t mentally so. I feel sorry for Lord Capulet and Lady Capulet, who have officially lost their only daughter to their cousin’s murderer.

    • Great blog! I love how you compared the former Juliet who would never do anything to upset her parents to the Juliet that is now willing to pretend to kill herself to be with her family’s enemy. Good paraphrasing. Keep up the good work! 🙂

      • Good job Devan! I liked how you organized your paraphrasing. Also, at the end of your blog, I liked how you looked at it from Capulet and Lady Capulet’s perspective.

  5. “Come,vial
    What if this mixture is not effective at all?
    Will I be married tomorrow morning?
    No, no, this shall stop it. Stay here.
    What if it is poison that the Friar
    Slyly gave to kill me,
    For in our marriage he would be dishonored
    I’m afraid. And yet I don’t think so,
    Because he is a holy man.
    What if, when I am placed in the tomb,
    I wake up before Romeo
    Comes to get me? That’s a scary idea.
    Will I not then be put in a vault,
    Where disgusting mouths breath unhealthy air,
    And die there of suffocation waiting for Romeo?
    Or, if I survive, it is not like
    The horrible image of death and night,
    Added with the terror of the place-
    As in a vault, an old container
    Where for hundreds of years the remains
    Of my buried ancestors are full of;
    Where bloody Tybalt, recently placed there,
    Lies rotting in his shroud; where, as people say,
    At some time during the night spirits come out-
    No, no, I will not be like that,
    I will wake early, with those horrible smells,
    And screams like mandrakes ripped from the ground,
    That humans, hearing them, fo mad-
    Oh, if I wake up won’t I be upset,
    Surrounded with all these terrible horrors,
    And madly play with my ancestors joint,
    And pull the disfigured Tybalt out of his shroud,
    And, in this madness, with some great relative’s bone,
    Like a club, dash out my desperate brains?
    Oh look, I think I see my cousin’s ghost
    Seeking Romeo that killed him
    On a sword’s point! Stay, Tybalt, stay!
    Romeo, Romeo, Romeo! I drink. I drink to
    You.

    Juliet has clearly changed from the beginning of the book up until now. Juliet has become more impulsive and daring. At first, she was just a girl in love, but now she will do anything, even kill herself, than be with anyone except Romeo. She threatened to jump off a tower as long as she didn’t marry Paris. Juliet is taking a big chance at drinking Friar Lawrence’s remedy. Although Juliet is very young, only thirteen, she acts like a mature woman. She is very clever with how she addresses her parents after her encounter with Friar Lawrence, and even though she is impulsive, she contains her desire to be with Romeo. If she would not have contained her want, she could have drank the vial early, and that would have jeopardized their whole plan. Juliet has changed and matured very much throughout this play.

  6. Juliet speaks a long and meaningful speech to herself before drinking a concoction that she wants to end her misery.

    Come vial,
    What if this potion doesn’t work?
    Then I’ll have to be married tomorrow?
    No, this potion will work for me, Lie it there.
    What if it’s a poison that the Friar
    Secretly made to kill me,
    In my marriage he should be ashamed
    Because he had already married me to Romeo?
    I hope it’s not. I don’t think it is
    Because the Friar is a holy man.
    How if, when I am dead
    I die before Romeo is able
    To see me? That is a bad thought.
    I will not be kept in the dark
    To a bad mouth where no good air goes
    And die before my savior Romeo comes?
    Or, I might live, though I probably won’t
    The horrible concept of death and night
    Combined with the scariness of the place
    As in a room, the old space
    Where the bones of all my ancestors
    Have layed for hundreds of years
    Where my cousin Tybalt, green in the Earth
    Lies rotting in his clothes, where, as they say
    At some hours the spirits come out
    No, no, I will not be like that
    Cause I wake up early, with bad smells
    And screams likes animals torn out of the ground
    That humans go crazy when they hear them
    Or, if I survive, I will not be sad
    With all these horrific fears
    And I’ll touch my ancestors bodies
    And take the clothes off from Tybalt’s body
    And, while I am angry, with my ancestors’ bone
    And use it to hit my brains out of my head
    Look, now I think I see Tybalt’s ghost
    Looking for Romeo, who killed him
    With a sword drawn. Tybalt, please stay
    Romeo, Romeo, Romeo! I will drink for you now.

    Her parents were very angry at the way that she acted when they said that she was to marry Paris. Juliet doesn’t love Paris, and is only in love with Romeo, who she cannot be with. So, she decides that the only way to numb her pain is to stop it forever and kill herself. When she and Paris meet at the Friar’s house, Paris tries to convice her to be in love with him. But, she would never be able to deattach herself from Romeo, and states that she would never marry him. Then, she goes on to tell the Friar about her plans, and surprisingly, the Friar helps her commit suicide. He gives her a mixture that he says will kill her, and tells her to drink it. Juliet goes home, and Juliet seemed to be very excited and ready to commit suicide. She pretends that she had changed her mind and was okay with marrying Paris, only her parents didn’t know what she was really happy about. But, when she is ready to actually drink the vial, she thinks about everything that could go wrong and hesitates slightly. She thinks about the Friar’s possible motivation in giving her the vial, she thinks about the possibility of it not working, and also thinks about if she wakes up in the tomb with her dead ancestors and is still alive. Juliet was extremely impulsive in these scenes, but in the end, she actually takes some moments to think about what she is about to do. But, her mind isn’t changed, and she ends up drinking the vial, hoping that it will end her life.

  7. In Act iv, scene i-iii of Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare, Juliet faces the reality that she must marry Paris. While seeking guidance from Friar Lawrence, he opts to give her a sleeping potion to take on Wednesday night before the wedding, which would make her appear to be dead for 42 hours. During this time her body will rest in the family tomb, and it would prevent the marriage to Paris. Juliet says:

    Come, vial.
    What if this mixture do not work at all?
    Shall I be married then to-morrow morning?
    No, no: this shall forbid it: lie thou there.
    (Laying down her dagger)
    What if it be a poison, which the friar
    Subtly hath minister’d to have me dead,
    Lest in this marriage he should be dishonour’d,
    Because he married me before to Romeo?
    I fear it is: and yet, methinks, it should not,
    For he hath still been tried a holy man.
    How if, when I am laid into the tomb,
    I wake before the time that Romeo
    Come to redeem me? there’s a fearful point!
    Shall I not, then, be stifled in the vault,
    To whose foul mouth no healthsome air breathes in,
    And there die strangled ere my Romeo comes?
    Or, if I live, is it not very like,
    The horrible conceit of death and night,
    Together with the terror of the place,–
    As in a vault, an ancient receptacle,
    Where, for these many hundred years, the bones
    Of all my buried ancestors are packed:
    Where bloody Tybalt, yet but green in earth,
    Lies festering in his shroud; where, as they say,
    At some hours in the night spirits resort;–
    Alack, alack, is it not like that I,
    So early waking, what with loathsome smells,
    And shrieks like mandrakes’ torn out of the earth,
    That living mortals, hearing them, run mad:–
    O, if I wake, shall I not be distraught,
    Environed with all these hideous fears?
    And madly play with my forefather’s joints?
    And pluck the mangled Tybalt from his shroud?
    And, in this rage, with some great kinsman’s bone,
    As with a club, dash out my desperate brains?
    O, look! methinks I see my cousin’s ghost
    Seeking out Romeo, that did spit his body
    Upon a rapier’s point: stay, Tybalt, stay!
    Romeo, I come! this do I drink to thee.

    Paraphrased:
    Here’s the vial.
    What if this mixture doesn’t work at all?
    Will I still be married tomorrow morning?
    No, no, this knife will stop it. Lie down right there.
    (she lays down the knife)
    What if the Friar mixed the potion to kill me?
    Is he worried that he will be disgraced
    if I marry Paris after he married me to Romeo?
    I’m afraid that it’s poison. And yet, it shouldn’t be poison
    because he is a trustworthy holy man.
    What if, when I am put in the tomb,
    I wake up before Romeo comes to save me?
    That’s a frightening idea.
    Won’t I suffocate in the tomb?
    There’s no healthy air to breathe in there.
    Will I die of suffocation before Romeo comes?
    Or if I live, I’ll be surrounded by death and darkness.
    It will be terrible.
    With the terror of the tomb
    Where it is ancient and replicated as so
    There will be bones hundreds of years old in that tomb,
    Of my ancestors’ bones.
    Tybalt’s body will be in there, freshly buried,
    and his body will be rotting.
    They say that during the night the spirits are in tombs.
    Oh no, oh no. I’ll wake up
    and smell awful odors.
    I’ll hear screams
    that would drive people crazy.
    If I wake up too early, won’t I go insane
    with all these horrible, frightening things around me,
    start playing with my ancestors’ bones,
    and pull Tybalt’s corpse out of his death shroud?
    Will I grab one of my dead ancestors’ bones
    and bash in my own skull?
    Oh, look! I think I see my cousin Tybalt’s ghost.
    He’s looking for Romeo because Romeo killed him with his sword.
    Upon a swords point: Wait, Tybalt, wait!
    Romeo! Here’s a drink. I drink to you.

    This passage was very interesting and significant to this story. It is evident that Juliet is changing, making her a dynamic character. At first, she was very irresponsible and immature which came with her young age. Now, she has blossomed into an older, more intelligent and mature woman, that considers negative factors in certain situations. Before her change, she was head over heels in love with Romeo and didn’t think or care about anything else. She was blinded by love and couldn’t see anything else. However, now, it is clear that she is different by being more intelligent. She examines pros and cons, while also considering negative effects of her situation. This is new for Juliet, who realizes that there needed to be some change after the death of Tybalt. I wonder if Juliet will change more, or if any other character will see a change. I hope to read more and learn more about Romeo, Juliet, and their everlasting love story.

  8. Here is the vial.
    What if the mixture does not work?
    Will I then have to marry Paris tomorrow morning?
    No, no. This shall prevent it. I’ll set it here.
    What if the vial is a poison, that the friar
    created to kill me,
    for this marriage dishonors him,
    because he already married me to Romeo?
    I am scared that this is true, but it is not.
    The friar is a holy man.
    What if, I am put into a tomb,
    and I wake up before Romeo
    comes to take me away? That’s a scary idea.
    Shall I not, then be suffocating in the vault
    my mouth will not have healthy air to breathe in,
    will I die of suffocation before my Romeo comes?
    Or, if I live,
    horrible death and darkness will surround me,
    all together with the terror
    The vault is an ancient container
    For hundred years old bones lie inside
    The remains of all my buried ancestors,
    Where bloody Tybalt’s body lies, new to the vault,
    lies rotting; People say
    that at some hours in the night the spirits come out
    Oh no, oh no, I will not be like that,
    I’ll wake up and smell awful smells,
    I’ll hear shrieks like mandrakes torn out of the ground,
    Hearing it will make people crazy
    Oh, if I wake up, I will not be worried
    with all the hideous fears,
    and I’ll play with the ancestor’s bones,
    and pull Tyablt out from his shroud,
    and with a great ancestor’s bone,
    I’ll hit my desperate brains
    Oh look! I think I see my cousin’s ghost
    Looking for Romeo, who killed him
    with his sword. Stay, Tybalt, stay!
    Romeo, Romeo, Romeo! I drink for you.

    Juliet has really changed from the start of the novel. From this speech, I can really see that she has become more wiser, and less of a child. Before, all she did was love Romeo, and always think about him. Now, she is thinking about all the consequences, and all the bad things that can happen. She notices that their relationship isn’t perfect, and really thinks about what she is about to do. One of the things about Juliet that really struck in the beginning of the novel was her impulsiveness. She falls in love with Romeo and marries him the next morning. However, in this moment, she is less impulsive, and really thinks about her situation. She really takes her time thinking, before taking her move: drinking the vial.

  9. In Act iv, scenes i-iii, we read of Juliet’s process of finding out her solution to her dilemma. She goes to Friar Lawrence for his input. He gives her a potion to drink and she would die. She says the following,

    Come, vial.
    What if this mixture do not work at all?- What if this does not work at all?
    Shall I be married then to-morrow morning?- Will I be married tomorrow morning?
    No, no: this shall forbid it: lie thou there.- No, the knife will forbid it
    What if it be a poison, which the friar- What if it is a poison
    Subtly hath minister’d to have me dead,- that he ministered to have me dead
    Lest in this marriage he should be dishonour’d- Will he be disgraced
    ,Because he married me before to Romeo?- because he married me to Romeo?
    I fear it is: and yet, methinks, it should not,- I fear it is, but I don’t think so
    For he hath still been tried a holy man.- for he is a holy man
    How if, when I am laid into the tomb- What if when I am laid in the tomb?
    ,I wake before the time that Romeo- Romeo comes to save me
    Come to redeem me? there’s a fearful point!- Thats fearful!
    Shall I not, then, be stifled in the vault,- Won’t I be suffocated?
    To whose foul mouth no healthsome air breathes in,- There is no healthy air
    And there die strangled ere my Romeo comes?- Will I die before Romeo comes?
    Or, if I live, is it not very like,- If I live,
    The horrible conceit of death and night,- I will be surrounded by darkness
    Together with the terror of the place,– It will be very terrifying
    As in a vault, an ancient receptacle,- In an ancient tomb
    Where, for these many hundred years, the bones- With bones, hundreds of years old
    Of all my buried ancestors are packed:- where my ancestors are buried
    Where bloody Tybalt, yet but green in earth,- where my cousin Tybalt is freshly buried
    Lies festering in his shroud; where, as they say,- rotting in his tomb
    At some hours in the night spirits resort;– in the night, the spirits arise
    Alack, alack, is it not like that I,- and
    So early waking, what with loathsome smells,- I will wake up to horrible smells
    And shrieks like mandrakes’ torn out of the earth,- And horrible screams
    That living mortals, hearing them, run mad:– when humans hear them, they will go mad
    O, if I wake, shall I not be distraught,- And if I wake up, will I not be distraught,
    Environed with all these hideous fears?- With all of these nightmares
    And madly play with my forefather’s joints?- And play with my ancestor’s bones?
    And pluck the mangled Tybalt from his shroud?- And pull Tybalt out of his grave?
    And, in this rage, with some great kinsman’s bone,- With a strong bone,
    As with a club, dash out my desperate brains?- Will I hit my brain?
    O, look! methinks I see my cousin’s ghost- I think I see Tybalt
    Seeking out Romeo, that did spit his body- Looking for Romeo who stabbed him.
    Upon a rapier’s point: stay, Tybalt, stay!- Wait Tybalt!
    Romeo, I come! this do I drink to thee.- Romeo, lets drink to you!

    Throughout this entire book, Juliet has changed immensely. She once went to a little girl telling her mother that she would love her husband only as much as her mother told her to do so to a grown woman in love, attempting “suicide” to avoid marriage. Juliet has grown as a woman. Many people blogged saying that Juliet is mature because she thought about her decision and she was being mature about the situation. She was still faking her death. I don’t think that was the only option. However, other than that small point, I do believe that Juliet has grown as a woman. She is responsible and thinks rationally. From the beginning of the book to now, she has always been rational. Unless she is with Romeo. Romeo brings out her wild and care free side, where she can express herself and love Romeo with all her heart. I am anxious to read about Romeo’s perspective when he comes back to Verona.

    • Nice job, Anjali. I agree that Juliet was once a rational and responsible woman, but after meeting Romeo, she has lost all those characteristics. She now seems very impulsive and rash. Keep up the great work.

  10. Juliet’s speech paraphrased:

    Come, vial
    What if this concoction doesn’t work at all?
    Will I then be married tomorrow morning?
    No, no: this will not allow it: lie there.
    What if it is a poison, which the friar
    Has subtly administered to kill me
    Does he attempt to avoid dishonor
    Because he already married me to Romeo?
    I fear that is the case: and yet, I think, it is not,
    For he has been proved a holy man
    What if, when I am laid in tho the tomb,
    I wake up before Romeo
    Comes to save me? That’s a scary thought!
    Will I not, then, be suffocated in the vault
    From a foul mouth that breaths no healthy air in
    And there die suffocated before my Romeo arrives?
    Or, if I live, is it not very similar
    The horror of all the dead and darkness
    Along with the terror of the place
    As in a vault, an ancient container
    Where, for these centuries, the bones
    Of all my buried ancestors are packed:
    Where blood-stained Tybalt, now part of the ground
    Lies rotting; where, as they say,
    At times at night spirits are around
    Oh no, oh no, is it not like that?
    If I wake up early, I will do so with repulsive odors
    And shrieks like mandrakes being torn out of the earth
    That regular people that hear them will run mad:-
    Oh, if I wake up, will I not be distressed,
    Surrounded by all these fearful and hideous things?
    And play with my ancestor’s joints while I am insane?
    And remove the disfigured Tybalt from his shroud?
    And, in my insanity, with some great relative’s bone,
    Like a club, bash my desperate head?
    Oh, look! I think I see my cousin’s ghost
    Looking for Romeo, who skewered him
    On a rapier’s point: stay, Tybalt, stay!
    Romeo, I come! I drink this to you.

    So far in the play, Juliet’s characteristics and ways of acting have changed. In the beginning, Juliet obeys whatever her mother says. She doesn’t do anything that would distinguish herself as someone defiant, stubborn, or bold. When Lady Capulet asks her if she would like to married, Juliet tells her she would only do so much as she allows her. However, after she meets Romeo, all of this changes. Now, when she is told she is engaged to Paris, she throws a tantrum and cries and bawls, while Lord Capulet becomes furious with her. Their relationship causes her to do anything to stop being married to Paris, and to be with Romeo. Juliet’s intentions have become so extreme that she wants to feign death to her family. She even drinks a strange vial from the Friar that could possibly poison her, and plans to kill herself if all fails. In conclusion, Juliet went from being a timid, obedient person to a bold and defiant one.

  11. Come, vial.
    What if this mixture do not work at all?
    Shall I be married then to-morrow morning?
    No, no: this shall forbid it: lie thou there.
    (Laying down her dagger)

    What if it be a poison, which the friar
    Subtly hath minister’d to have me dead,
    Lest in this marriage he should be dishonour’d,
    Because he married me before to Romeo?
    I fear it is: and yet, methinks, it should not,
    For he hath still been tried a holy man.
    How if, when I am laid into the tomb,
    I wake before the time that Romeo
    Come to redeem me? there’s a fearful point!
    Shall I not, then, be stifled in the vault,
    To whose foul mouth no healthsome air breathes in,
    And there die strangled ere my Romeo comes?
    Or, if I live, is it not very like,
    The horrible conceit of death and night,
    Together with the terror of the place,–
    As in a vault, an ancient receptacle,
    Where, for these many hundred years, the bones
    Of all my buried ancestors are packed:
    Where bloody Tybalt, yet but green in earth,
    Lies festering in his shroud; where, as they say,
    At some hours in the night spirits resort;–
    Alack, alack, is it not like that I,
    So early waking, what with loathsome smells,
    And shrieks like mandrakes’ torn out of the earth,
    That living mortals, hearing them, run mad:–
    O, if I wake, shall I not be distraught,
    Environed with all these hideous fears?
    And madly play with my forefather’s joints?
    And pluck the mangled Tybalt from his shroud?
    And, in this rage, with some great kinsman’s bone,
    As with a club, dash out my desperate brains?
    O, look! methinks I see my cousin’s ghost
    Seeking out Romeo, that did spit his body
    Upon a rapier’s point: stay, Tybalt, stay!
    Romeo, I come! this do I drink to thee.
    (She falls upon her bed, within the curtains.)

    My paraphrased version:
    Come, vial.
    What if potion doesn’t work?
    Will I have to marry Paris?
    Nah, it will work.
    (Lays down her dagger)
    What if this potion turns out to be a poison that the friar
    gave me so that I die
    Is it because if the people find out, he will be in big trouble,
    Because I married Romeo?
    It might be, but it probably isn’t,
    He is a good, holy person.
    If I was put in a tomb,
    Would I wake up
    before he finds me, that would be scary!
    Won’t I be stifled,
    Because no air comes in,
    And die before he finds me
    Or, if I live,
    I will be surrounded by only darkness,
    In a scary place,–
    Like in a vault,
    Where, for these many hundred years, the bones
    Of my ancestors are:
    Where Tybalt is,
    Lying rotten in his own tomb,
    In the night, there are spirits;–
    Oh no, I will wake up early,
    Early to bad smells,
    And sounds like mandrakes’ torn out of the earth,
    That people that hear them go crazy:–
    O, if I wake, would I not be distraught,
    With all the scary monsters?
    And all my ancestors?
    And with Tybalt?
    And use my ancestor’s bones,
    As a club to smash my brains out?
    I am having hallucinations
    Looking for Romeo, the man who killed Tybalt
    Upon a sword’s point: stay, Tybalt, stay!
    I drink to you, Romeo!
    (She falls upon her bed, within the curtains.)

    In this speech, Juliet practically wants to fake her death. If she can accomplish this, she can live with Romeo happily ever after. Obviously we know she actually dies so does this all go wrong; eventually, probably, but now, very unlikely. In her little speech, she pretty thinks of everything that will go wrong if she wakes up from her so-called death too early. Even with all of the ways this could go wrong, she does it anyway. This is bold and stupid. This shows that Juliet is a dynamic character because she went from shy and quiet to bold.

  12. Original Text:

    “Come, vial.
    What if this mixture do not work at all?
    Shall I be married then to-morrow morning?
    No, no: this shall forbid it: lie thou there.
    Laying down her dagger
    What if it be a poison, which the friar
    Subtly hath minister’d to have me dead,
    Lest in this marriage he should be dishonour’d,
    Because he married me before to Romeo?
    I fear it is: and yet, methinks, it should not,
    For he hath still been tried a holy man.
    How if, when I am laid into the tomb,
    I wake before the time that Romeo
    Come to redeem me? there’s a fearful point!
    Shall I not, then, be stifled in the vault,
    To whose foul mouth no healthsome air breathes in,
    And there die strangled ere my Romeo comes?
    Or, if I live, is it not very like,
    The horrible conceit of death and night,
    Together with the terror of the place,–
    As in a vault, an ancient receptacle,
    Where, for these many hundred years, the bones
    Of all my buried ancestors are packed:
    Where bloody Tybalt, yet but green in earth,
    Lies festering in his shroud; where, as they say,
    At some hours in the night spirits resort;–
    Alack, alack, is it not like that I,
    So early waking, what with loathsome smells,
    And shrieks like mandrakes’ torn out of the earth,
    That living mortals, hearing them, run mad:–
    O, if I wake, shall I not be distraught,
    Environed with all these hideous fears?
    And madly play with my forefather’s joints?
    And pluck the mangled Tybalt from his shroud?
    And, in this rage, with some great kinsman’s bone,
    As with a club, dash out my desperate brains?
    O, look! methinks I see my cousin’s ghost
    Seeking out Romeo, that did spit his body
    Upon a rapier’s point: stay, Tybalt, stay!
    Romeo, I come! this do I drink to thee.”

    When I paraphrased it, it became:

    This vial
    What if this potion doesn’t work
    Will I then be married to Paris tomorrow
    No it will work , I won’t marry him
    (lays down her knife)
    what if it is really poison
    That the Friar has made to kill me
    Would he do it out of guilt
    Because he already married me to Romeo
    I’m scared it is, but I don’t think he would
    because, he is a holy man
    What if, when I’m put in my grave
    I wake too early and Romeo isn’t there yet,
    He hasn’t come yet but people see
    Will the people not kill me in the vault
    Dying in a place without air
    And lie there dead, before Romeo comes
    but if I live, it would feel as though
    my life consist of death and night
    together, but banished
    similar to being stuck in the vault or grave
    where after many years I would lay
    Along with my passed ancestors
    With Tybalt who lay in the earth
    venegane growing in his mind
    When spirits come out at night for revenge
    no, no I will wake up in time
    Early waking with jealous scents
    Of the spirits left in the earth
    Where living people make them angry
    When I wake shall I not be upset
    Overcome by this fear
    Placed with all those rotting bones
    Near the dead Tybalt’s body
    and in my anger near someone’s body
    Like a club will i be hurt
    I may see my cousin’s ghost
    looking for Romeo, the man that killed him
    Please Tybalt stay out of our lives!
    For you Romeo, I drink this potion

    Tonight’s reading we had to read scenes 1,2 and 3 and in those scenes, you see how Juliet drastically. In the beginning of the play, Juliet seemed like a very obedient and carefree kind of girl. She would do as her parents and the nurse told her and wouldn’t even second guess it. Juliet was the kind of girl that made others happy and was pleasant to be around and although they still love her, they are having a hard time understanding why she won’t follow orders and just marry Paris. What they don’t know, is that she fell in love. They say love can make you do crazy things and I think that that saying is very true in Juliet’s case. She ran off with Romeo to get married without her parent’s consent, has snuck around with him, and faking her own death in order to get to be with him. All of these actions and choices she has made recently are not ones she would’ve made before and they were all made because of the fact that she met Romeo. He has made her better and happier, but along with that, they’re relationship has caused chaos and may never be able to be undone.

    • Great job Ryan! I wonder what Juliet’s life would be like without Romeo. Would she have ever fell in lobe with Paris? Would she have still been scared of marrige?

  13. In tonight’s reading of Romeo and Juliet, Juliet goes to the Friar and asks for help with her situation with Paris. The Friar gives her a vial with a drink in it and tells her to drink it the night before she is to be married to Paris. She will then experience death-like symptoms and will not have to marry Paris, and he assures her that Romeo will be there for her when she wakes up. Right before she drinks the vial she second guesses her choices.

    “Come, vial.
    What if this mixture do not work at all?
    Shall I be married then to-morrow morning?
    No, no: this shall forbid it: lie thou there.
    Laying down her dagger
    What if it be a poison, which the friar
    Subtly hath minister’d to have me dead,
    Lest in this marriage he should be dishonour’d,
    Because he married me before to Romeo?
    I fear it is: and yet, methinks, it should not,
    For he hath still been tried a holy man.
    How if, when I am laid into the tomb,
    I wake before the time that Romeo
    Come to redeem me? there’s a fearful point!
    Shall I not, then, be stifled in the vault,
    To whose foul mouth no healthsome air breathes in,
    And there die strangled ere my Romeo comes?
    Or, if I live, is it not very like,
    The horrible conceit of death and night,
    Together with the terror of the place,–
    As in a vault, an ancient receptacle,
    Where, for these many hundred years, the bones
    Of all my buried ancestors are packed:
    Where bloody Tybalt, yet but green in earth,
    Lies festering in his shroud; where, as they say,
    At some hours in the night spirits resort;–
    Alack, alack, is it not like that I,
    So early waking, what with loathsome smells,
    And shrieks like mandrakes’ torn out of the earth,
    That living mortals, hearing them, run mad:–
    O, if I wake, shall I not be distraught,
    Environed with all these hideous fears?
    And madly play with my forefather’s joints?
    And pluck the mangled Tybalt from his shroud?
    And, in this rage, with some great kinsman’s bone,
    As with a club, dash out my desperate brains?
    O, look! methinks I see my cousin’s ghost
    Seeking out Romeo, that did spit his body
    Upon a rapier’s point: stay, Tybalt, stay!
    Romeo, I come! this do I drink to thee.” (ll. 21-60, pages 191-192)

    Once I paraphrased this it became,

    Come, vial.
    What if this drink doesn’t work?
    Then will I be married tomorrow morning?
    No, no: this will prevent that: lie you there.
    (Laying down her dagger)
    What if it is a poison, which the friar
    Subtly gave me to have me dead,
    Because in this marriage he would be dishonored,
    Because he married me and Romeo already?
    I fear it is: and yet, I don’t think so
    For he is still a holy man.
    How if, when I am laid into the tomb,
    I will wake up before Romeo
    Comes to get me? that’s a scary idea!
    Then I won’t be put in the vault,
    To whose foul mouth no healthy air breathes,
    And die painfully in there if Romeo comes too late?
    Or, if I live, which is not likely,
    The horrible idea of death at night,
    Together with the horror of the place,-
    As in a vault, an ancient place,
    Where for hundreds of years, the bones
    Of all my past ancestors are put:
    Where bloody Tybalt, still fresh,
    Lies festering in his shroud, where, as they say,
    At some hours night spirits resort;-
    Ah, ah, it isn’t like that I,
    So early waking, what with loathsome smells,
    And shrieks like when a mandrake is pulled out of the ground,
    That living people, hearing it, go crazy:-
    O, if I wake up, will I not be distraught,
    Filled with all these fears?
    And madly play with my forefather’s joints?
    And take Tybalt out of his shroud?
    And, in this angered state, with some great kingsman bone,
    As it it was a club, beat myself out of desperation?
    O, look! I think I see my cousin’s ghost
    Looking for Romeo, that killed him
    Upon a rapier’s point: stay, Tybalt, stay!
    Romeo, I’m coming! I drink this to you.
    (She falls upon her bed, within the curtains)

    I found Juliet’s fear interesting. All along she has been able to do anything for Romeo’s love, no matter the cost. Now, when she was unsure if the drink was safe, she was all of the sudden timid. You can tell that Juliet really wanted to do all she could for a chance of having Romeo because she kept trying to talk herself out of her fears, saying that Friar is a holy person; he wouldn’t poison her. All throughout the novel we have seen Juliet’s battles- with her love for Romeo, with her parents, with Romeo killing Tybalt- but now we are seeing her have a battle with herself. She is having an internal struggle, she is fearful of the future and losing trust in the Friar and Romeo. She is afraid that Romeo wont get her in time and that the Friar is poisoning her to save his reputation. She is fighting all of these unsureities, leaving her with a battle with herself.

  14. Here is the vial.
    What if it does not work?
    Will I be married tomorrow morning?
    No. This shall forbid it. Lie there.
    (Laying down her dagger)

    What if it is poison, that the friar has
    Made to kill me.
    In my marriage he should be ashamed
    When he had just married me to Romeo?
    I fear he is, and yet, I think it shouldn’t ashamed him,
    For he is still a holy man.
    What if, when I am laid in my coffin,
    I awake before Romeo
    Can take me away? That is a risk!
    Shall I not be contained in a tomb,
    Where I cannot breathe the healthy air,
    And die there from lack of oxygen as Romeo comes?
    Or, if I live, which is not likely,
    I will face the thought of death and the night,
    Combined with the terror of the place,–
    As in a cemetery, a ancient place,
    Where, for hundreds of years, the bones
    Of all my buried ancestors were placed:
    Where Tybalt,
    Lies in his shelter; where, as they say,
    In a spirit resort;–
    Alas, alas, is is not like that to me,
    So young awaking, within loathing smells,
    And shrieks like a mandrake taken out of the earth,
    That the living people that hear them run mad:–
    Oh, if I wake, I will not be panicked,
    Placed within my fears?
    And play with my forefather’s joints?
    And take my cousin Tybalt from his shelter?
    And, in anger, take one of my great relative’s bones,
    And like a club, smash my brains?
    O, look! I think I see my cousin’s ghost
    Looking for Romeo, that spit on his body
    Upon the point of a rapier: stay, Tybalt, stay!
    Romeo, I am coming! I will drink this.

    Juliet has changed drastically over the amount of days. She has turned from a happy girl about to be wed to Paris, until Romeo comes in and steals her love to himself. She falls deeply in love with him and decides to marry him. Then, he kills Tybalt her cousin, and becomes angry at him and upset at herself for falling for him. Despite what she said, it only took a few moments before she started defending Romeo. Then, when she learned that she is soon going to be wed to Paris, she is upset when she was already recently wed to Romeo, and refuses it. Then, her parents disown her, her nurse turns her back on her, and she ends put turning to the friar. The friar gives her a vial that is said to help her be with Romeo. If it didn’t work, she decided she would kill herself with a dagger. Basically, she turned from happy, to deeply in love, to anger, to sorrow, to death. She has a lot going on.

    • I really like the details you used in your paraphrasing! You covered pretty much all of the changes Juliet went through. However, her parents didn’t really disown her, and her nurse does try to comfort Juliet. She just turned to the friar because she figured he could be the one to help her get out of this situation, not because he was the only one who was there for her. But great work on the blog!

  15. “Come, vial.”
    I’ll take the vial.
    “What if this mixture do not work at all?”
    What if the liquid does not work at all?
    “Shall I be married then to-morrow morning?”
    Would I marry Paris tomorrow morning?
    “No, no: this shall forbid it: lie thou there.”
    No, no: this will stop the marriage: I’ll lie it there.
    (Laying down her dagger)

    “What if it be a poison, which the friar
    Subtly hath minister’d to have me dead,”
    What if it’s a poison, that the friar
    crafty had provided to kill me,
    “Lest in this marriage he should be dishonor’d,”
    Then in this marriage he should be ashamed,
    “Because he married me before to Romeo?”
    Because before he married Romeo and I?
    “I fear it is: and yet, methinks, it should not,”
    I’m afraid it’s true, yet, I think, it is not,
    “For he hath still been tried a holy man.”
    For he does try to be a holy man.
    “How if, when I am laid into the tomb,”
    What if, when I am laid into my tomb,
    “I wake before the time that Romeo”
    I wake up before Romeo
    “Come to redeem me? there’s a fearful point!”
    Comes to save me? that’s a fearful thought!
    “Shall I not, then, be stifled in the vault,”
    If I’m not saved, then, I’d be stuck in the tomb,
    “To whose foul mouth no healthsome air breathes in,”
    Where my mouth cannot breathe in healthy air,
    “And there die strangled ere my Romeo comes?”
    And then die there suffocated before Romeo comes?
    “Or, if I live, is it not very like,”
    Or, if I live, it is not very likely that
    “The horrible conceit of death and night,”
    The horrible thoughts of death and night,
    “Together with the terror of the place,–”
    Mixed with the terror of the tomb,-
    “As in a vault, an ancient receptacle,”
    As being in a tomb, an old place,
    “Where, for these many hundred years, the bones”
    Where, for all these centuries, the bones
    “Of all my buried ancestors are packed:”
    Of all my dead ancestors are kept:
    “Where bloody Tybalt, yet but green in earth,”
    Where dead Tybalt, yet freshly buried in the tomb,
    “Lies festering in his shroud; where, as they say,”
    He lies rotting in his grave; where, as they say,
    “At some hours in the night spirits resort;–”
    At certain hours in the night the spirits live;-
    “Alack, alack, is it not like that I,”
    Oh no, oh no, it is not like I,
    “So early waking, what with loathsome smells,”
    Waking up early, with hateful smells,
    “And shrieks like mandrakes’ torn out of the earth,”
    And screams like flowers torn out of the earth,
    “That living mortals, hearing them, run mad:–”
    That living people, upon hearing them, run away:-
    “O, if I wake, shall I not be distraught,”
    Oh, if I wake, I would I be distraught,
    “Environed with all these hideous fears?”
    surrounded by all these ugly fears?
    “And madly play with my forefather’s joints?”
    And madly play with my ancestor’s bones?
    “And pluck the mangled Tybalt from his shroud?”
    And take the ruined Tybalt from his grave?
    “And, in this rage, with some great kinsman’s bone,”
    And, in this madness, with a great grandfather’s bone,
    “As with a club, dash out my desperate brains?”
    As with a club, bash out my own brain?
    “O, look! methinks I see my cousin’s ghost”
    Oh, look! I think I see Tybalt’s ghost
    “Seeking out Romeo, that did spit his body”
    Looking for Romeo, who stabbed his body
    “Upon a rapier’s point: stay, Tybalt, stay!”
    Upon a sword”s tip: wait, Tybalt, wait!
    “Romeo, I come! this do I drink to thee.”
    Romeo, I am coming! this mixture I will drink to you.
    (She falls upon her bed, within the curtains.)

    Juliet has come a long way not only as a character, but as a human throughout the play. In the first act, Juliet aimed to please her parents. We learn that she is to marry Paris and although she is reluctant to do so, she will only marry someone if her family approves of that person. Later on when she meets Romeo, she disobeys her parents by associating herself with a Montague, and she keeps her romance with Romeo a secret. She only talk about this to her nurse. After she marries Romeo and he kills Tybalt, she is very distraught. The one she loves most has been banished. With Romeo out of the picture, the Capulets coincidentally have arranged the date for Juliet to marry Paris. Juliet cannot continue to pretend anymore. She cries, and tells her parents that she does not want to marry him. All of the secrets, and pain her romance with Romeo has caused her, just built up and she couldn’t take orders any longer. This is so relevant today. Women have been facing a lot for decades, and recently women have been able to speak out and be strong. Juliet will not allow her parents to choose someone for her to marry, because Juliet has already found true love with Romeo. Therefore, she uses her wit to create a plan that will allow her to leave her family, and be with someone she truly loves.

  16. Romeo and Juliet “Come, vial” speech:

    Come, vial.
    What if this mixture do not work at all?
    Shall I be married then tomorrow morning?
    No, this shall forbid it. Lie thou there.
    What if it be a poison which the Friar
    Subtly hath ministered to have me dead, Lest in this marriage he should be dishonored
    Because he married me before to Romeo?
    I fear it is. And yet methinks it should not,
    For he hath still been tried a holy man.
    How if, when I am laid into the tomb,
    I wake before the time that Romeo
    Come to redeem me? There’s a fearful point.
    Shall I not then be stifled in the vault,
    To whose foul mouth no hearthstone air breathes in,
    And there die strangled ere my Romeo comes?
    Or, if I live, is it not very like,
    The horrible conceit of death and night,
    Together with the terror of the place—
    As in a vault, an ancient receptacle
    Where, for these many hundred years, the bones
    Of all my buried ancestors are packed:
    Where bloody Tybalt, yet but green in earth,
    Lies festering in his shroud; where, as they say,
    At some hours in the night spirits resort;–
    Alack, alack, is it not like that I,
    So early waking, what with loathsome smells,
    And shrieks like mandrakes’ torn out of the earth,
    That living mortals, hearing them, run mad:–
    O, if I wake, shall I not be distraught,
    Environed with all these hideous fears?
    And madly play with my forefather’s joints?
    And pluck the mangled Tybalt from his shroud?
    And, in this rage, with some great kinsman’s bone,
    As with a club, dash out my desperate brains?
    O, look! methinks I see my cousin’s ghost
    Seeking out Romeo, that did spit his body
    Upon a rapier’s point: stay, Tybalt, stay!
    Romeo, I come! this do I drink to thee.

    Paraphrased:

    Come vial,
    What if this mixture doesn’t work?
    Will I end up married tomorrow morning?
    No, this will work
    (Puts down dagger)
    No, it shall be prevented.
    What if the Friar gave me a poison
    Made in order for me to die
    Is not proud of my marriage
    Because he married me to Romeo?
    I fear so, yet I doubt it,
    For he is still a holy man.
    What if when I am put into the tomb
    I wake before the time Romeo has come to get me? That’s a big fear of mine.
    Shall I not be stuck in there
    In a place where no fresh air reaches
    And suffocate, waiting for Romeo
    Or, if I live, which is not very likely,
    The horrible feeling of death and dark
    Together with the terror of the area
    As in a tomb,
    Where for this many hundred years
    The bones of my ancestors lie
    Where bloody Tybalt
    Lies in this crowd, as they say
    Sometimes in the night spirits walk around
    No, no, it is not like me
    So early waking with awful smells
    And sounds like mandrakes torn from earth
    That humans go crazy hearing them
    If I wake I shall not be horrified
    Accustomed to all these fear
    I’ll start playing with my forefather’s bones
    And find Tybalt’s body in the cluster
    I’m in anger with some bones
    And use it to knock out my brains
    Oh, look! I think I see a cousin’s ghost
    Looking for Romeo that killed him
    Upon a swords point! Stay Tybalt, stay!
    Romeo, Romeo, Romeo! Here’s a drink, I drink to thee!

    Wow. Talk about a lot to work with. I’ve decided to focus on some motifs that come up big time in this speech that we should note as a class. For starters, we have more light and dark. Specifically here, Juliet is talking about the dark of this described graveyard that has all the bones of her family’s heritage. She describes it as bringing an aura of death and darkness, and also that souls roam the area. Darkness comes up again and again in this book, and we know it represents the death. However, could her family now represent darkness as it does in this scene? Perhaps Shakespeare is showing us that Juliet will now experience he family being cold towards her and how she must hide herself in the dark and that she can’t show herself. Also, I believe precedents play a big role in this play. Nearly all of the customs in the families are from early heritage in the family. This shows how neither sides are open to try new things, making Romeo and Juliet’s relationship even more heated.

  17. Come, vial.
    What if this mixture do not work at all?
    Shall I be married then to-morrow morning?
    No, no: this shall forbid it: lie thou there.
    (Laying down her dagger)

    What if it be a poison, which the friar
    Subtly hath minister’d to have me dead,
    Lest in this marriage he should be dishonour’d,
    Because he married me before to Romeo?
    I fear it is: and yet, methinks, it should not,
    For he hath still been tried a holy man.
    How if, when I am laid into the tomb,
    I wake before the time that Romeo
    Come to redeem me? there’s a fearful point!
    Shall I not, then, be stifled in the vault,
    To whose foul mouth no healthsome air breathes in,
    And there die strangled ere my Romeo comes?
    Or, if I live, is it not very like,
    The horrible conceit of death and night,
    Together with the terror of the place,–
    As in a vault, an ancient receptacle,
    Where, for these many hundred years, the bones
    Of all my buried ancestors are packed:
    Where bloody Tybalt, yet but green in earth,
    Lies festering in his shroud; where, as they say,
    At some hours in the night spirits resort;–
    Alack, alack, is it not like that I,
    So early waking, what with loathsome smells,
    And shrieks like mandrakes’ torn out of the earth,
    That living mortals, hearing them, run mad:–
    O, if I wake, shall I not be distraught,
    Environed with all these hideous fears?
    And madly play with my forefather’s joints?
    And pluck the mangled Tybalt from his shroud?
    And, in this rage, with some great kinsman’s bone,
    As with a club, dash out my desperate brains?
    O, look! methinks I see my cousin’s ghost
    Seeking out Romeo, that did spit his body
    Upon a rapier’s point: stay, Tybalt, stay!
    Romeo, I come! this do I drink to thee.
    (She falls upon her bed, within the curtains.)

    Paraphrased:
    Come vial,
    What if this mixture does not work
    Then would I be married tomorrow morning
    No, no this will prevent that lie this there
    What if it is a poison that the friar made to kill me
    Since he would be dishonored
    Because he married me to Romeo
    I fear it is yet I don’t think that it is true
    Since he is a holy man
    What if I lay in this tomb
    And I wake up before Romeo comes to get me
    That would be a scary moment
    What if I suffocate in the tomb
    Since there is no clean air in it
    I would then die before Romeo comes
    Or if I do live which is not likely
    The horrible feeling of death and darkness
    Would come together to bring terror
    In this old vault
    Where for hundreds of years the bones of my ancestor lies
    Where Tybalt who just dies
    Lies with his shroud where as people say
    Spirits come out during the night
    No no it is not like that
    When I wake up early there would be bad smells
    And loud screeching screams
    When a human hears it they would run mad
    If I wake up won’t I be confused and scared
    Surrounded by my fears
    Soon crazily playing with my ancestors bones
    And take out Tybalt from his tomb
    And in rage with a kinsmans bone
    Use as a weapon to blow my brains out
    Oh look. I think I see my cousin’s ghost
    Looking for Romeo that killed him
    Upon your swords point. Stay Tybalt stay
    I drink this potion for my love Romeo
    Clearly Juliet has evolved throughout this whole play and considering the time frame of this play I’d say her character evolved quickly. At first we saw her as someone who is impulsive and wanted to marry a man she just met. Now she may still be impulsive but she is definitely wiser. Instead of just doing things she thinks of both bad and good things that may come out of it.

  18. “Come vial
    What if the concoction fails me?
    Will I married to Paris in the morning?
    No,no: this will prevent it: lie this there
    What if it’s really poison, which the friar
    Has stealthily used to have me dead,
    For this marriage he’d be shamed,
    Because he wed me and Romeo?
    I fear this but I don’t believe it.
    He has always tried to be a holy man.
    When I fake my death,
    I wake before the time Romeo,
    has come to me? that is a very terrifying possibility.
    If I not, lay in the vault
    The foul mouth who cannot gain no morals
    An I die before my Romeo comes?
    Or, If I live, it’s not likely
    The horrible idea of perishing and the night
    With the horryfying idea of that place,
    in the vault,
    Where for a century, the skeletons
    All my relatives are laid,
    Where Tybalt is laid in the Earth.
    Lies in the shroud,
    At the late hours of the night,
    Alas, alas its not that I
    So in the early morn, with foulsome smells,
    And it’s ripped from the Earth,
    Living people, are turned mad by death,
    If I wake will I be saddened,
    Poisoned by my fears?
    And madly meddle with the ancestors joints
    And snatch Tybalt from his tomb,
    And in anger, with your relatives skeletons,
    With a club, beat me to death,
    Look! I see my cousins ghost
    I seek romeo, how they treated him,
    upon that point, stay, Tybalt, stay!
    Romeo, I’m coming! I drink this for you!”
    Juliet’s is becoming quite helpless. She’s desperate in love. She would do anything for Romeo. She’s being very selfish with her solution to her Romeo problem. She knows she going to hurt everyone who cares about her, but Romeo is more important to her. Despite this shes going through with it. Yet, she is terrified. She is scared shes being manipulated, she’s terrified she will really die. Yet, she risks it all for her love.

  19. My paraphrasing:
    Here, vial
    What if this mixture doesn’t work at all?
    Will I be married tomorrow morning then?
    No, this will stop it. Lie there.
    What if it’s a poison that the Friar secretly had slipped in to kill me,
    If he is dishonored in this marriage
    Because he married Romoeo and I before?
    I’m scared that it is. And yet I think it is not,
    For he was still trying to be a holy man.
    What if, when I am laid in my coffin,
    I wake up before Romeo comes to find me?
    That’s a scary point
    If I am not chocked in the vault,
    To whose disgusting mouth no healthy air breaths in,
    And there I die chocked when my Romeo comes?.
    Or, if I live,bit is not very like
    The horrible thoughts of death and darkness,
    Together with the terror of the vault,
    A vault, an ancient container,
    Where for many hundreds of years the bones
    Of all my ancestors are packed;
    Where bloody Tybalt, still fresh in the Earth
    Lies festering in his shroud;
    Where, as they say,
    At some hours in the night spirits leave,
    Alas, alas, is it not like I,
    Wake up so early, with the disgusting smells,
    And screams like mandrakes pulled out of the ground,
    That living people, hearing them, run away
    Oh, if I wake, will I not be distraught,
    Filled with all these horrible fears,
    And crazily play with my ancestors joints,
    And take the mangled Tybalt from his shroud,
    And, In this madness, with some great grandfather’s bones, bash my desperate brains out?
    O look, I think I see my cousin’s ghost
    Looking for Romeo that impaled his body upon a sword’s point!
    Stay Tybalt, stay!
    Romeo, Romeo, Romeo, Here is the drink. I drink for you.

    In thes lines it shows a significant and Serious change in Juliet’s demeanor. Juliet is willing to take her own death, or actually die for Romeo. She loves Romeo dearly, and even though she only knew him for a short time, she is hisnwife, and according to tradition, she must stay faithful and love him. And she does love him, it is now something her parents can’t change, she is willing to die if it meant being with Romeo, and Romeo is willing to reciprocate that. This shows how Juliet has become seriously changed by Romeo’s actions, and her families actions definitely influenced her. The nurse pushed her over the edge, her father forced her to marry someone she didn’t love, even if it was tradition, and her mother didn’t have a mind of her own. My question is, would it have been different if Juliet was we’d to Paris? What would have happened?

  20. Come, vial.What if thispotion doesn’t do anything? Will I still marry Tomorrow morning? No, no: This will stop that from happening, I must do this.
    (Laying down her dagger)
    What if this is poisonous, And the Friar did this in secret to have me die, Maybe because he is dishonoured, Because he married me and Romeo? I am afraid: and yet, I thinks, it shouldn’t, Because he is a kind man of God, a holy man. What if, when I am Buried,I wake up before Romeo can get to me?That is a nightmare! That is why I will not be buried right now. Or, if I live, which isn’t likely, I will have a terrible time. Where, for I will see hundreds of years of dead ancestors with there bones packed in. I will see Dead Tybalt, in the green earth, becoming infected;They always say spirits of the night resort to this;Oh that isn’t like me,waking up early, with gross smells, And screams like flowers being pulled out of the earth, That people, hearing them, run in chaos:–O, if I wake,I hope I won’t be distraught,enclosed with all these nightmares?And become crazy playing with bones of my ancestors? Meet the disgusting Tybalt in his grave?And, in this madness with some great boy’s joint,As with a hammer,bang on my sickly head? O, look! I think I see Tybalt’s ghost looking for Romeo, stabbed him with a sword: stay, Tybalt, stay! Romeo, I come! I will drink this.
    I think Juliet is very desperate and indecisive. Ms. Quinson told us that Romeo’s weakness was his youthful quick ways. Romeo and Juliet don’t want to wait, they what everything to happen right now, and they don’t understand how the future works and all. Juliet just sees all the troubles in her way, and she doesn’t see all the good things that could come in the future. She is so lost and in a bad situation, but she shouldn’t want to kill herself at all. She needs help, but the only one who will support her is Romeo, who is banished. I want Juliet to get help, maybe from the nurse or someone else, because she is at a very low point.

  21. Come bottle,
    What if this medicine doesn’t work?
    Will I then marry tomorrow?
    No, no, this will prevent that. You lie here.
    What if this is a poison the friar
    Has secretly brewed to kill me
    In order to prevent him dishonor through this marriage
    Because he has married me previously to Romeo?
    I think it is, but I think it shouldn’t
    He has been proven to be a holy man.
    If I am laid on my grave, then how
    If I wake up before Romeo
    comes to forgive me? Now that’s a scary thought
    Therefore, will I not be stuffed in a tomb
    Whose vile mouth breathes no healthy air,
    And die strangled before Romeo comes?
    Or if I live, which isn’t very likely,
    The horrible thought of death and night
    In combination with the creepiness of the place

    Like in a vault, an old container
    Where for many centuries the bones
    of my ancestors pile up
    Where bloody Tybalt is still green in the ground.
    Where he festers in his darkness
    In some hours of the night spirits return
    Oh oh, it is not like I
    Waking up to awful smells
    And shrieks like mandrakes
    As living people are driven and
    I hit I wake up I will not be displeased
    Surrounded with all these ugly fears
    And madly toy with my grandfather’s joints
    And grab the mangled Tybalt from the ground
    And grab some great relative’s bone
    Like a club to smash my brains out?
    Oh look I think I see my cousin
    Looking for Romeo, who skewered him
    On the end of a rapier, stay Tybalt stay!
    I’m coming, Romeo, and to this I drink for you!

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