Holy Saint Francis!

Tonight, please paraphrase and then analyze the speech below.  For your analysis, be sure to tell who said the quotation, to whom, and under what circumstances.   Be sure to focus on characterization, plot development, and theme.

As always, be sure to follow the rules of standard written English and don’t forget to respond to the analysis of your classmates as well.

Holy Saint Francis, what a change is here!
Is Rosaline, whom thou didst love so dear,
So soon forsaken? young men’s love then lies
Not truly in their hearts, but in their eyes.
Jesu Maria, what a deal of brine
Hath wash’d thy sallow cheeks for Rosaline!
How much salt water thrown away in waste,
To season love, that of it doth not taste!
The sun not yet thy sighs from heaven clears,
Thy old groans ring yet in my ancient ears;
Lo, here upon thy cheek the stain doth sit
Of an old tear that is not wash’d off yet:
If e’er thou wast thyself and these woes thine,
Thou and these woes were all for Rosaline:
And art thou changed? pronounce this sentence then,
Women may fall, when there’s no strength in men.

R&J blog #9

What man art thou that, thus bescreened in night, / So stumblest on my counsel?

What can you infer about Romeo and Juliet by comparing their use of language  in Act II, scene ii, lines 52-111? Consider their main concerns in this excerpt.  Be sure to use specific textual evidence to support your claim, and further, be sure to make clear how that evidence actually supports that claim.

As always, please be sure to follow the rules of standard in your writing and respond to at least one other comment in this thread.

R&J blog #8

But soft! What light through yonder window breaks?

SCENE II. Capulet’s orchard.


He jests at scars that never felt a wound.

JULIET appears above at a window

But, soft! what light through yonder window breaks?
It is the east, and Juliet is the sun.
Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon,
Who is already sick and pale with grief,                                5
That thou her maid art far more fair than she:
Be not her maid, since she is envious;
Her vestal livery is but sick and green
And none but fools do wear it; cast it off.
It is my lady, O, it is my love!                                                  10
O, that she knew she were!
She speaks yet she says nothing: what of that?
Her eye discourses; I will answer it.
I am too bold, ‘tis not to me she speaks:                               15
Two of the fairest stars in all the heaven,
Having some business, do entreat her eyes
To twinkle in their spheres till they return.
What if her eyes were there, they in her head?
The brightness of her cheek would shame those stars,    20
As daylight doth a lamp; her eyes in heaven
Would through the airy region stream so bright
That birds would sing and think it were not night.
See, how she leans her cheek upon her hand!
O, that I were a glove upon that hand,                                 25
That I might touch that cheek!

Ay me!

She speaks:
O, speak again, bright angel! for thou art
As glorious to this night, being o’er my head                     30
As is a winged messenger of heaven
Unto the white-upturned wondering eyes
Of mortals that fall back to gaze on him
When he bestrides the lazy-pacing clouds
And sails upon the bosom of the air.                                   35

O Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou Romeo?
Deny thy father and refuse thy name;
Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love,
And I’ll no longer be a Capulet.

[Aside] Shall I hear more, or shall I speak at this?           40

Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
What’s Montague? it is nor hand, nor foot,
Nor arm, nor face, nor any other part
Belonging to a man. O, be some other name!                    45
What’s in a name? that which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet;
So Romeo would, were he not Romeo call’d,
Retain that dear perfection which he owes
Without that title. Romeo, doff thy name,                         50
And for that name which is no part of thee
Take all myself.

Choose a specific sentence (so this might be more than a line) from both Romeo and Juliet in the lines above that demonstrates an image, and idea or an emotion that Shakespeare is crafting in this scene. Explain what the image, idea, or emotion is and how sentence you chose does demonstrates that image, idea, or emotion.

As always, be sure to follow the rules of standard written English and respond to at least one other comment in this thread.

R&J blog 7

It is arguable that in Juliet, Shakespeare created a new model for the romantic heroine, courageous and resourceful, someone whose personality would be at home in the 21st century.

Tonight please read “Juliet Trumps Laura,” which is attached to our class homework calendar, if you lost the one I gave out in class.  Then, consider that article, our class activity, and most importantly the text itself to respond to the following question:

What can you learn about Romeo and Juliet from what they say and do and the way that they react and respond to each other. What does this repartee between Romeo and Juliet demonstrate about each of their characters and about their future relationship? Remember to use evidence from the text to support your answer.

This is a deceptively complicated question, so take time to consider the question, the sonnet, and the article “Juliet Trumps Laura” carefully.

R&J blog #6

My only love sprung from my only hate!

Tonight you have a choice!  You must paraphrase and analyze one of the short speeches below AND comment on your classmates responses to the other speech, the one you did not choose.  After you paraphrase your chosen passage, analyze it carefully.  Please follow the SOAPSTone model, where you discuss the speaker, the occasion, the audience (to whom the lines are spoken, not the audience of the play), the purpose, and the tone.   Be sure also to think about characterization, plot development, and theme.   In addition, you must comment on one of your classmates’ analyses of the other short speech.  Naturally, you are welcome to comment as well on the analyses of the speech you chose for your response.


If I profane with my unworthiest hand

This holy shrine, the gentle sin is this:

My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand

To smooth that rough touch with a kiss.


Go ask his name – if he is married,

My grave is like to be my wedding bed…..

My only love sprung from my only hate!

Too early seen unknown, and is known too late!

Prodigious birth of love it is to me

That I must love a loathed enemy.

R&J blog #5

“If love be rough with you, be rough with love.”

Tonight, you should read Act I, scene iv: the Montague boys are out on the town about to go crash Capulet’s party.

After you read the whole scene, carefully paraphrase lines 16-28 here.    A paraphrase is a translation into your own words of the poem or speech.   A paraphrase is NOT a summary.  You should think of it as a word for word translation.  That said, you may use some of the same words, just so long as it would be completely clear to a person reading your translation today.  I know that paraphrasing is hard, and I know the temptation will be to find one online.  Please avoid this temptation!   Do your own best with the information you get on the verso.  Remember, the idea is to learn from the experience, not necessarily to get it perfectly right the first time.

After you write the paraphrase, write a response.  Mercutio here is giving Romeo advice about his love life.  What is the gist of this advice?  How is it similar to or different from Benvolio’s advice to Romeo?  What does this advice tell us about Mercutio?

As always, please check your writing for spelling, punctuation, and grammar.  Please also respond to at least one other comment in this thread.

R&J blog #4

Here’s much to do with hate, but more with love.

Romeo and Benvolio

Tonight, please finish reading Act I, scene i, (pp.17-25).  Then write a response here.  Consider the following question:

What do you think we are supposed to learn about the character of Romeo based on his conversation with Benvolio? Consider his speech, lines Act I, scene i, lines 181-185:

Love is a smoke made with the fume of sighs;

Being purged, a fire sparkling in lovers’ eyes;

Being vexed, a sea nourished with loving tears.

What is it else? A madness most discreet,

A choking gall, and a preserving sweet.

Be sure to use many text-based details in your response and to respond to at least one other comment in this thread.

R&J blog #3

Throw your mistempered weapons to the ground, / And hear the sentence of your movèd prince.

Tonight you should read the first four pages of Act I, scene i, of Romeo and Juliet,  (lines 1- 105).  Please be sure to check out the verso (the left side of the page) for the summary of the scene and extra information about specific words, as you read.  Also, be sure to ANNOTATE, but keep it useful for you as we discussed in class.   Be sure to note special parts of the text that you found interesting, unusual, or surprising;  please also keep a list of questions you would like to bring up with the class.

Then, write your response here.   For the response you MAY want to consider the following questions:

  • How does the fight start?  develop?  conclude?
  • What does this tell us about the overall conflict?
  • How does this part of scene i establish the setting for the play?
  • What predictions or theories do you have based on the events so far?
  • How was reading the play different from the movie version we saw together?
  • How did seeing the movie version first change your understanding of the text?
R&J blog #2