It is enough I may but call her mine.

This evening, please paraphrase and then analyze Romeo’s speech below.  Next, you must then compare it to the Friar’s speech beneath it.

What perpetual truth does each speaker express in his lines?  What possible outcome does the imagery foreshadow in each quotation?

Don’t forget: you must analyze both speeches and comment on the analysis of your classmates as well.

Amen, amen! But come what sorrow can,
It cannot countervail the exchange of joy
That one short minute gives me in her sight.
Do thou but close our hand with holy words,
Then love-devouring death do what he dare –
It is enough I may but call her mine.
 
These violent delights have violent ends
And in their triumph die, like fire and powder,
Which as they kiss, consume.
The sweetest honey
Is loathsome in his own deliciousness
And in the taste confounds the appetite.
Therefore love moderately; long love doth so;
Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow.
 
R&J blog #10

33 thoughts on “It is enough I may but call her mine.

  1. ROMEO:
    Amen, amen! But come what sorrow can,
    Yes, Yes! But whatever bad to come,
    It cannot countervail the exchange of joy
    It can’t do away with the joy
    That one short minute gives me in her sight.
    That one minute with her gives me.
    Do thou but close our hand with holy words,
    When you marry us with holy words
    Then love-devouring death do what he dare
    Then death can do what he will
    –It is enough I may but call her mine.
    It is enough that she is mine.

    FRIAR LAWRENCE:
    These violent delights have violent ends
    These sudden loves have sudden ends
    And in their triumph die, like fire and powder,
    And in their love die, like fire and powder
    Which as they kiss, consume.
    Which as they kiss consume
    The sweetest honey
    The sweetest joy
    Is loathsome in his own deliciousness
    Is loathsome in his happiness
    And in the taste confounds the appetite.
    In the taste is where the appetite is.
    Therefore love moderately; long love doth so;
    That’s why you love moderately; Then you will love for a long time
    Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow.
    Too fast is no good as is too slow.

    In this scene, Romeo and Juliet are getting married. These speeches are what Friar Lawrence and Romeo are saying to each other before Juliet arrives. Friar Lawrence says to Romeo how the marriage may make people mad and Romeo responds with his speech. He says that whatever bad is to come it can’t overpower the love they have for each other. He also says that once they are married death can do what he wants. All that matters is that he got to call Juliet his. This is foreshadowing as to what happens at the end of the book. As we know they kill themselves. I have a sort of none related question: Why does Shakespeare need to foreshadow when we know what happens from the prologue? Anyway, back to the blog. In his speech, Romeo is saying that as long as they are married, he will be happy. Friar Lawrence responds with his speech. In his speech, he says how all good things come to an end. He tells Romeo to love moderately as to not use it up. He says how to fast is bad as well as too slow. This is also foreshadowing because Romeo and Juliet love each other so much that they might crash their car of love.

    • Your paraphrasing is really great, and it makes the speeches more clear. I like how you covered the opposite approaches Romeo and Friar Lawrence have. Friar Lawrence tells Romeo that marriage can make people crazy. But Romeo responds by saying that nothing can tear him and Juliet apart once they are married. Also, I like how you said that Friar Lawrence is basically saying that good things come to an end, and the metaphor of their “car of love” you used at the end. Great work!

  2. Romeo’s speech paraphrased means-

    Amen, amen! Sorrow may come our way,
    but it will not interfere this feeling of happy
    I get when she looks at me.
    Say your prayer so her and I can marry,
    Then let death try to tear us apart-
    I will be satisfied to be able to call her mine.

    In Romeo’s speech, he is saying that no matter what happens to his relationship with Juliet, once they are married, he will be satisfied with his life. This shows that Romeo wants to take things fast. His world revolves around Juliet, similar to how a young lover immediately falls for someone, and it changes their lives when that person likes them back. This could be why Friar Lawrence’s speech is so different. He is older, and wiser. He’s had a different experience than Romeo. Also, he is more aware of the dangers Romeo has in store for loving the daughter of Capulet. In his speech, Friar Lawrence is saying-

    This dangerous love could have a dangerous end
    you can try to keep this love together, but it will explode,
    And when you kiss, it will blow up.
    Even sweet honey
    is repulsed by this, even though honey is very sweet
    Therefore its taste confuses the eater.
    So love carefully, and love as long as you can;
    the end will come soon, but too late.

    Friar Lawrence is all about taking time, and peace and balance. When he first entered the play, all he spoke about was the balance of good and bad in the world. Now he warns Romeo about the dangers of diving into this marriage too quickly, and making his love with Juliet public. He warns Romeo that he must “love moderately,” in other words, he must keep this romance a secret. He also foreshadows an end to the relationship. Romeo foreshadows how death and sorrow can try to part Romeo and Juliet, and yet that’s exactly what is going to happen.

    • Great job! You showed a great understanding of the two speeches and how Friar Lawrence is telling Romeo not to rush things. Keep up the great work!

    • Great Job, Ashley! Your paraphrasing was terrific and your analysis was fantastic. You showed a great knowledge of this novel, and scenes in particular. Keep up the great work!

  3. In tonights reading of Romeo and Juliet, by WIlliam Shakespeare, Romeo urges that he marries Juliet and he tells Friar Lawrence that even the bad can’t hurt him. He says, “Amen, amen! But come what sorrow can, It cannot countervail the exchange of joy That one short minute gives me in her sight. Do thou but close our hand with holy words,Then love-devouring death do what he dare –It is enough I may but call her mine.” This can be translated to, Amen Amen! Whatever misfortunes come our way, they can’t ruin the happiness I feel when I just look at her. All you have to do, is marry us while saying your holy words, then till death will we part. It’s enough for me if I can call her mine. Friar Lawrence then says, “These violent delights have violent ends And in their triumph die, like fire and powder, Which as they kiss, consume.The sweetest honey Is loathsome in his own deliciousness And in the taste confounds the appetite.Therefore love moderately; long love doth so; Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow.” This can be translated to, these sudden joys don’t last forever, they can have sudden endings. They burn up in victory. When they kiss, they explode. Too much of something sweet is delicious, but it will make you sick. Therefore love each other in moderation, not over doing it but not underdoing it. That’s the key to a long-lasting love. Too fast can be just as bad as too good. Both of these speeches show duality. Duality is an instance of opposition or contrast. The two speeches differ when Romeo explains how the worst of things, can’t destroy the happiest of things, while Friar Lawrence says, that the happiest of things can come to an end. Friar Lawrence also mentions, “Therefore love moderately.” This shows how Friar Lawrence is trying to calm down Romeo and is trying to bring him back to reality. These speeches foreshadow that Romeo and Juliet can’t rush anything or make rash decisions because those don’t always end well. Romeo stated, “love-devouring death” in the future Romeo and Juliet, as we all know, die because they want to love each other peacefully.

    • Great blog! I love how you brought up the topic of duality and how Romeo and Friar Lawrence’s speeches contradict one another. Your analysis was amazing. Keep up the good work! 🙂

  4. As Act II concluded, Romeo still wants to marry Juliet very badly. He urges Friar Laurence that everything will be fine and he’s only get married for the better. He says:

    ROMEO:
    Amen, amen. But whatever misfortunes occur,
    they can’t ruin the joy and happiness
    I feel with one look at her.
    All you have to do is join our hands with holy words,
    then love-destroying death can do whatever it wants
    It’s enough for me if I can call her mine.

    The Friar responds by saying:

    FRIAR LAWRENCE:
    These sudden joys have sudden endings.
    They burn up in victory like fire and gunpowder.
    When they kiss, they explode.
    The sweetest and best tasting honey
    Too much honey is delicious,
    but it makes you feel sick to your stomach
    Therefore, love each other in moderation, which is important to long-lasting love.
    Too fast is as bad as too slow.

    These speeches are very different in meaning. Romeo explains that he must marry Juliet and that he will very Juliet very dearly more than anything else. He goes on say that regardless of what bad things happen, nothing can ruin the love, joy, and happiness shared by Romeo and Juliet. Next, he tells the Friar that all that is left is for him to join their hands together with holy words and wed them, so Romeo can finally call her his. It is evident that Romeo just wants to get married more than anything else, even if it isn’t the smartest idea. On the flip side, Friar Lawrence, the speech was very different than Romeo’s. The Friar is older, wiser, and definitely more intelligent than Romeo, which is important when discussing the topic of marriage and love. Friar Lawrence explains that Romeo should really hold on, and think deeply before making a life-changing decision, like marriage. He warns Romeo about the dangers of getting married right now and advises him to love moderately which would be beneficial to him. When speaking, the Friar also foreshadows the ending of this story, by making references to the death of Romeo and Juliet. For example, he says that sudden joys have sudden endings, too much love can be harmful, and “And in their triumph die, like fire and powder,
    Which as they kiss, consume.” I wonder what will happen in the coming scenes of Romeo and Juliet, and how their relationship will evolve and progress throughout the course of the story. I hope to read more and learn more about Romeo, Juliet, and their everlasting love story.

  5. Amen, amen! If sorrow comes to us
    It cannot overpower the joy I feel
    After seeing her for even one minute.
    If you join us in marriage,
    The love-stopping death can do whatever he wants –
    We will not be forced apart.

    Dangerous happiness can lead to a bad end
    And your triumph can come to an end, like fire and powder,
    When they come together, destroy.
    The sweetest honey
    Is bad in its own way
    And when you taste it, you lose your appetite.
    So don’t love her too much; lasting love is like this;
    It comes too late and too slow.

    In his speech, Romeo is stating how he loves Juliet a lot and how he will not be separated from her. Friar Lawrence is warning Romeo not to become too in love with Juliet, because their love might lead to a bad end. Friar Lawrence is foreshadowing Romeo and Juliet’s death in his speech. Romeo does not really think through the consequences of his decision to marry Juliet so quickly. He is very impulsive, and wants to be with Juliet always. Romeo does not think through his plans, and is too swept away with Juliet to care. And even though Friar Lawrence is warning Romeo not to be too upset if their relationship does not work out, Romeo does not listen.

    • I liked your blog. Something I especially liked was your interpretation of Romeo’s lines and the Friar’s lines. Many of your interpretations were completely different from mine, and I like seeing this topic from a new angle.

  6. Romeo:

    Amen, Amen! Whatever grief may happen,
    It can’t ruin the joy
    That I get by looking at her for a minute.
    If you make us married,
    Then death, which ends love, can try to split us –
    I am satisfied by calling Juliet mine.

    Friar:

    These sudden pleasures have sudden endings
    And burn like fire and gunpowder in victory,
    Which are joined in a kiss,
    The best honey
    Is sickening,
    If you overindulge,
    As a result, be restrained in love; to lengthen your love;
    Love that is too quick is as bad as a love that is too slow.

    In the above lines, Romeo states love’s strength and power. Romeo mentions that whatever may happen because of our marriage, it will have been worth it. He further goes on to say, even looking at Juliet makes me happy. Romeo concludes by saying if we get married not even death can break us apart and that being married to Juliet satisfies all his dreams. Friar Lawrence has gained much wisdom over his life. He has seen the impulsiveness of Romeo and Juliet and so decides to warn them before he marries them. The Friar says you will experience intense pain from this pleasure. The final piece of advice given by the Friar is don’t love to passionately because everything is good in moderation. In these lines, the Friar forecast what happens at the end of this tragedy, but also gives a lesson the audience could take away from the play.

  7. Amen, amen! Sorrow must come,
    But it cannot stop the passing of joy
    That one short glance at her gives me
    We close our hands with holy words,
    And love-eating death does something daring
    It’s already enough that I call her mine

    The dangerous rewards have bad endings
    And in their happiness they die, like fire and powder
    Which they comsune as they kiss
    The best honey
    Is still horrible as it is good
    And the taste overrides the appetite
    Therefore love carefully, as long love does
    Too fast ends badly, likewise too slow.

    Romeo and the Friar have two very different outlooks on Romeo’s love with Juliet. Romeo is talking about how the obstacles in their relationship are fully and truly trumped by their love for eachother. But, Romeo does know that there will be tough times, but he does not seem to care. He is more realistic in this speech, but still says that love and joy will always push away the fears and danger of their relationship. The Friar wants Romeo to take a slower and more cautious path for his relationship. He tells Romeo that everything has a bad side to it, no matter how amazing it’s good side is. Thus, he is saying that while Juliet may seem completely perfect at the moment, she most likely has a flaw that Romeo will have to deal with. He also tells Romeo to love carefully, for the reasons that he stated in the first part of his speech. He tells Romeo that if he doesn’t love carefully and slowly, that their relationship will end up becoming sour and won’t work out in the end.

  8. ROMEO
    Amen, Amen. No matter how sad or pained I may feel
    It will not be greater than the amount of joy
    That one minute of being with her brings me
    Hurry now and marry us,
    Then even death will not be able to separate us,
    As she will finally be my wife

    FRIAR LAWRENCE
    This strong type of joy comes to a sudden end
    And this sudden end is like an explosion
    As you kiss, you shall drink sweet honey,
    Which in its terrible deliciousness
    Rids one of any appetite
    So love each other softly so that you may love each other longer
    A love that is too fast is just as lacking as a love that is too slow

    There is a stark, almost black and white contrast between the tone and theme of Romeo’s speech and Friar Lawrence’s speech. Romeo’s speech consists of talk of love and of happy things such as how happy he will be once Juliet is finally his wife, and how nothing could make him as sorrowful as Juliet makes him happy. This type of speech could be seen as almost too happy, and one could almost think of this thought process as immature. Meanwhile, Friar Lawrence’s speech is more cautious, telling Romeo to be slow and steady in loving Juliet. Although his speech is of a darker tone, it still seems to be of an overall wiser speech.

  9. Romeo:

    Amen, Amen! Whatever grief may happen,
    It can’t ruin the joy
    That I get by looking at her for a minute.
    If you make us married,
    Then death, which ends love, can try to split us –
    I am satisfied by calling Juliet mine.

    Friar:

    These sudden pleasures have sudden endings
    And burn like fire and gunpowder in victory,
    Which are joined in a kiss,
    The best honey
    Is sickening,
    If you overindulge,
    As a result, be restrained in love; to lengthen your love;
    Love that is too quick is as bad as a love that is too slow.

    In this speech, Romeo says that no matter what happens, Romeo and Juliet will always be happy together. Then, he talks about how strong his love is for Juliet and even goes on saying that anything bad that happens is outweighed by the greatness of even just looking at Juliet for a minute. He tells the friar that if he makes them married, even the dark, evil death cannot break them apart because of their bond of love. The friar goes on to say that their impulsiveness can cause their own demise. If they act too quickly, and love each other too much, too fast and decide to get married, their sudden love will be destroyed very quickly. Quick love is as bad as love that is too slow.

    • Great job, Aniket. I agreed with many of your points, and your paraphrase of their speeches backs up your statements. Keep it up.

  10. Romeo’s speech paraphrased:

    Yes, yes! But whatever bad things happen,
    It cannot outweigh the joy
    That I am given in one short minute
    If you will only join us together with holy words
    Then love-destroying death do what he does
    It is enough that I can call her mine

    Friar Lawrence’s speech paraphrased:

    These brutal pleasures have brutal endings
    And in their success die, like fire and gunpowder
    Which as they kiss, destroy.
    The sweetest honey
    Is repulsive in its own deliciousness
    And in the taste ruins your appetite
    Thus, love in moderation; Long love shall follow
    Too fast is as bad as too slow

    In Romeo’s speech, he proclaims how delightful it would be to be with Juliet for just one minute, even if bad things occur later. He implores Friar Lawrence to marry them together so that he can call her his, and he does not care what happens afterwards. His lines may be interpreted as reciting the never-changing truth that people will do many things for happiness, albeit short lived. In the line, “Then love-devouring death do what he dare –It is enough I may but call her mine,“ Romeo states his desire to be married to Juliet, even if it may result in death. Friar Lawrence continues with his point, declaring that delights still have violent endings. Like fire and gunpowder, they live to serve a purpose, but as they ‘kiss’, they destroy themselves and others. Also similar is honey, which, is delicious, but too much of it will ruin your appetite. Friar Lawrence finally ends, advising them both not to love too much, or too little. Coupled with his previous statements of opposites, the theme of balance or equality is shown.

  11. In tonight’s reading, Romeo and Juliet come up with a time and place to get married and then go to the Friars to do so. While there, Friar Lawrence says,

    “Amen, amen. But come what sorrow can,
    It cannot countervail the exchange of joy
    That one short minute gives me in her sight.
    Do thou but close our hand with holy words,
    Then love-devouring death do what he dare-
    It is enough I may but call her mine.

    These violent delights have violent ends
    And in their triumph die, like fire and powder,
    Which as they kiss consume.
    The sweetest honey
    Is loathsome in its own deliciousness
    And in the taste confounds the appetite.
    Therefore love moderately; long love doth so;
    To swift arrives as tardy as too slow.” (ll. 1-15, pages 110-111).

    When paraphrased,

    “Amen, amen. But whatever bad occurs,
    It doesn’t change the fact of the joy
    I feel with one look at her.
    All that is needed is you to join our hands in marriage,
    Then destroying death may do what he chooses-
    All I need is to call her mine.

    These sudden delights have sudden endings
    They burn up as if they are fire and powder,
    A kiss causes them to blow up.
    The sweetest honey
    Is delicious, yet a lot of it
    Makes you sick to your stomach.
    Therefore love moderately, this is the key to long love;
    Too fast is as bad as too slow.”

    I found this passage very interesting. It continues the Friars rhetoric of duality. For instance, honey is good, yet too much of it is bad. To me, this also further reveals Friar as a responsible and positive influence on Romeo. He warns Romeo to keep his love in check or their relationship will burn out. This actually seems to foreshadow the rest of the plot, as well. As far as I know, Romeo and Juliet continue to act so romantic as the story progresses, leading to their eventual death. I find this interesting because of all the characters, Shakespeare uses Friar. I think he is again trying to point out the Friar’s maturity. This also presents another theme, that of maturity as Romeo and Juliet both have older, wiser mentors that help them. Overall, this reading was quite helpful and allowed the story to progress nicely.

  12. Romeo: Amen, amen, come what sorrow can bring,
    It cannot counter the exchange of joy
    That only a little bit of time gives me when she is in my sight.
    Do it now and put us together within the holy words in marriage.
    Then death, the one that can take away love, can do whatever it wants,
    It is enough to say that she is mine.

    Romeo is saying that sorrow cannot hurt the joy he feels whenever he is with Juliet. He then asks the Friar to marry them with his holy words. After that, he does not care what death does, and he feels that it is enough to say that Juliet is his lover and wife. I think that the 5th line foreshadows the death of Romeo.

    Friar: This powerful delight has a powerful ending,
    And in victory, they die, like fire and powder,
    Which when they kiss, they shall consume
    The sweetest honey
    That is loathing itself for its deliciousness
    And its taste surprises your appetite.
    So love fairly so your love will last for a long time.
    Too fast arrives as late as too slow.

    The Friar Lawrence is saying that the two should love fairly to maintain a long relationship. Their kisses will make you feel so powerful and sweet that it makes you want more. If they ask for too much, their relationship will not last long. While Romeo gave a cheerful and romantic tone in his voice, saying that nothing will shake the happiness of being married to Juliet, Lawrence sounds a bit cautious, as he is saying that they should take watch to their relationship, or it would not last very long, which kind of foreshadow the deaths of these star-crossed lovers.

  13. Romeo paraphrased:
    Amen, amen. But even with setbacks,
    It will not destroy the joy I feel
    with one moment of looking at her.
    Bring us together with holy words,
    then love-devouring death can do whatever it wants,
    as long as I can call her mine.

    Friar Lawrence paraphrased:
    Dangerous love can have a sudden end,
    Like fire and powder,
    When they meet with a kiss, they explode. The sweetest honey
    is repulsive and delicious at the same time
    This taste confuses appetites.
    So love softly and slowly, and in control, then, it will last long
    Love too fast is bad, but so is love too slow.

    Even with the difficulties, Romeo’s love for Juliet will not change. Romeo will face these challenges, and will not let it interfere with his love for Juliet. Having Juliet with him is enough. It doesn’t matter that they are enemies, it doesn’t matter if their parents don’t accept their marriage, Romeo still will marry and love Juliet. He will not lets these setbacks hold him from marrying the girl he loves. However, if they get married, Romeo will be faced with even more challenges. It’s not going to get better from there. Romeo thinks that having Juliet is enough, and that with her, he and their love will triumph. However, it is their love that is going to cause more challenges, and that is why Friar Lawrence is telling Romeo to take it slow. Even if Romeo believes that their love is pure and true, dangerous love, like Romeo and Juliet’s, can end tragically. They should take it slow, and think about the decisions they make before going straight at them, that is the key for long-lasting love.

  14. Lines to paraphrase:

    Amen, amen! But come what sorrow can,
    It cannot countervail the exchange of joy
    That one short minute gives me in her sight.
    Do thou but close our hand with holy words,
    Then love-devouring death do what he dare–
    It is enough I may but call her mine.

    Yes, yes! Sorry may come
    But it cannot overthrow the feeling of joy
    That I get from one look at her
    Bind our hands in holy marriage
    Love overpowers death
    I’m lucky to call her mine

    These violent delights have violent ends
    And in their triumph die, like fire and powder,
    Which as they kiss, consume.
    The sweetest honey
    Is loathsome in his own deliciousness
    And in the taste confounds the appetite.
    Therefore love moderately; long love doth so;
    Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow.

    This risky relationship could have a dangerous ending
    After their victory they die
    Once you kiss it will die out
    Even the best of loves
    Has its own cons or negativity
    When you feel that taste, you lose interest
    So go slow and take your time
    Going too fast can make you slow in another way

    Both of these lines and conversations are different but have a similar meaning. The main meaning of these lines is that everything good in life comes with it’s our cons. In life you have to take the good and the bad in order to be happy. Shakespeare is saying that although Romeo and Juliet’s life and love story together were amazing they also came with a price. Whenever anyone talks about wanting a love story like Romeo and Juliet’s, they always add but without the tragedy and dying. But that was Shakespeare’s plan all along, he wanted us to know that no matter what all the good in the world, needs a little bad in order to be perfect. In the first speech Romeo is saying that all the bad can come to him as long as he gets to spend his time with his love, Juliet. He’s saying but he doesn’t mind being put through pain and suffering (including the kind he went through with Rosaline) If it means that he will be able to spend his life with Juliet and be completely in love with her.

    • I love how you added that you have to take the good with the bad in order to be happy. If you don’t except the bad things in life, you will never get over them and won’t be happy. Great job!

  15. Romeo:
    Amen, amen! But come what sorrow can,
    It cannot countervail the exchange of joy
    That one short minute gives me in her sight.
    Do thou but close our hand with holy words,
    Then love-devouring death do what he dare –
    It is enough I may but call her mine

    Paraphrased:
    Amen Amen! Let anything sorrowful come
    For it cannot disrupt this moment of joy
    This one moment in which I am with her
    shall seal this marriage with holy words
    Then death can do as it pleases
    Because the only thing I wanted in life is to call her my

    In this speech Romeo shows that he can’t ever be more happier in his life. It is clear in this speech that Juliet and his love for her is his entire world. However he is failing to realize how hastily he is going with it. This speech shows that Romeo’s love may have blinded him from logical truths. This is evident when he states that he could die at this moment and be happy. He is absolutely obsessed with Juliet that she has become a goal of achievement for him instead of a true love.

    Friar Lawrence:
    These violent delights have violent ends
    And in their triumph die, like fire and powder,
    Which as they kiss, consume.
    The sweetest honey
    Is loathsome in his own deliciousness
    And in the taste confounds the appetite.
    Therefore love moderately; long love doth so;
    Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow.

    Paraphrased
    This dangerous Love is bound to have a violent demise
    And in their highest point they will die like fire and powder
    When they kiss they take part in their greatest joy
    This joy brings satisfaction to their life
    love reasonably as long as it lasts
    For if it is too fast it would be the same if it was too late.

    Friar Lawrence does not in any way try to persuade Romeo and Juliet to slow it down a bit, but he still knows what they are doing is a little too unreasonable. The friar does however warn Romeo and Juliet of all the dangers that are off to come of this love because he wants it to last. The friar clearly sees the potential and hope this relationship can do for the long run, but he also knows that 2 kids are risking their lives for this name of love

  16. Amen, amen. But come what sorrow can,
    It cannot countervail the exchange of joy
    That one short minute gives me in her sight.
    Do thou but close our hands with holy words,
    Then love-devouring death do what he dare,
    It is enough I may but call her mine.
    FRIAR LAWRENCE:
    These violent delights have violent ends
    And in their triumph die, like fire and powder,
    Which, as they kiss, consume. The sweetest honey
    Is loathsome in his own deliciousness
    And in the taste confounds the appetite.
    Therefore love moderately. Long love doth so.
    Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow.
    (II.vi.3-15)

    I am going to paraphrase both speeches first, because that’s always the easiest way to start.
    ROMEO:
    Amen, Amen. But any sadness that may come
    Cannot outweigh the exchange of joy
    That one minute of seeing her gives me.
    If you will only join our hands with holy words,
    Then it doesn’t matter if death takes us,
    I am content with calling her mine.
    FRIAR LAWRENCE:
    These fast relationships have violent ends
    And in their happiness die, like fire and gunpowder,
    Which, as they meet, consume on another. The sweetest honey
    Is hated in its own deliciousness
    And the taste destroys the appetite.
    Therefore love moderately. Love for long.
    To fast arrives as late as too slow.

    This clearly foreshadows the future for Romeo and Juliet. I mean, Romeo talking about how it doesn’t matter if they die in the end, as long as they are married. And that’s exactly what happens. Romeo and Juliet dying for their love. And it’s ironic when Romeo says that no sadness can outweigh the joy he feels when he sees Juliet, but what if he never sees Juliet again? I mean, he says it’s okay if he dies, but he’ll never get to experience a life with Juliet. We all know he doesn’t have much time before he has to stop seeing her, whether he likes it or not. Then we see all of Friar Lawrence’s metaphors, which are confusing enough, even if they were written the way they would be said today. “These violent delights have violent ends.” That’s pretty ominous. Relationships like Romeo and Juliet’s that are rushed into often end badly. “And in their triumph die….” Seriously, it’s like this guy can predict the future. There are clues being thrown left and right, especially in this scene. He says that “The sweetest honey / is loathsome in his own deliciousness….” Meaning, even the sweetest, best tasting honey, can end badly despite its great taste. No, because of its great taste. Like how someone’s greatest strength can also be his greatest weakness. And he finishes off with a lesson: love moderately, love for a long time, because rushing into something is just not a good idea. (Seriously though, how does Romeo not take offense at some of these comments? I mean, Friar Lawrence is directly chiding Romeo for his life choices, even though he’s the one who’s about to marry Romeo and Juliet.)

  17. Romeo:
    Amen, amen! But come what sorrow can
    It cannot countervail the exchange of joy
    That one short minute gives me in her sight.
    Do thou but close our hand with holy words,
    Then love-devouring death do what he dare –
    It is enough I may but call her mine.

    Paraphrased:
    Amen, amen! Let sorrow come by
    It cannot oversahdow my joy
    The joy that I feel when I see her for one short minute
    Just close our love with the holy words of matrimony
    Then love destroying death can do whatever it wants
    If I can just call her mine

    Friar Lawrence:
    These violent delights have violent ends
    And in their triumph die, like fire and powder,
    Which as they kiss, consume.
    The sweetest honeyIs loathsome in his own deliciousness
    And in the taste confounds the appetite.
    Therefore love moderately; long love doth so;
    Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow.

    Paraphrased:
    These delights have sudden endings.
    And in their victory it dies, like fire and powder,
    When they kiss, they explode? consume?
    Honey is sweet and delicious but too much can make you sick.
    Therefore, love moderately;
    If you go too fast, it is just as bad as too slow.

    Romeo says his speech about Juliet and how he will love her until the end of time. He is so grateful that he married her and has achieved the one thing in life he found impossible: marrying Juliet and calling her, his own. In response, Friar Lawrence, responds by telling him to take things slow. As they had just met two or three days ago. Also, he says that too much of something can be unhealthy for yourself and for your relationship. Friar Lawrence is the only good influence in Romeo’s life.

  18. “Amen, amen! Sadness may come.
    It cannot counter the joy
    That her love and conversation gives me.
    Close our hands in holy marriage vows,
    The death that kills love can attempt whatever,
    But I’m content enough because I call her mine.”

    “These dangerous delights have terrifying ends,
    And in their success fade, like flames and powders,
    As you kiss, consume me.
    The sweetest sugars
    Is repulsed at its tastefulness
    And the tastes harm the appetite.
    We will love; and love for a long time;
    It arrives quickly as it is late but too slow.”
    Romeo on one hand is very blissful in the moment. He’s honored to call Juliet his. He loves her and everything about her. However, Friar Lawrence is saying that their love is very sugary sweet- too sweet to the point where it’s overbearing. But mostly he’s saying their can be great evils to something that appears to be good and pure on the surface. Romeo can’t even see anything wrong, he’s not being cautious, he’s just happy to be in love with someone who actually loves him back. But as per usual the Friar gives Romeo a fair warning. Something that he loves, something super sweet, pleasing and delicious, can also hurt him the most. Friar is saying their love is dangerous and even though the loves is happy and jolly in the beginning stages, their successful in love may fade away. Basically, Romeo is excited about his relationship and about his love and as usual sees no repurccussions to his actions and on the other hand, Friar wants him to not be impulsive and step back and recognize how his romance with Juliet could easily go downhill.

  19. Romeo’s speech paraphrased:
    Yes of course, but any sadness that has come through me now,
    It can’t get rid of the happiness inside me.
    All I need is to see her for just one minute.
    When you marry us with your holy words,
    Death can do whatever he pleases,
    All I want is her.

    Friar’s Speech:
    These quick lovers will have quick endings.
    There love will die like fire and powder,
    And every kiss they kiss,
    Is filled with the sweetest honey,
    Which is loathsome in his happiness.
    His appetite is in need of that honey.
    Therefore love moderately for now, the long love will come.
    Loving too fast is just as bad as loving too slow.

    I think what Romeo is saying is that he wants to be married immediately. Like we talked about in class, Romeo’s flaw is his quickness and he doesn’t understand the concept of waiting a little while. However, I understand where he is coming from, he might be scared of the future with him and Juliet. The families will have to find out sooner or later, so maybe it is best to get married as fast as you can in this situation. I think when you know it’s right, you know it’s right, but they really should wait just a little longer. This is what the Friar is saying. He is a little skeptical about all of this, since Romeo was just in love with Rosaline a few days earlier. The Friar wants to make sure he is serious. He uses imagery again with natural creations on earth, like sweet honey, or fire. I think these two speeches are made to balance eachother out, which brings in the theme of duality yet again. I am excited to keep reading and see how this story plays out.

  20. Romeo’s speech paraphrased:

    Amen, Amen. Any misfortunes come forward,
    They cannot stop the exchange of joy
    That just one minute of looking at her gives me.
    Join our hands with holy words,
    Then love-conquering death can do what he wants,
    For it is enough to be able to call her mine.

    Friar Lawrence’s speech paraphrased:

    These short-lived delights have sudden endings
    And at their best they die, like fire and gunpowder,
    Which, as they kiss, explodes. The sweetest thing
    Is hating of its own sweetness
    And in the taste of it destroys the appetite.
    Therefore love slowly and carefully. Love lasts the longest if you do so.
    Too quickly arrives as poorly as too slow.

    Romeo’s speech is about how willing and ready he is to be married, while the Friar’s is telling him to move slowly and carefully so as to not have the love run out quickly and dangerously. Friar Lawrence’s seems to be one giant premonition/warning, as the events we know to happen occur because of their swiftness and impulsiveness. Romeo seems to embody most young lovers, as they are very eager and not very cautious of what may happen. He is openly telling death that he can do what he wants, just because being able to call Juliet his is enough. I can tell you right now that he is really going to regret saying that. Friar Lawrence seems to have a lot of these premonitions/visions, and I wonder if maybe he knows what exactly will happen to Romeo and Juliet? He said at one point that their marriage would bring the two families together, but maybe he really knew that it would be their deaths to bring them together.

  21. True that, true that! But let whatever sadness come
    For it can’t cancel out the traded happiness
    From when I see her for just a minute.
    Please do just join our hands with holy words.
    And let the love ending death do whatever it dares
    Calling her my own is enough for me.
    These violent pleasures only gave violent ends
    And at their strongest, die like fire and powder
    Which, when kissing are ended.
    The sweetest honey Is bitter in its own sweetness.
    And appals any meal with its flavor.
    And therefore love in moderation, and long live so
    For too quickly arrives as late too slowly.
    In both the speeches, the speaker talks about the course of Romeos love. Frair Lawrence appears to be strongly against it in his speech, but Romeo knows dangers even the Frair doesn’t know, and still agrees, because the love he feels, so he thinks, is more than worth dying for.

  22. Romeo:
    Yes, Yes! But whatever bad to come,
    it will not interfere this feeling of joy
    I get when with her.
    When you give your blessing so that I can marry,
    Then let death do his worst
    I will be satisfied to have her as mine

    Friar Lawrence:
    Sudden love has sudden end
    And in their happiness die like fire and powder
    Which as they kiss cause
    The sweetest feelings
    Which is loathsome in its own way
    And the hunger is in the taste
    You love moderately, and then will love long
    For fast love is not good, nor is slow love

    Friar Lawrence in this scene is showing us that it is here where Romeo and Juliet seal their fate. They are making a grave mistake in getting married and it is clear to us, but not them. I recall Ms. Quinson giving us a phrase for when the audience knows what is going to happen but the characters don’t. This play is almost too difficult to read because every step appears to be so beautiful when the mind is clouded with rushed love. However, in reality it is known that this is not only unacceptable, but also will be the very reason of their deaths. I truly wonder what a great difference their lives would be if they both would seek guidance from those that are wiser than them, instead of just rushing to do whatever their emotions want. This is a very important life lesson to learn. Our judgement can be clouded by sparatic emotions that we feel, and it is our job to seek guidance from our elders who have experienced what we are going through today. While situations may be different, outcomes are constantly the same and it is important to listen to advice so that we do not make mistakes like others have made.

  23. When Friar Lawrence wed the unlucky couple, he sealed the fate of their lives with a kiss. He has agreed to help them, even if it costs their reputation of their houses. Friar Lawrence has genuinely good intentions, but doesn’t really understand the importance of this decision. This has changed the plot for the rest of the story.

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