Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?

This weekend, please read Act III, scene ii, and then analyze Juliet’s transformation in the section of the text I have copied below.  Explain how Juliet changes over the course of this section of the text, provide specific textual evidence of that transformation, and — here’s the tricky part!– make sure you show how that text really demonstrates the change.

As always, please follow the rules of standard written English and respond to at least one other comment in this thread.

JULIET
O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!
Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?
Beautiful tyrant! fiend angelical!
Dove-feather’d raven! wolvish-ravening lamb!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st,
A damned saint, an honourable villain!
O nature, what hadst thou to do in hell,
When thou didst bower the spirit of a fiend
In moral paradise of such sweet flesh?
Was ever book containing such vile matter
So fairly bound? O that deceit should dwell
In such a gorgeous palace!

Nurse
There’s no trust,
No faith, no honesty in men; all perjured,
All forsworn, all naught, all dissemblers.
Ah, where’s my man? give me some aqua vitae:
These griefs, these woes, these sorrows make me old.
Shame come to Romeo!

JULIET
Blister’d be thy tongue
For such a wish! he was not born to shame:
Upon his brow shame is ashamed to sit;
For ’tis a throne where honour may be crown’d
Sole monarch of the universal earth.
O, what a beast was I to chide at him!

Nurse
Will you speak well of him that kill’d your cousin?

JULIET
Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?
Ah, poor my lord, what tongue shall smooth thy name,
When I, thy three-hours wife, have mangled it?
But, wherefore, villain, didst thou kill my cousin?
That villain cousin would have kill’d my husband:
Back, foolish tears, back to your native spring;
Your tributary drops belong to woe,
Which you, mistaking, offer up to joy.
My husband lives, that Tybalt would have slain;
And Tybalt’s dead, that would have slain my husband:
All this is comfort; wherefore weep I then?
Some word there was, worser than Tybalt’s death,
That murder’d me: I would forget it fain;
But, O, it presses to my memory,
Like damned guilty deeds to sinners’ minds:
‘Tybalt is dead, and Romeo–banished;’
That ‘banished,’ that one word ‘banished,’
Hath slain ten thousand Tybalts. Tybalt’s death
Was woe enough, if it had ended there:
Or, if sour woe delights in fellowship
And needly will be rank’d with other griefs,
Why follow’d not, when she said ‘Tybalt’s dead,’
Thy father, or thy mother, nay, or both,
Which modern lamentations might have moved?
But with a rear-ward following Tybalt’s death,
‘Romeo is banished,’ to speak that word,
Is father, mother, Tybalt, Romeo, Juliet,
All slain, all dead. ‘Romeo is banished!’
There is no end, no limit, measure, bound,
In that word’s death; no words can that woe sound.

R&J blog #12

36 thoughts on “Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?

  1. In act III scene ii, we see Juliet and the nurse discussing the events that happened in scene i. Tybalt accidently stabbed Mercutio while they were fooling around, and then Romeo killed Tybalt out of spite and guilt. Juliet and the nurse don’t seem to know the exact events that happened, all they know is that Tybalt is dead, and Romeo was his killer. This is a very tough situation for Juliet. The love of her life has just killed her family member! Worst of all, Juliet is already risking everything to be with Romeo. Now that he killed Tybalt, the Capulets are going to hate him and the Montagues even more than before. On a side note, in the Zeffirelli movie version, Tybalt and Mercutio were both stabbed in the area of the heart. This might be a symbol of how any love or truce that could have been approaching has now been ripped away, which is not good. A lot of thoughts must be running through Juliet’s head, and it seems like she really changed throughout the text. Juliet started off saying a little monologue describing Romeo as a bad person, yet also an innocent pure person. “Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave? Beautiful tyrant! fiend angelical! Dove-feather’d raven! wolvish-ravening lamb!” The nurse responds with saying that no men can be trusted and this event proves it. However, Juliet is upset by this remark, “Blistered be thy tongue For such a wish! he was not born to shame…O, what a beast was I to chide at him!” I think that Juliet responded to her cousins death with despair and anger, but then she realized that she loves Romeo and he must have killed Tybalt for a reason. This is really confusing because she changed so suddenly. However, her next line says it all: “My husband lives, that Tybalt would have slain; And Tybalt’s dead, that would have slain my husband: All this is comfort; wherefore weep I then?” Juliet knows how much they hate each other. She is smart, she knows that they would have killed each other eventually, and she is happy is is Romeo who lives. This scene really shows just how much she cares for him, and loves him no matter what.

    • Great Job, Patsy! You did a great job summarizing the scene, and describing Juliet’s change. Keep up the great work!

    • You did a very good job analyzing Juliet’s perspective on the murder of Tybalt. Also, I really liked your bit on the fact that Tybalt and Mercutio were both stabbed in the heart and how it can be symbolized as Romeo and Juliet’s chance at making their love public to be ripped away. Good job Patsy!

      • I agree with Anjali. The heart is very important with love, and as weird as this may sound, the blood draining from their hearts may be the love draining from relationships. For example, Romeo was just expressing how much he loved Tybalt. Now, Mercutio’s blood drains from his heart, just as Romeo’s love for Tybalt drains away.

  2. In this scene, we finally see Juliet’s perspective of all this action. We see Juliet and the Nurse talk about what had happened: Romeo kills Tybalt. They are both very shocked, Juliet goes into a rage of anger, and regrets. “‘O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!'”. Juliet is in love with Romeo, but she never thought that he could be this evil. Juliet doesn’t know that Romeo killed Tybalt out of revenge, immediately reacts this way. She is saying that a monster is within a beautiful flower, “‘Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st'” and is not the person Juliet expected him to be. It was right for Juliet to react this way. When you lose a person that is very meaningful to you, especially a family member, you don’t see the full picture. She is angry because Tybalt is dead, and that is the reaction that I would have guessed. Even though Romeo is her husband, you immediately take the side of the person that died. In that one moment, she doesn’t care if Romeo was revenging Mercutio’s death, she just “sees” that Tybalt is dead. In response the Nurse tells her that all men lie, and that all men are not the way they seem. “‘No faith, no honesty in men. All perjured,/All forsworn, all naught, all dissemblers…/Shame come to Romeo!'” However, Juliet does not agree, and suddenly, she takes the side of Romeo. She says,

    Blistered be thy tongue
    For such a wish! He was not born to shame.
    Upon his brow shame is ashamed to sit,
    For ’tis a throne where honor may be crowned.
    Sole monarch of the universal earth,
    Oh, what a beast was I to chide at him!

    Juliet says that Romeo is not meant for shame, and that he does not deserve to be called shameful. She tells the Nurse that he is a honorable man, and immediately regrets saying bad things about him. This is a very quick change for Juliet. One second she hates him, the net second, she is defending him. Furthermore, when the Nurse asks her why she is saying good things about the person who killed her cousin, Juliet responded saying that she could never say bad things about her husband, which she married just only three hours ago. Juliet then begins to wonder why Romeo had killed. She assumes that Tybalt attempted to kill Romeo, and that Romeo was just defending himself. She is happy Romeo is alive, and will grief for Tybalt’s death.
    Now that Romeo is banished, how will Romeo and Juliet’s relationship continue? Since Romeo killed Tybalt, will the relationship between the families become worse?

    • Whoops! Just reading this over and realizing that I have a lot of grammatical errors! Sorry! Please ignore!

    • Great response Ellie! I like how you added how Juliet really regretted saying bad things about Romeo. Nice work!

  3. Juliet and the Nurse find out what had happened in this scene, and their reactions are very emotional and full of grief. But, the Nurse is sad for Tybalt, while Juliet is sad for her situation, and for both Tybalt and Romeo. As we know, Romeo had been banished from the town of Verona for what he had done, which actually seemed like a pretty light punishment, as the Capulets wanted Romeo to be killed. The Nurse, a few hours after talking and allowing Romeo to marry Juliet, now hates and despises him. She calls him a horrible person, and shames him. At first, Juliet does the same thing, and criticizes Romeo for his actions. But, she then remembers that she is in love with Romeo, changes her opinions and tries to forgive him and come up with a reason to why Romeo is still a good person. She states that Romeo would not kill for fun, and there had to be a good reason behind his act. But, this does not change the fact that Juliet had lost two people who she was close to, in her cousin Tybalt, and her husband Romeo. Juliet is stuck in a very precarious and hard situation, and she will have to decide if she will back up her family or her lover.

  4. In Act III, Scene i of Romeo and Juliet, by William Shakespeare, Juliet is informed about the atrocities that had just occurred regarding Tybalt and Romeo. Tybalt had stabbed and killed Mercutio in the town square. In absolute anger and fury, Romeo approached Tybalt and confronted him for his actions against Romeo’s friend Mercutio, which led to the death of Tybalt. This is a very interesting situation regarding relationships, because Romeo, who is the love of Juliet’s life (and vice versa), had just killed Juliet’s cousin, Tybalt. Also, this seems like it will make the feud between Montagues and Capulets even worse, which is all but good for Romeo and Juliet. First and foremost, Juliet waits impatiently for night to come so that she can celebrate her wedding night with Romeo. Next, the Nurse arrives and in her grief and sorrow, initially mislead Juliet into thinking that Romeo has been killed. When the Nurse eventually reveals that it is Tybalt who is dead, Juliet feels a little better because it’s not Romeo that died. After hearing that Romeo has been banished, Juliet is overwhelmed by grief and is feeling melancholy. After that, the Nurse told Juliet that Romeo is hiding at Friar Laurence’s cell, and Juliet sends the Nurse with a ring for Romeo. Juliet changed a lot throughout the text, as she was talking to the nurse. Juliet started off by suggesting that Romeo is evil and had bad intentions, but her love for him made him innocent and good at the same time, “O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!” The nurse told her that men cannot be trusted and that this event is just an example of why that is so. Juliet clearly doesn’t agree, saying:

    “Blistered be thy tongue
    For such a wish! He was not born to shame.
    Upon his brow shame is ashamed to sit,
    For ’tis a throne where honor may be crowned.
    Sole monarch of the universal earth,
    Oh, what a beast was I to chide at him!”

    Juliet immediately thought along the lines of family first, meaning she felt despair and grief towards her cousin’s death. Her first response was anger towards the person who is responsible for her cousin’s death which was Romeo. While communicating with the nurse about the situation, she realized that she loves Romeo way too much to hate or dislike him, and there must have been a reason for him to kill Tybalt. She believes that she must stick with her husband and there definitely was a good reason behind Romeo’s actions. I wonder what will happen to Romeo, and how he and Juliet will talk to and treat each other now. What is the ring all about? I hope to read more and learn more about Romeo, Juliet, and their everlasting love story.

  5. In Act III, scene ii of Romeo and Juliet, we witness a change in Juliet as she goes from wishing bad on Romeo to countering that by saying the opposite. When talking of Romeo, she says, “O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!/ Did ever a dragon keep so fair a cave?” (ll. 79-80, page 135). She goes on with many more analogies, comparing him to a dove feathered raven and a beautiful tyrant. Here Juliet, is conveying her current position on Romeo. Juliet is so full of rage and frustration towards him, and she hates what he does. She still loves him, however it is kind of bittersweet. He is both good and bad. After the nurse agrees with her and says there is no honesty in men, Juliet turns on a dime and exerts her rage on the Nurse. She is shouting at the nurse, stating, “Blister’d be thy tongue/ For such a wish!…Will you speak well of him that killed thy cousin?/ Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?” (ll. 99-100 and 105-106, page 136 and 137). Whereas before she was only angry at Romeo, now she is caught in a grind. Who should she be loyal to, her slain cousin, or exiled husband? Ultimately her husband wins out, however, she is still very angry at the fact that he killed Tybalt. She then goes on to say how Romeo being exiled is worse in feeling than the death of ten thousand Tybalts. To me, this seems a little much, even for Shakespeare and both Romeo and Juliet. These two young lovers have just met, yet one being forced away is worse than the death of Juliet’s cousin she has known her whole life? And to top it off, her lover was the murderer. To me, it seems as if Shakespeare is really pushing the romantic aspect between the two. But why does he make her turn and love Romeo again? I really think he did it just to show that Juliet is confused. A serious event has just happened, and now she is unsure where her allegiance lies. It really gives insight and depth into her character and shows she is human, and also has flaws. Shakespeare also goes about making her think Romeo did nothing wrong in an interesting way, making her turn right around on the nurse. Shakespeare does this through the nurse, who basically goes right along with Juliet’s commentary and feeds into it, stating all men are liars are bad. But that’s not what Juliet was saying. She is expressing her anguish at Romeo, not categorizing all men. I think this is behind her getting angry at the nurse, and then she turns back to the topic of not being mad at Romeo. To be honest, I found this scene very interesting as it gave more insight into Juliet and helped to humanize her.

    • Great blog! I think you made a good point stating that Juliet was caught in a very tough situation; Romeo or her family. It does show how Juliet is confused, and therefore human. She and Romeo are still very young, and she is expected to make very important and serious choices. Keep up the good work. 🙂

  6. When the Nurse comes back and tells Juliet the news, that Tybalt is dead and that it’s Romeo’s fault. At first, Juliet is shock strucken by the fact that Tybalt, her cousin is dead and that it is Romeo who killed him. Because of this, she begins to get upset over the loss of her family member and wants to grieve for him. The Nurse grieves along with her and they hold each other the Nurse then says “Shame come to Romeo” and Juliet’s mood changes quickly. This makes Juliet upset because she doesn’t want anyone criticising her love and her husband so she gets defensive. She wants to protect him and make sure that he isn’t going to be killed for the crime he committed she wants him to stay safe because she loves him with all her heart. She is hurt when the Nurse says that because the Nurse was on their side and now seems not to be. she wants the nurses approval because she doesn’t have many people in her life that can know about her and Romeo’s relationship. She is torn because she wants to mourn for the loss of her cousin but she also wants to know for sure that her love will be safe. The nurse is mad because she doesn’t think that it’s ok that Romeo killed him, she also may feel guilty for going behind the families backs and getting the two married. She asks Juliet if she will still love him and speak good of him because the Nurse isn’t sure if she would after something like this. Juliet says that she could never speak ill of him because he is her husband she has to love him and she will. I think that Juliet doesn’t know how to go on at this point in the scene because she doesn’t really know what happened. All she knows is that her husband killed her cousin, and no one in her family is going to be okay with that. In the same way that the nurse doesn’t seem too okay with it.

    • Great job, Ryan. I agree that Juliet doesn’t really know what to think since she doesn’t have that much information on what happened. Keep up the good work.

  7. In scene ii of Act III in Romeo and Juliet, Juliet goes through a series of changes throughout being told by the Nurse that Romeo killed Tybalt and was banished. At first, as the first wave of knowledge hits her, Juliet verbally bashes Romeo. She calls him many terrible things, but still keeps a bit of admiration with her insults. For instance, she says, “Beautiful tyrant! fiend angelical! / Dove-feather’d raven! wolvish-ravening lamb! / Despised substance of divinest show!” Although Juliet calls him a tyrant, she describes the tyrant beautiful. She also calls him a fiend, but an angelical one at that. As time goes on, she changes her view of things. As the Nurse cries that shame should come to Romeo, Juliet says, “Blister’d be thy tongue / For such a wish! he was not born to shame… O, what a beast was I to chide at him!” Now, she scolds her for criticizing her lover, and regrets chiding him. Furthermore, she starts to see how foolish she was for thinking such ill things of Romeo. The Nurse says, “Will you speak well of him that kill’d your cousin?” to which Juliet replies, “Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?…My husband lives, that Tybalt would have slain; And Tybalt’s dead, that would have slain my husband: All this is comfort; wherefore weep I then?” Juliet finally realizes that if she should not be angry, but grateful that it was Tybalt and not her husband that was slain. If she wished Tybalt alive, then Romeo would be dead. As a result, she questions why she weeps for such a loss.

    • I enjoyed reading your blog. I agree with everything you said and like the quotations used. Overall, you had a nice blog and I enjoyed reading it,

  8. In Act III scene ii of Romeo and Juliet, the nurse reveals to Juliet that Tybalt has been killed by Romeo. At first, Juliet gets very upset, and regrets marrying or falling in love with Romeo. She says that his appearance and behavior around her was very innocent and loving, but since he killed Tybalt, on the inside he must be cruel. “Beautiful tyrant, fiend angelical!/ Dove-feathered raven, wolvish-ravening lamb!/ Despiséd substance of divinest show!/ Just opposite to what thoue justly seem’st,/ A damnéd saint, an honorable villain.”(page 135, lines 81-85) Juliet is saying that Romeo appeared to be good but showed his true evil side when killing Tybalt. But after the nurse said that shame should come to Romeo, Juliet has a sudden change of heart. “Back, foolish tears, back to your native spring;/ Your tributary droops belong to woe,/ Which you, mistaking, offer up to joy./ My husband live, that Tybalt would have slain,/ And Tybalt’s dead, that would have slain my/ husband./ All this is comfort. Wherefore I weep then?”(page 137, lines 112-118) Here, Juliet is expressing how relieved and happy she is that Romeo is alright. She doesn’t want Tybalt dead, but if having him die meant that Romeo would live, Juliet would have happily agreed. She says that she is crying only because her tears let loose during happy times, and this was a happy time now. Her feeling changed very suddenly. They went from hating Romeo to protecting him from the nurse’s scorn. Although Romeo did a very bad thing, Juliet still wishes to protect him from any judgmental things that are being said against him. Juliet loves Romeo no matter what he does.

    • Great job! You showed a great understanding of the text and I think that Juliet wants to stick up for her husband but she is forgetting to look at the whole story and think about her cousin, who was always next to her.

  9. In tonights reading of Act 3 Scene ii of Romeo and Juliet, by William Shakespeare, Juliet is informed about what Romeo did to Tybalt and she doesn’t know how to react. Juliet tells the nurse: “O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face! Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave? Beautiful tyrant! fiend angelical!
    Dove-feather’d raven! wolvish-ravening lamb! Despised substance of divinest show! Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st, A damned saint, an honourable villain! O nature, what hadst thou to do in hell, When thou didst bower the spirit of a fiend In moral paradise of such sweet flesh? Was ever book containing such vile matter So fairly bound? O that deceit should dwell In such a gorgeous palace!” In other words, Juliet is saying, oh he is a snake hidden behind a flower! Did a dragon ever hide in such a beautiful cage? A beautiful but cruel person! Evil plant! He’s a raven with the beautiful feathers of the dove. He’s a lamb who hunts like a wolf. I hate yet he is the best man. He turned out to be the exact opposite of what he seemed to be. He’s a villain who seems honorable. Why did you put the soul of a criminal in the perfect body of a man? Was there ever such an evil book with such a beautiful cover? Oh, I can’t believe the deepest evil lurked inside something so beautiful! In this speech, Juliet changers her mind because she doesn’t know whose side to be on. On one side there is her husband, Romeo and on the other there is Tybalt, her cousins. I can’t imagine being in her place because she is lost and she doesn’t have someone who understands the situation she is in. She is explaining in this speech that Romeo had tricked her. Then she says, “Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband? Ah, poor my lord, what tongue shall smooth thy name, When I, thy three-hours wife, have mangled it? But, wherefore, villain, didst thou kill my cousin? That villain cousin would have killed my husband: Back, foolish tears, back to your native spring; Your tributary drops belong to woe, Which you, mistaking, offer up to joy. My husband lives, that Tybalt would have slain; And Tybalt’s dead, that would have slain my husband: All this is comfort; wherefore weep I then? Some word there was, worser than Tybalt’s death, That murder’d me: I would forget it fain;
    But, O, it presses to my memory, Like damned guilty deeds to sinners’ minds: ‘Tybalt is dead, and Romeo–banished;’ That ‘banished,’ that one word ‘banished,’ Hath slain ten thousand Tybalts. Tybalt’s death Was woe enough, if it had ended there: Or, if sour woe delights in fellowship And needle will be rank’d with other griefs, Why follow’d not, when she said ‘Tybalt’s dead,’ Thy father, or thy mother, nay, or both, Which modern lamentations might have moved? But with a rearward following Tybalt’s death,
    ‘Romeo is banished,’ to speak that word, Is father, mother, Tybalt, Romeo, Juliet, All slain, all dead. ‘Romeo is banished!’ There is no end, no limit, measure, bound, In that word’s death; no words can that woe sound.” This can be translated to: Am I supposed to say bad things about my own husband? Ah, my poor husband, who will love you when I, your wife since three hours ago, have been saying awful things about you? But why, you villain, did you kill my cousin? Probably because my evil cousin would have killed my husband. I’m not going to cry any tears. I would cry with joy that Romeo is alive, but I should cry tears of grief because Tybalt is dead. My husband, who Tybalt wanted to kill, is alive. Tybalt, who wanted to kill my husband, is dead. All this is comforting news. Why, then, should I cry? There is news worse than the news that Tybalt is dead, news that makes me want to die. I would be glad to forget about it, but it weighs on my memory like sins linger in guilty minds. “Tybalt is dead, and Romeo has been banished.” In this, she changes her mind which brings us back the idea of change and making choices. Juliet kept saying how Romeo was evil but then she started to say that Tybalt was evil and said that she should be happy. How is it that Juliet has only met and married Romeo in such short time when she knew Tybalt for a long time and just now says Tybalt was bad? We are once again noticing how they jump to conclusions before seeing and getting more information about what happened. I think we should keep the idea of jumping into conclusions in our minds.

  10. In Act 3 Scene 2 of the play Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare, Juliet finds out that her newlywed husband just killed her cousin and is banished as a result. Of course, she immediately starts moaning about her cousin’s death and is angry at Romeo for killing him.

    “O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face! Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave? Beautiful tyrant! fiend angelical! Dove-feather’d raven! wolvish-ravening lamb! Despised substance of divinest show! Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st, A damned saint, an honourable villain! O nature, what hadst thou to do in hell, When thou didst bower the spirit of a fiend In moral paradise of such sweet flesh? Was ever book containing such vile matter So fairly bound? O that deceit should dwell In such a gorgeous palace!”

    In these lines, Juliet expresses her anger to Romeo through a series of dualities and basically calls him a curse in disguise as a blessing. However, Juliet still loves Romeo and, after a few moments, realizes she should be sad her husband was banished. Juliet also realizes that Romeo wouldn’t have killed Tybalt unless Tybalt was planning on killing Romeo. At this point in the scene, a fairly major change overtakes Juliet. She goes from being angry at her husband and mourning Tybalt’s death to being angry at Tybalt and mourning Romeo banishment.

    “Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband? Ah, poor my lord, what tongue shall smooth thy name, When I, thy three-hours wife, have mangled it? But, wherefore, villain, didst thou kill my cousin? That villain cousin would have kill’d my husband: Back, foolish tears, back to your native spring; Your tributary drops belong to woe, Which you, mistaking, offer up to joy. My husband lives, that Tybalt would have slain; And Tybalt’s dead, that would have slain my husband: All this is comfort; wherefore weep I then?”

    Obviously, this shows a huge change in Juliet as a character. We always knew she would choose Romeo over any Capulet, but this is the first example of that. When Juliet faced a very difficult choice, she chose a Montague over a Capulet. This change in Juliet is very sudden, she goes from being extremely sad to being happy in a single sentence. Overall, I believe this scene and act are the turning point in the story from where Romeo and Juliet are just impulsive lovers to being a separated married couple.

  11. In Act III, scene ii, we see Juliet and the Nurse’s reactions to the events that occurred in Act III, scene i. In the previous scene Tybalt and Mercutio get in a fight and Tybalt kills Mercutio. Following that, Romeo goes on to fight Tybalt out of anger and kills him. Tybalt is Juliet’s cousin so at first she is heartbroken and mad at Romeo. “A damned saint, an honourable villain!” Juliet is saying that evil exists inside of this man that seemed to be a saint. The Nurse jumps right on with Juliet and goes on about how terrible men are. “There’s no trust,/ No faith, no honesty in men…/Shame come to Romeo!” After hearing the Nurse talk badly about Romeo, Juliet has her sudden change of heart. “Blister’d be thy tongue/For such a wish!” Here Juliet is wishing horrible pain on the Nurse. She is saying that the nurse can’t talk badly about her husband. I think that Juliet probably realized that the only reason Romeo would kill someone is for good reason, and that Tybalt must have done something. Juliet doesn’t have any information on what led up to Tybalt death. All they know is that he is dead and that Romeo killed him. It makes sense for Juliet to be mad first. She is confused and heartbroken and that comes out as anger. Once the Nurse started talking badly about her one true love her confusion diminishes. She knows that Romeo has always been against fighting, so it doesn’t make sense. She has more faith in Romeo than in Tybalt, and believes that Tybalt must be at fault. I think that this scene adds to our understanding and the strength of Romeo and Juliet’s love. Throughout the play we have seen how close the Nurse and Juliet are, and how much Juliet loves her. For Juliet to all of the sudden wish horrible pain on her shows how much she loves Romeo.

  12. In Act 3 Scene 2 of the play Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare, Juliet learns that Romeo killed her cousin, Tybalt. Knowing that Romeo is her husband and still technically killed someone in his own family angered her a lot. She expressed her anger by saying:

    O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face! Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave? Beautiful tyrant! fiend angelical! Dove-feather’d raven! wolvish-ravening lamb! Despised substance of divinest show! Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st, A damned saint, an honourable villain! O nature, what hadst thou to do in hell, When thou didst bower the spirit of a fiend In moral paradise of such sweet flesh? Was ever book containing such vile matter So fairly bound? O that deceit should dwell In such a gorgeous palace!

    She says that Romeo is something bad hidden in the disguise of something good. She uses many metaphors to express this. However, moments after saying all of this, she realizes that after all of this, Romeo is still her husband. He can’t be that evil. Tybalt must have wanted him dead also and that is why Romeo had to kill him. She realized that she shouldn’t be mourning for the person who died, but for the person who is suffering alive, Romeo. She should be grieving that her husband has been banished.

  13. In Act 3, scene ii, we watch and read as Juliet finds out that Romeo killed her cousin Tybalt. She becomes conflicted because she loves Romeo, and he is her first love, as well as her husband. However, Tybalt is her cousin, and in this case, “blood is thicker than water.” She continues to say,

    O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!
    Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?
    Beautiful tyrant! fiend angelical!
    Dove-feather’d raven! wolvish-ravening lamb!
    Despised substance of divinest show!
    Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st.

    She calls Romeo a serpent with a flower face, or a tyrant as a beautiful angel and she continues to say a dove feathered raven, and more insulting sayings. She elaborates on how Romeo was disguised as the perfect man to love and to marry and now he is a villain, not to be trusted. As the Nurse encourages her on, saying that men are not to be trusted, Juliet says,

    For ’tis a throne where honor may be crowned.
    Sole monarch of the universal earth,
    Oh, what a beast was I to chide at him!

    She defends her husband and his honor because, now that she is a married woman in this time period, her husband comes before all. Even though he killed her cousin. She continues to say that the only reason why Romeo killed Tybalt in the first place was because Tybalt had attempted to kill Romeo and it was purely self defense. Also, she should be crying tears of joy, not tears of happiness because her one true love is alive; however, he is banished. Those words are pain to Juliet’s ears.

    In the beginning of Mercutio and Tybalt’s fight, Romeo was the one trying to prevent it because of the Prince’s orders. Now that he is the one who killed Tybalt, Romeo has now put a strain on his marriage. I wonder what will happen when Romeo is banished and how he will visit Juliet, now that the consequences have increased.

    • Great blog! I like how you said that Romeo put a strain on the marriage by committing to killing Tybalt. I also like how emphasized the fact that Juliet defends Romeo not just because she loves him, but because it was normal for women to put their husbands before anyone else. She definitely did that with Romeo toward Tybalt. Great work!

  14. In the lines above, Juliet goes through a huge character transformation. She used to be a lovely little maiden, waiting for her Romeo. Now she is taking control of her feelings, because she is very smart and well-grounded. In the first set of lines Juliet says above, she is asking how someone as lovely as Romeo could have such a serpent heart and deceive her. Therefore our lovable nurse agrees with Juliet, saying that all men are like this and that Romeo should be ashamed. However, Juliet responds to this by saying that the nurse’s tongue should be blistered for saying that Romeo should be ashamed, and Juliet justifies this by saying that Romeo was not born into shame and that she was a beast for scolding him behind his back. The nurse asks her if she should be justifying the actions of someone who killed her cousin. Juliet replies by asking how could she say anything cruel about her husband. Tybalt died, but her husband lives. If Tybalt lived, Romeo would’ve been the one that died. Hearing that Romeo is banished is like the death of one thousand Tybalts. Juliet is saying knowing that Romeo is alive, but not allowed to see her hurts her the most. She even goes as far as to say that Romeo being banished is like everyone she has ever known, including herself and Romeo, being killed. The pain is just unimaginable. It looks like Shakespeare organized this scene to be like the stages of grief. First she denies that Romeo did something horrible, then she is angry with Romeo for killing someone, then she regrets saying angry things about Romeo, and finally she compares his banishment to the death of everyone she has ever loved. She is depressed and hopeless. Of course, she tells her nurse to go and find him, so she can see him again, but that is going to be so dangerous. I thought that it was interesting that we see a new side to Juliet right after Romeo goes through a transformation. In act 3 of the play, each of the characters go through an important development very quickly.

  15. In Scene ii of Act III, Romeo’s fate as an exile is sealed with Tybalt’s death being the lock. Word of this spreads quickly through the town, and Juliet soon learns that her sweet and loving husband is responsible for the death of her cousin. When she discovers this newfound information, she experiences mixed emotions that are very scattered and contrast each other.

    Lines 79-91 is the first emotions that pass through her mind. They are filled with anger, which is a common method for dealing with grief. “O serpent heart hid with flow’ring face! Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave? Beautiful tyrant, fiend angelical!” Juliet is expressing how outraged she is that Romeo appears to be perfect, yet she believes that he is a monster. Neither she nor the nurse know the justification behind Romeo’s rash actions, which contributes to the anger felt by the two characters.

    Next, we read Juliet’s second train of thoughts. After some time to process the events, she must realize that Romeo is not a murdering scoundrel, and that Tybalt must have done something to cause the fight. After all, he is thirsty for blood all day and all night. “He was not born to shame. Upon his brow shame is ashamed to sit, For ‘it’s a throne where honor may be crowned. Some monarch of the universal Earth. O, what a beast was I to chide at him!”(Lines.100-104). Juliet now processes that Romeo is no monster, and takes back every spiteful comment she made about him in the past three minutes. We as readers and the audience know the motive for Romeo’s actions, but the Capulets do not. This suggests that at the end of the day, Juliet still must have feelings for Romeo to not hate him entirely.

    Juliet makes her third and final speech from lines 106 to 137. “Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?” This is the beginning of her emotional rebuttal to the nurse that has learned to despise Romeo. She is explaining that Romeo is truly good hearted and proves that she loves him. “That villain cousin would have killed my husband.”(Line.111). Married for three hours as she states in her second phase of emotions, and yet her love is more real than any she has ever felt before. One can only imagine how much love it must take for Juliet to accept Romeo even after what he has done to her cousin. “‘Tybalt is dead and Romeo is banishèd,’ That ‘banishèd,’ that one word ‘banishèd,’ Hath slain ten thousand Tybalts.”(Lines.123-125). Juliet is heartbroken that Romeo is exiled, and could care less about Tybalt. With these words, she emphasizes that ten thousand Tybalts would need to be slain for her to experience the same pain she does for Romeo being banished from the town. This is her mind changing from the anger and grief to the too reasonable and caring wife that we’ve come to known.

  16. In this scene and portion of text definitely demonstrates a great change in Juliets character. Juliet quickly shifts her sadness over the loss of her cousin to fierce rage at the idea that what Romeo did was remotely wrong. She immediately jumps to Romeo’s defense. Juliet’s actually committed to him, she refuses to allow his name to be slandered. She will not allow herself to think of Romeo as a villian and automatically comes to the right conclusion that Tybalt was in the wrong. She kind of indicates that she believes Tybalt deserved to die if it meant Romeo would live. She says, “But, wherefore, villian, didst thou kill my cousin? That villian cousin would have kill’d my husband…. My husband lives, that Tybalt would have slain; And Tybalt’s dead that would have slain my husband;” Juliet is clearly trying to rationalize Romeo’s mirdering of her cousin because she’s so head over heels for him she forbids herself from thinking negatively about him. Juliet can’t realize that what Romeo did was wrong, she can’t analyze the situation for a second. This text perfectly shows The effect Romeo has had on Juleit and the change in Juliets personality. She is in such a newlywed phase of her relationship with Romeo she has yet to see his outstanding flaws. She also refuses to see his flaws when they are blatantly shoved in her face. She has switched a domicile, sweet, and intelligent girl who’s polite and well mannered, to this girl who’s irrational and somewhat ill tempered and impatient. She refuses to listen to anybody and is jumping leaps and bounds to defend a man she has known for a day. Romeo has brought out the fire and passion from within Juliet. Their while relationship taken more of the melodramatic turn. Banishment is much better than death, she should just be happy the person she loves is alive and breathing even if they can’t be together.

  17. The transformation that Juliet Exhibits in this scene is astonishing. We see how, at the beginning of the scene, Juliet is upset at Romeo, and is scolding him by talking about how brilliant yet sometimes villainous Romeo may be. Then the nurse chimes in. Because the Nurse does not carry much affection for Romeo and states “There’s no trust,/No faith, no honesty in men; all perjured,/All forsworn, all naught, all dissemblers./Ah, where’s my man? give me some aqua vitae:/These griefs, these woes, these sorrows make me old./Shame come to Romeo!”(Act III, Scene ii, Lines 92 – 98) Hearing these words spoken aloud and by someone else, Juliet realizes that he has made a mistake, calling her newlywed husband that she loves so dearly, “A damned saint, an honorable villain!”(Act III, Scene iii, Line 85), she responds by chastising the nurse. Telling her that is a shame itself to shame Romeo, and then proceeds to call herself a beast for chastising his actions. She seems to at first be showing hypocrisy at this point, but in fact, she has undergone this “Transformation”. It’s her realization that she was wrong to chastise Romeo, as she truly believes that he has benevolent intentions. She not only chastises Romeo but also herself, for using the Lord’s name in vain, for there, in her new view, no need to call Romeo out.

  18. In Act 3, Scene 2, Juliet is finding out about Tybalt’s death and Romeo’s banishment, and her mood towards it changes very quickly. At first, she is mournful for her cousin and angry at Romeo, which I think would be the fair judgement at first. She doesn’t know that Tybalt killed Mercutio and Romeo was just getting revenge, so she immediately mourns first. “O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face! / Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave? / Beautiful tyrant! Fiend angelical / Dove-feather’d raven! Wolvish-ravening lamb! / Despised substance of divinest show! / Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st.” (lines 79-84) She comments on how beautiful Romeo is but how awful he is for slaying Tybalt. However, after the Nurse says “Shame come to Romeo!” Juliet gets very protective and defensive. She realizes that Tybalt would have killed Romeo if he didn’t do it first, and she is glad that her husband of three hours is alive, though banished. “Romeo is banished,’ to speak that word, / Is father, mother, Tybalt, Romeo, Juliet, / All slain, all dead. ‘Romeo is banished!’ / There is no end, no limit, measure, bound, / In that word’s death; no words can that woe sound.” (lines 133-137) She quickly changes her view of the situation, and begins saying that Romeo being banished is much worse than Tybalt’s death. I don’t really think this is completely true, seeing as Tybalt was her cousin and Romeo is someone that she met like 2 day ago. I feel like she should have mourned Tybalt for longer, and at least heard the whole story of what happened.

  19. When Juliet finds out that her cousin Tybalt is dead and that her very own husband Romeo killed him she goes into a rage of anger.” O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?Beautiful tyrant! fiend angelical! Dove-feather’d raven! wolvish-ravening lamb!” She feels as though that she has been deceived by Romeo that he betrayed her. She compares him to things that look innocent on the outside but are actually evil. Clearly Juliet is starting to regret Romeo in this part of the scene. However right after the Nurse starts to shame Romeo she immediately starts to get defensive over Romeo.” Blister’d be thy tongue
    For such a wish! he was not born to shame:
    Upon his brow shame is ashamed to sit;
    For ’tis a throne where honour may be crown’d
    Sole monarch of the universal earth.
    O, what a beast was I to chide at him!”. At this moment we can clearly see the confliction in Juliet’s mind. She loves Romeo but Tybalt is her beloved cousin. At this moment she can’t choose whose side to take. Soon however she starts to rethink the whole event and convince herself that Romeo only killed Tybalt because he had to, otherwise Romeo would be the one dead. Now she is relieved that Romeo is alive. However from now on their relationship is going to be even harder to continue

  20. The excerpt from Romeo and Juliet act III scene ii shows the nurse’s as well as Juliet’s reactions to finding out Romeo has killed Tybalt. In this specific excerpt, we see Juliet go though different phases of accepting this reality, while the nurse seems to be against Romeo the entire time. The nurse’s initial standpoint is illustrated here: “These griefs, these woes, these sorrows make me old. Shame come to Romeo!” As Juliet slowly makes up her mind on what to make of this, she begins defending Romeo. The nurse’s persistence of her thoughts is illustrated as Juliet begins defending him: “will you speak well of him who kill’d your cousin?” But Juliet has a detailed shift of phases as time goes on in this scene. First, Juliet is outraged: “beautiful devil! Fiend angelic! Dove feathered raven!” She at first believes she has been tricked into loving a terrible person who looks nice on the outside. But the nurse joins in, calling shame upon Romeo, but Juliet does not agree: “blister’d be thy tounge! For such a wish, he was not born to shame” Juliet seems to remember how truly kind hearted Romeo was, and does not believe he deserves thus accusation. Lastly, the nurse reminds her that he killed Tybalt, to which Juliet responds that he, after all, is her husband.

  21. In this scene, Juliet’s nurse tells Juliet about the terrible death of Tybalt. At this news, she was horrified about her new husband, who she married a few hours ago for his looks, was a murderer that killed his new cousin. She compared him to several evil things that are disguised with beautiful looks. She seemed to hate Romeo so much that the nurse said that Romeo was shameful. Juliet then suddenly becomes very offended by what she said like Tybalt had never been part of this scenario. She starts to defend Romeo, although he had killed their cousin. Then she starts saying that not only was Tybalt’s death was sad, but Romeo being banished was a thousand times worse, like everyone she loved has died. She grieves more for a stranger she met a few days ago than a close relative that she knew for years. In my opinion, I think that it makes no logical sense. Sure, she’s still a young teen that is first experiencing love, but basically, she is comparing her whole family dying to a stranger and enemy with looks not being able to see her. That is pretty crazy.

  22. During rhis part if act III, scene ii, we see the Nurse’s and Juliet’s perspective on what happened at the town square that day. At first Juliet is distraught, she does not know what has come overy Romeo, “o serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!”. Juliet doesn’t understand how Romeo could be so cruel. He is son handsome ND nice to Juliet that she never thought that he would have an evil side, and she never thought that one of her family members would perish from the side unseen from Romoe. But then something happens to change her mind. Nurse says that Romeo is a bad person and that shame should come to him, but Juliet does not think so. After hearing that Nurse wants to say, Juliet changes her mind, “Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?” She nows that now that they have been married, that she cannot do something that will dishonor her husband. Juliet goes on to support Romeo and his action, and fully changes her mind on what happened. She tells the Nurse that no shame should come to Romeo, that you cannot blame Romeo for killing Tybalt, because Tybalt would have killed him. She tells the nurse that if it were Tybalt alive like the nurse wants, then that would mean Romeo to be dead, the love of Juliet’s life. She even goes on to say that Romeo being banished is worse then Tybalt’s death. “‘Romeo is banished,’ to speak that word,
    Is father, mother, Tybalt, Romeo, Juliet,
    All slain, all dead. ‘Romeo is banished!’”
    She believes now that the worse thing that happened that day was not of her husband slaying Tybalt, out of anger for HW just killed Mercutio but she doesn’t know that, but rather the fact than now, after everything they have done to be together, Romeo is banished and they will never see eachother again. I’m not sure where writers got the idea of a love so strong that in two days they get married, even though their houses are enemies, and they are supposed to hate eachother, and then a cousin gets killed and the wife doesn’t Blain that he us bad for that hehe killing. This is such a fantasy that it hurts.

  23. Juliet has changed throughout the story. When the nurse cursed Romeo, she was extremely offended and was protecting Romeo. She was still crying over Tybalt’s death, but was angry that people were blaming Romeo for his death. She was devastated both over the loss of her cousin, and over the banishment of her husband. I believe that Juliet will change even more throughout the play, based on her choices and actions.

  24. Lady Capulet: ” Cursed, sad, evil day!
    This is the most miserable hour of all time
    In the last hour of the pilgrimage
    But yet one small, poor child
    But a single thing to praise and find happiness in.
    And the cruelness of death has taken it from me.”
    Lady Capulet is genuinely distraught at the loss of her daughter. She doesn’t seem to have an ulterior motive to her sadness. But her sadness is more displayed as rage and regret.
    Nurse: “O horrible! O horrible, horrible, horrible day!
    Most saddening day, most terrible day,
    That I’ve ever lived!
    O day! O day! O day! O vile day!
    Never a day as wretched as this.
    O vile day! O vile day!”
    The nurse is heartbroken over Juliets death. She’s horrified at this loss, and she even says this is pretty much the worst day she’s ever lived. Her heart is broken in two. She loved Juliet as her own and now she’s gone, and they ended on bad terms. She’s pained, even more so than Juliets mother.
    Paris: “Beguiled, separated, betrayed, spited, murdered!
    Most hated death, by the beguiled.
    By evil, evil those have done.
    O love! To life! not living, but loving her from the grave!”
    I feel like Paris isn’t really sad that Juliet is gone, but what losing her actually represents. He is losing her wife to be. This doesn’t seem like a genuine reaction to losing someone who care about, like the Nurse or Lady Capulet. It sometimes seems from Paris that he’s only sad because he can’t get married now. This is like a proclamation to love Juliet from the grave.
    Capulet: “Hated, in trouble, loathed, a saint, slain!
    A shaky, uncomfortable time has come upon us.
    To murder us all?
    O daughter! O daughter! me not my child.
    Death come to me because alas my child is dead.
    With my daughter is all my happiness has died.”
    Similarly to the Nurse and Lady Capulet, this genuine sadness. He is a father mourning for his daughter. When he wishes to have died instead and laments how his happiness has been buried with Juliet, you can see the regret interwoven with his pain. He feels awful at the way she’s treated his daughter in the past. He wants nothing more to have taken the place of his daughter because of her untimely death. But the only weird part is when he refers to her death as an uncomfortable time. Is it uncomfortable because Tybalt just died and Juliet was supposed to be married the next day? Life was almost peaceful for the Capulets, but now there solemnity has been slain. The Cpaulets are pained, and are deeply regretful. Regretful for how they spent the time with their daughter in her final days.

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