“It’s me wot done it!”

Please respond to the great event of Chapter 39.  Some questions to consider:

  • How is this revelation the turning point of Pip’s life?
  • What is Pip’s reaction to this revelation in regard to himself? In regard to Estella?  In regard to Joe?
  • Predict what further changes may occur in Pip’s life and in his character as a result of this revelation.

As always, be sure to include many specific details in your response to support your opinions.  Also, be sure to respond to at least one other comment in this thread.

GE blog #14

47 thoughts on ““It’s me wot done it!”

  1. In chapters 38 through 39, we find out that Pip’s benefactor was not Mrs. Havisham, but was the convict from the beginning of the novel. This is revealed in chapter 39, when the convict somehow finds out Pip’s address and comes to his room in Barnard’s inn. Pip instantly notices him when he (the convict) comes into the room. Needless to say, Pip is seriously surprised that it is his convict. “I could not recal a single feature, but I knew him!…I could not have known my convict more distinctly than I knew him now…no need to take a file from his pocket..”(pp. 316). Pip still remembers his convict, although it has been a heck lot of time from his young childhood years. It is evident that Pip is really uncomfortable with the convict in his room, and wants him to leave as soon as possible. Still, the convict keeps talking, and somehow seems to know about Mr. Jaggers and Wemmick. “ Concerning a guardian…some lawyer, maybe…and might be Jaggers…why, Wemmick?”(pp. 319). Pip now is freaked out and stunned, until the convict says that it was him who was the benefactor. The convict reports that he has been working very hard, just for Pip. “ Sure as I ever earned a guinea,…that should go to you…and got rich, you should get rich”( pp. 319). This is very generous of him. He has also risked his life coming over. This revelation will impact Pip because it shows that even if you do something very small for a person, ( Pip gave the convict food), they will be very grateful for you. Pip will live in terror now, protecting the convict. I predict he will get caught.

    • great response! I like how you stated your ideas clearly, and I like that you have a prediction! great job! keep it up!

  2. At the end of the second stage of Pip’s great expectation, it is let known to him that his great benefactor was his convict all along. This revelation was yet another turning point in his life. He had asked Mr. Jaggers many times, eager to find out who it is, thinking that it might be someone great and respectable. Pip is extremely shocked and disgusted that he was the one who did all of this for him. “The abhorrence in which I held the man, the dread I had of him, the repugnance with which I shrank from him, could not have been exceeded if he had been some terrible beast.” After Pip finds this out, he finally registers how destroyed his life has become. He becomes miserable once again, and starts to think of the important parts of his life as all a sham. He thinks that Miss Havisham’s intentions were untrue, that the Estella which he had pursued for so long was not his, and that she never had a heart for him. But most importantly of all, he realizes that he had deserted Joe. Joe had loved him no matter what, and been his friend in bad times, but Pip had just left him. He had not even visited him when he came back to his town. Pip feels immense guilt and regret, but still he cannot take anything back. “Miss Havisham’s intentions toward me, all a mere dream; Estella not designed for me.. But, sharpest and deepest pain of all.. That I had deserted Joe.” I predict that now he has come into this revelation, Pip might try to change himself. He might try to become a better person, and learn from his mistakes. “No wisdom on earth could have given me the comfort that I should have derived from their simplicity and fidelity; but I could never, never, never, undo what I had done.”

    • I completely agree with your response and your explanations were very easy to understand. I feel bad for Pip, all his dreams got crushed.

    • I agree with you and feel sort of bad for Pip. You had a great response and great evidence to back it up. I also feel that your analysis of Pip and Joe’s relationship was spot on, and I also hope Pip matures like you said.

    • It feels bad thinking about both Joe and Pip at this point in the novel. Pip’s dreams have been crushed and Joe is alone in the house, it really is a sad thing to think about.

  3. In chapter 39, we find out that Pip’s first convict is Pip’s secret benefactor. Pip had always thought that his benefactor was Miss Havisham, but now Pip finds out that it is his convict. The convict feels like a father to Pip, after “Mini-Pip” had given him food and a file during the first chapter of Great Expectations. Because the convict can never become a gentleman, he wanted to give Pip a chance to become a gentleman instead. Even when he was lonely, and herding sheep, he would think of Pip, and Pip would be his light and his reason for living. “‘Look’ee here, Pip. I’m your second father. You’re my son- more to me nor any son. I’ve put away money, only for you to spend… but wot, if I gets liberty and money, I’ll make the by a gentleman! And I done it. Why, look at you, dear boy!’” (page 230). When Pip finds out that his benefactor is his convict, he realizes that Estella maybe isn’t destined to be with him. Pip had always thought Miss Havisham was his benefactor, and believed that Estella was for him. However, after these shocking news, his dreams of marrying Estella are impossible ones. “Miss Havisham’s intentions toward me, all a mere dream; Estella not designed for me; I only suffered in Satis House as a convenience…I sat thinking, and hanged at the Old Bailey door, that I deserted Joe” (page 323). Pip starts to feel guilty for coming to London and leaving Joe, especially because Mrs. Joe died, and because he had deserted him only for a false dream.

    • Great job! I like how you put in that Pip’s dream was false. It really shows how let down Pip feels now knowing that the convict planned everything for him. Keep up the good work! 🙂

    • In chapters 38-39, Pip finds out that the convict that he gave the file to was his benefactor. This shocks and frustrates Pip. He feels that his life is like Estella’s. She has almost no control over what happens to her, and Pip had no control over what happened to him. It was the convict that had him sent to London, and the convict that probably had him sent to play at Miss Havisham’s. Pip didn’t really have a choice but to obey. All that has happened to Pip was because of the convict. Pip can’t stop thinking that it is the convict’s fault for separating him and Joe. “Miss Havisham’s intentions towards me, all a mere dream; Estella not designed for me; I only suffered in the Satis house as a convenience… But, sharpest and deepest pain of all – it was for the convict, guilty of I knew not what crimes, and liable to be taken out of those rooms where I sat thinking, and hanged at the Old Baily door, that I had deserted Joe.(323) If before Pip felt guilty, now he feels ten times that guilt. He abandoned Joe and went off to chase a dream that hadn’t been real. Pip feels very ashamed that he did such a stupid and unforgivable thing. Pip might try to leave London and go back to his home town and try to apologize to Joe and Biddy for what he did. He will try to repair his relationships with everyone he left at home.

  4. In chapter 39 Pip learns it was his convict who made him a gentleman. The convict, not Miss Havisham, is Pip’s secret benefactor. Pip is not meant to marry Estella at all. Pips whole future seems to be wrecked. “Miss Havisham’s intentions towards me, all a mere dream; Estella not designed for me; I only suffered in Satis House as a convenience, a sting for the greedy relations, a model with a mechanical heart to practise on when no other practise was at hand; those were the first smarts I had. ( page 323)” Pip realizes that he spent all that time at the Satis House for essentially nothing. He will not marry Estella. Pip was used. Perhaps this is the way Estella would break Pip’s heart that Miss Havisham was talking about.Pip also learns something about how he feels for Joe. “But, sharpest and deepest pain of all – it was for the convict, guilty of I knew not what crimes, and liable to be taken out of those rooms where I sat thinking, and hanged at the Old Bailey door, that I had deserted Joe. (Page 323)” Pip relojes that he needs Joe. He no longer has Estella or Miss Havisham, they just use him. Also Pip hears that the convict is even now on the run from the law, and that if he is caught, he could be put to death. Pip realizes it is his duty to help his benefactor. He feeds him and gives him Herbert’s bed for the night while Herbert is away. Pip learns a lot about himself and other characters meaning to him in this chapter.

  5. I, for one, am completely mind blown at this revelation. I feel similar to Pip after putting his benefactor to sleep! I had never, in my wildest imagination, have though it at all even likely that the convict indeed was Pip’s benefactor. I had to sit own and think this over for 5 minutes after. In this contemplation, I have my answers to the given questions. This revelation is the greatest turning point of Pip’s life in the sense that Pip might now have different motivations in his pursuit of his life’s great expectations. He now knows that his connection with Miss Havisham and great admiration and intense desire of Estella is merely a convenient side detail in his life. He might have difficulty accepting the reality of his riches. If he does ultimately accept it, he will do all what is in his power to help the old man to repay him for what he had done, and the fact that he had risked it all to come back to London to visit what he had created. If Pip denies it, there could be great tensions between Pip and the convict and great regret and grief in the old man himself. It could lead to anger, which in turn could lead to a retaliation of the old man, judging by his wretched form, the abuse he had undergone to give Pip this wealth, and the fact that he does not likely have much else besides Pip. As to Pip’s reaction to the matter, it is rather detailed. Regarding Estella, Pip is mortified at this revelation. He had always had a strong conviction that Estella was designed for him, and that Miss Havisham had indeed been his great benefactor. This shows that that is false and that it is a mere coincidence that he had a connection with Estella and Miss Havisham. I think that Pip honestly should feel a hundred times better, though. It shows that the revelation Estella gives at the end of chapter 38, saying that she did not want to trap and shame and break his heart out of all the others, is truly and originally her own idea, and not a command given by Miss Havisham to plan out how Pip was to come together with Estella. Regarding, Joe, however, we do not have much to go on. Pip makes a brief statement that he would still not have returned to Joe at that moment, but ultimately feels that he would have been better off, if only his convict had left him alone on that faithful day.

    • I know, I also feel so relaxed now that I know Pip’s benifactor! Great writing, I love how easily your writing flows.

  6. In chapter 39 there was an astonishing twist that Pip’s convict was really his second father/ benefactor. As this, was not only a surprise to the reader but it is also surprising to Pip. This revelation is a turning point in Pip’s life because Pip finally realized that his benefactor didn’t have to be in such a high social class but instead in a lower class then Pip’s family was. This makes Pip feel ashamed because he was so persistent that his benefactor was Miss. Havisham. In regard to Estella Pip feels as if “Estella not designed for me” (p 323) and that they only were meant to be friends. As for Joe, Pip feels guilty and that his mistakes could never be maken up for. With this, there are many possibilities for Pip’s future, one of which might be Pip being nicer to Biddy and Joe. He might do this out of guilt and as a way to say sorry and make up for all those years that he treated them like nothing. Along with this there is a possibility that Pip will break up with Estella and fall into the arms of Joe and Biddy for comfort. Pip might be depressed if he breaks up with Estella being that it just isn’t meant to be and when he is depressed he might rely on Joe and Biddy because they are his “family” and shouldn’t be treated horribly. Saying that this might happen isn’t always enough so we will just have to keep reading! To conclude, Pip being told this jaw dropping surprise changed everything from relationships to future predictions.

    • Great Job, Noy! Your response was very thoughtful and concise.
      You easily got your points across and had an interesting input. Great! Keep up the great work.

  7. With the conclusion of the second stage of Pip’s great expectations, we finally learn who Pip’s benefactor is. This revelation was a turning point in Pip’s life. Pip’s benefactor is none other than his convicts from several years earlier, whom he had helped on the marshes. Pip’s mystery that he had for many years had finally been solved, and all the years. All the times that Mr. Jaggers had curved Pip with his questions about the benefactor are all over now. It all began when Pip heard a strange noise walking up to his room. The strange man walked into his room and was an old sailor. Pip treats him nervously and haughtily before recognizing him. “I could not recall a single feature, but I knew him!…I could not have known my convict more distinctly than I knew him now…no need to take a file from his pocket..”(pg. 316) After the convict explains that he is Pip’s benefactor, Pip is none other that flabbergasted at this situation. Pip soon learns the convicts whole story and how he gained his wealth. It turns out that the convict went to Australia, where he worked in sheep ranching and earned a huge fortune. He was moved by Pip’s kindness to him on the marsh, that he arranged to use his wealth to make Pip a gentleman. Pip understood that this meant that he was not destined to Estella. Pip was very bummed at the moment, but realized that he has a benefactor to take care of. Since the convicts was still wanted and could be put to death Pip closes the curtains and allows the convict to sleep in Herbert’s bed. After the convicts went out the sleep, Pip locked his door in fear. Furthermore, Pip’s feelings towards Estella and Joe have changed. Pip knows that Estella doesn’t like him the way he does, and that he isn’t destined for her. I think Pip will no longer love Estella the way he previously did. He also began to feel very guilty in regards to Joe. He had not visited Joe, one of his best friends, at all since returning like he said he would do. He felt as if he left Joe and couldn’t do anything to make it better. The text states, ““Miss Havisham’s intentions toward me, all a mere dream; Estella not designed for me.. But, sharpest and deepest pain of all.. That I had deserted Joe.”(pg.323) This sums up Pip’s thoughts about Joe and Estella after learning about his benefactor. I think that the convict will be put to death, and Pip no longer has a desire to be a gentleman. I predict that Pip will leave the money and be common again with Joe and Biddy, while also cutting ties with Miss Havisham and Estella. In addition, I strongly contemplate that Miss Havisham’s revenge plan won’t work.

    • Ajay, I like how many interesting adjectives you used to really describe what happened in the chapter, and how you tied everything together with Pip’s new expectations. One thing, however, I don’t think it was Australia that the convict went to, but America, because that’s what they referred to as the “new world.” Great response overall!

  8. In chapters 38-39, Pip finds out that the convict that he gave the file to was his benefactor. This shocks and frustrates Pip. He feels that his life is like Estella’s. She has almost no control over what happens to her, and Pip had no control over what happened to him. It was the convict that had him sent to London, and the convict that probably had him sent to play at Miss Havisham’s. Pip didn’t really have a choice but to obey. All that has happened to Pip was because of the convict. Pip can’t stop thinking that it is the convict’s fault for separating him and Joe. “Miss Havisham’s intentions towards me, all a mere dream; Estella not designed for me; I only suffered in the Satis house as a convenience… But, sharpest and deepest pain of all – it was for the convict, guilty of I knew not what crimes, and liable to be taken out of those rooms where I sat thinking, and hanged at the Old Baily door, that I had deserted Joe.”(323) If before Pip felt guilty, now he feels ten times as guilty. He abandoned Joe and went off to chase a dream that hadn’t been real. Pip feels very ashamed that he did such a stupid and unforgivable thing. Pip might try to leave London and go back to his home town and try to apologize to Joe and Biddy for what he did. He will try to repair his relationships with everyone he left at home.

    • Amazing job Arina. I never looked at how Pip and Estella’s problems could be linked to the fact they have little control over their lives. Pip always tries to live up to certain expectations, but he doesn’t have much control, which can leave him frustrated. Great response.

  9. Wow! Pip’s benefactor is revealed to be the convict he helped so long ago on the marsh. Pip is speechless and nearly faints. Instead of showing any appreciation for all the convict had done for him, he treats him with abhorrence and repugnance which “could not have been exceeded if he had been some terrible beast.” (page 320). He is completely shocked and knows that this news disrupts his life as he knew it and thought it would be. Pip is now tormented because his beliefs of Miss Havisham intending Estella to be for him melted away and were “all a mere dream” (page 323). (While I feel sorry for Pip, Herbert did try to warn him of this possibility, but Pip would not hear of it.) He now knows that he was only brought to Satis House to be a pawn in Miss Havisham’s sick game and will never have Estella. Furthermore, Pip is full of guilt when he realizes he abandoned Joe and Biddy to pursue his “great expectations” at the hand of a convict. He is certain there is nothing he could ever do to “undo” what he had done to his dear friends Joe and Biddy. I would like to see Pip return home to Joe and Biddy and live happily ever after. However, at the close of chapter 39 when “the wind and rain intensified, the thick black darkness” (page 324), I sensed more trouble lies ahead for Pip.

  10. In chapter 39, Pip finds out that the convict from that day at the marshes was the person who had helped him to become a gentleman. This is shocking and world-changing news to Pip, and is the turning point of Pip’s life, as this revelation changes a lot of the ways Pip had been thinking about his relationships with other individuals. When the convict walks into Pip’s household, Pip immediately recognizes him as his convict from all of those years ago. “I relinquished the intention he had detected, for I knew him! I could not recall a single feature, but I knew him!”(Pg. 314). The convict then goes on to explain his whole story, and his reasons for using the money that he earned to help Pip become a gentleman. Now, many of Pip’s thoughts on his companions and the people in his life have changed. He finally realizes that he and Estella are not actually meant to be with each other, and the fact that he had treated Joe wrongly really settled in. “Miss Havisham’s intentions towards me, all a mere dream; Estella not designed for me; I only suffered in Satis House as a convenience, a sting for the greedy relations, a model with a mechanical heart to practise on when no other practise was at hand; those were the first smarts I had.”(Pg. 323). Many of Pip’s assumptions and thoughts are proved wrong in this discovery, and Pip will now probably try to mend some relationships in the future, such as the ones with Joe and Biddy.

    • William, you explained what happened in chapter 39 flawlessly. However, I think that your prediction about Pip getting back together with Biddy and Joe will not happen. Pip says that “I would not have gone back to Joe now, I would not have gone to Biddy now…” (Pg. 323). Other than that, great job.

  11. Tonight’s reading has blown me away! We find out that Pip’s convict was truly was the benefactor that helped Pip to become a gentleman. Now Pip knows who his hidden benefactor is, and he now has a lesson in what it’s like to be grateful. His convict told him, “I lived rough, that you should live smooth; I worked hard, that you should be above work.” (page 319) So we find out that the convict was so grateful for Pip’s act of generosity in his donation of food and the file, that the convict has worked hard so that Pip can be rich and have an easy life. this makes Pip think of Joe and Biddy, and how he feels so perplexed as to how it wasn’t Miss Havisham that paid for him to become a gentleman. “Miss Havisham’s intentions toward me, all a mere dream; Estella was not designed for me…” and, “No wisdom on Earth could have given me the comfort that should have derived from their simplicity and fidelity; but I could never, never, never, undo what I had done.” (page 323) So Pip obviously knows where he stands with his family, because he feels that it would be inappropriate to try to visit or get in touch with them. And he realizes how he should’ve been more grateful toward them. But I do hope the he tries to mend he relationship with them. He must now decide what he shall do with the knowledge of who is benefactor is, and how he will change himself for the better, to become a true gentleman.

  12. Well I am still mind blown by these chapters. All this time, Pip knew for sure that Miss Havisham was his benefactor. To be honest, so did I. Who would have thought that the convict that young pip helped would be his benefactor. The convict tells his story as a changed man and how he wanted to make Pip a gentlemen because he couldn’t be one. After he is given this information, his mindset on everything changes. This is a major turning point in the novel and in Pip’s life. He comes to the realization that he was brought into Miss Havisham’s home to be a puppet in her little game of revenge. Pip now knows that his love for Estella can never be fulfilled. It was all a lie. They were never meant to be together. He regrets his decision of ever becoming a gentlemen. He regrets his decision of losing touch with his life long friends, Biddy and Joe. As much as I want Pip to return back home, I think that Pip is going to be in huge trouble. On page 324, it says, “… the candles were wasted out, the fire was dead, and the wind and rain intensified the thick black darkness.” You can only predict what will happen in the coming chapters.

    • I absolutely LOVE your response Anjali, you said everything I wanted to better than I could and even things I didn’t notice. The quote you used really gave me kind of an “ooooohhhh” moment if you know what I mean. Great job!

  13. Throughout the novel, we all assumed, and that includes Pip, that the mysterious benefactor must be Miss Havisham. Well, in chapter 39 it is revealed that the benefactor is actually Pip’s convict from when Pip was a very little boy. On pg 316, the convict says, “You acted noble, my boy…Noble Pip! And I have never forgot it!”. Pip responded with, “If you are grateful for what I did when I was a little child, I hope you have shown your gratitude for mending your way of life…” Pip wants the convict to be a better person, but soon he later finds out that the convict had really done him a huge favor. But Pip was not happy with the news. “Oh no, no, no, never never!…”(pg. 321) Pip was disgusted at the fact he never was really a gentleman, that a convict had made him this way all along. Pip truly feels he has made such a mistake in leaving Joe, and feels he will never have Estella. This really broke Pip because the most important things that had been in his life for the past few years, Estella and being a gentleman suddenly don’t matter anymore. I predict Pip will have to make some serious changes in his life now,hopefully going back to Joe and Biddy. At this point, it is hard to predict what Pip will do.

  14. In chapter 39 it’s revealed that Pips convict from when he was a young boy, has been his benefactor the entire time. The convict had been saving every pound or guinea he received to give to Pip. In the text, the convict says that, “I swore afterwards, sure as ever I spec’lated and got rich, you should get rich. I lived rough, that you should live smooth; I worked hard, that you should be above work.” The convict has risked his safety and worked so hard for so many years, just to repay Pip for giving him a file and some mincemeat when he was seven years old. This one small kind deed Pip did as a kid, has shaped his entire life. He won’t ever have to work again and is rich, because of one small thing. Everything really happens for a reason. This rocked Pips world, he was shocked and in disbelief. He could barely process what he was hearing. Not only that, but this has changed his outlook on his entire life. Pip has realized he doesn’t really own anything to Miss Havisham, and she isn’t really this guardian angel to him. Pip is beginning to realize he was never as important as he thought he was. He thought he was being groomed for Estella, when he was really just another kid. I feel Pip feels foolish for thinking he was so important to Miss Havisham, that she’d become his benefactor. When in reality, that was not the case at all. In regards to Biddy and Joe, Pip feels worthless to them. This man who is essentially a stranger to Pip, has worked so hard to give Pip that life he has now, but no else Pip holds to a high standard in his life has done anything close to that. A stranger wants to provide for Pip everything he can, whereas no one else in Pips life did. He’s treated Biddy and Joe like garbage to try to impress thes rich people who he thought were really important in his life, when in reality it was a convict enabling him to live the life of a rich man. I think it’s interesting how Pips singular good deed has ensured him a fantastic life of luxury. One charitable act really goes a long way, which you also see in A Christmas Carol how Scrooge doing some good deeds saved Tiny Tim’s life. Pips one good deed is saving him from the life of being common he has come to detest.

  15. Chapter 39 reveals to us who has been Pip’s benefactor, and I don’t think of us could have imagined it being who it is. During the storm, Pip hears footsteps on the stairwell. He thinks it’s the ghost of his dead sister, but we know that really isn’t. A stranger is there, and the stranger is ecstatic when he meets Pip. Pip doesn’t recognize the man at first, but he realizes that it is in fact his very own convict.(Yes, from the first chapter) We learn that he has been Pip’s benefactor this whole time, not Miss Havisham, who we thought it was this whole time. Of course, Pip rejects the convict quickly and wishes him well, but has no interest in being friendly with him. “Stay!’ said I. ‘Keep off! If you are grateful to me for what I did when I was a little child, I hope you have shown your gratitude by mending your way of life. If you have come here to thank me, it was not necessary.”(pg.316) Come on Pip! Your entire upcoming as a gentleman is from a man you have barely known, and you push him away because of how he used to be, years ago? How about thanking him for making you the man you are now, instead of assuming he would thank you for the little bit of food you gave him. Clearly, Pip isn’t thinking straight. He does apologize when he sees that he had made his convict cry, and at least he did that. However, the way Pip feels after making the mental connections! It pains me to have him feel almost like his life was a lie, but I sadly feel like he deserves it. He treats people so poorly after gaining power that he has yet to earn. He realizes that him and Estella were never meant to be married, and that him trying to marry Estella really was him trying to do something that was never going to happen. “Miss Havisham’s intentions toward me; all a mere dream; Estella not designed for me.”(pg.323) The reality of the situation is changing him entirely. Also, think about poor Joe! “But, sharpest and deepest pain of all – it was for the convict guilty of I knew not what crimes, and liable to be taken out of those rooms where i sat thinking, and hanged at the Old Bailey door, that I deserted Joe.” Oh, poor Joe! It hurts to think about how much pain he has gone through in this whole book. His “child” leaves him behind to become something better, and feels bad about his father’s position. His wife passes away after getting attacked. He’s alone in the once lively house where there was Mrs. Joe yelling at Pip for being home late.

  16. In Chapter 39, Pip had gone through the turning point in his life, for he had met his benefactor, the convict. We and Pip assumed that Miss Havisham was the benefactor, since she knew Mr. Jaggers, and was possibly setting him up to be have his heart broken by Estella. Learning that the convict had set Pip up to become a gentleman was shocking, for he would be the last person you would expect. Despite that, it seems to make sense that the convict was the benefactor. He probably had Mr. Jaggers defending his trial, showing connections with him, and it always seemed odd for Dickens to put the convicts in the story if it had no greater meaning to his great expectations. From learning this amount of information, he started feeling a huge amount of pain from guilt and shame, like we discussed on the blog yesterday. Although he wanted to go back to his family, he knows he can’t, because nothing can fix the wounds that he created, and he knew that he could never undo what he had already done. He thinks that Estella wasn’t made for him, and suffering at the Satis house was a mere convenience. He felt miserable, thinking of when he had deserted Joe. Possibly, now he will turn his life around, to a better future where less people are hurt.

    • I like what you wrote, I also like the possible ways the convict got in touch with Mr Jaggers and how you inferred the convict would have a larger role.

  17. After reading chapters 38-39 we find out who Pip’s benefactor is. In a surprising twist we come to realise that Pip’s benefactor is his convict. On page 319 Pip’s convict says,”Yes, Pip, dear boy, I have made a gentleman on you! It’s me wot has done it! I swore that time, sure as ever I earned guinea, that guinea should go to you.” This knowledge imparts a huge change upon Pip. Pip, in an instant, goes from being relatively happy with his fortune to being extremely shamed. “But, sharpest and deepest pain of all – it was for the convict, guilty of I knew not what crimes, and liable to be taken out of those rooms where I sat thinking, and hanged at the Old Bailey door, that I had deserted Joe (Page 323).” When Pip chose to become a gentleman and leave Joe he made a choice. It is now when he realises what his choice truly means that he realizes what he has done to Joe. When he now knows that his benefactor is not Miss Havisham another person he thinks about is Estella. If Miss Havisham and Estella aren’t related to him becoming a gentleman what does this say about his relationship with Estella. “Miss Havisham’s intention’s toward me, all a mere dream: (however worst) Estella not designed for me (Page 323).” Pip’s love isn’t actually his. With all this new information Pip actually is taken from from his relatively safe position and now, ”All the truth of my position came flashing on me: and its disappointments, dangers,disgraces, consequences of all kind, rushed in in such a multitude that I was borne down by them and had to struggle for every breath I drew ( Page 319).” Pip has been chucked into this huge mess and now it is up to him to get out of it and undo his mistakes of his past.

  18. In these last two chapters of Volume 2, what Pip calls the turning point of his life is a huge surprise for the reader. It turns out that the “mysterious benefactor” of Pip’s fortune is not actually Miss Havisham like everyone, Pip included, expected. It turned out to be his convict, the one that he helped by giving him food after being threatened by him when he was just a little 7-year-old. This changes Pip’s perspective on nearly everything. First off, he realizes that he and Estella are not meant to be. “Miss Havisham’s intentions for me, all a mere dream; Estella not designed for me; I only suffered in Satis House as a convenience, a sting for the greedy relations, a model with a mechanical heart to practice on when no other practice was at hand; those were the first smarts I had,” (323). When Pip thought Miss Havisham was the benefactor, he felt that she had plans for Estella and him. However, upon learning that his convict was his benefactor, this dream was crushed. He realizes that his visits to the Satis house did him no such good in winning Estella’s heart, or even coming into the property itself. After his thoughts about Estella, his mind went to Joe and Biddy. He deserted them for a dream that wouldn’t come true. “But, the sharpest and deepest pain of all … was that I had deserted Joe. I would not have gone back to Joe now, I would not have gone back to Biddy now, for my own consideration; simply, I suppose, because my own sense of worthless conduct to them was greater than every consideration,” (323). At first, he left them thinking that it would help him win over Estella, but again, no such luck. Now he doesn’t want to go back to Joe and Biddy, since before he had told Biddy he would visit often, but now it’s been three years. I find it interesting how even his guiltiness about Joe relates back to Estella, and also how the very first thing he thinks of is Estella, not Joe. To summarize, in chapters 38 and 39, Pip has reached the turning point in his life, and this makes him rethink many of the decisions and conclusions that he has come to.

    • I like how you included how Pip was “crushed” by his idea that him and Estella were meant to be. Will this help Pip change his mind about Biddy.

  19. In chapter 39 we discover that Miss. Havisham was not Pip’s benefactor, it was the convict from the beginning of the novel. My first question was “why?”, but after thinking back to what Pip did to deserve this honor, I realized it. The reason that Pip’s convict did this for him was that he helped him significantly when he was trying to survive. At the time, Pip just thought that he was saving himself, but really he changed another man’s life. This brings me back to when as a child my parents would say to be nice to everyone and help others. Since Pip used these childhood ‘rules’ his life was completely changed, for the better. Since this book is described as a “coming of age novel” and I am “coming of age”, throughout this book I have been using Pip’s experiences as lessons for my own life, and this chapter will definitely be one that I remember, and implement into my daily life. The point that I’m trying to make is that although this is an astonishing revelation in the plot, it is also something that we should think about in our own lives. Pip didn’t even know how much giving the convict food and a file would change the convict’s life, but he did it anyway and he was rewarded for it.

  20. In chapters 38 and 39, Pip learns that his convict is his secret benefactor. When he first realizes his convict, Pip treats him like he is above him and that they should not be near each other. “But our ways are different ways, none the less.” (Pg. 317). Pip says that he is a gentleman and the convict is a criminal and not as high in the social class so they should not be seen together. Not only does he treat him as an outsider, he is rude to him as well even after Pip finds out that his convict is the secret benefactor. “The abhorrence in which I held the man, the dread I had of him, the repugnance with which I shrank from him, could not have been exceeded if he had been some terrible beast.” (Pg. 320). Pip treats the convict with disgust and hatred because he finds out that the convict is the benefactor. Pip thinks of the convict as a monster. If Pip wanted to know who the benefactor was, why did he not like who his benefactor was? This climax has affected Pip’s view of Estella and Joe as well. Finally, Pip realizes that Estella is not meant to be with him. “Miss Havisham’s intentions towards me, all a mere dream; Estella not designed for me; I only suffered in Satis House as a convenience, a sting for the greedy relations, a model with a mechanical heart to practise on when no other practise was at hand; those were the first smarts I had.”(Pg. 323). Not only did his thoughts about Estella’s relationship change, he realized that treating Joe unfairly was his biggest mistake. “But the sharpest and deepest pain of all… that I deserted Joe.” (Pg. 323). After Pip becomes a gentleman, he starts to act differently because he is a gentleman. He is in love with a girl who will never love him and ruins his relationship with the people that care about him. In Pip’s future, he will most like remember the values of being “common” again and might even find out if there are any relationships between Miss Havisham and the convict. The revelation makes Pip act like how he used to act: innocent, caring and “common”.

  21. In chapter 39, we found out who Pip’s benefactor is and it ends up having been Pip’s convict the whole time. Pip’s convict showed up at Pip’s home and scared Pip because he didn’t know who it was. He let him inside cautiously and they talked while the convict told Pip everything. Pip’s convict said that he always wanted to thank Pip greatly for what he had done as a young boy, so making Pip a gentleman was his way of doing it. The convict coming over to Pip’s apartment and telling him the answer to almost every question Pip’s had of his young adult life, was a huge turning point. Pip had spent his whole time in London, not knowing who sent him there and not knowing that he was being rewarded for being what was seen as a noble act by the convict from when Pip was young. Now, the convict shows up out of the blue, on no specifically special occasion and tells Pip everything. For a while, Pip assumed his benefactor was Miss Havisham, as I’m sure many of us did, but little did he know that he was very wrong. Finding out that Miss Havisham wasn’t his benefactor made Pip upset because he wasn’t as closely tied with them as he thought. It seemed to really make him feel disconnected with them, Estella specifically. On page 321, the convict is talking to Pip and he says, “ … Never a soul in it but my own self and Mr. Jaggers.” after he says this, Pip immediately asks if anyone else was involved and the convict says no, possibly hoping to hear that Miss Havisham was apart of it. When the convict answers no, Pip seems let down. I think this is a sign that Pip wanted Miss Havisham to be involved because if she was, then he felt he had a chance with Estella and getting to be around them. But if she wasn’t the benefactor then maybe he has no chance with being apart of their lives, especially Estella’s. After such a long time of thinking that Miss Havisham was behind him being a gentleman and his whole life in London, it was shocking to him for it to not be here doing. Pip seems as though he is so taken aback by all of this that he doesn’t know what to ask or do with himself now. While we read into volume 3, we’ll get to see how this will affect Pip’s relationships with people he used to be close with.

  22. In chapter 39 we finally meet Pip’s helper (I can’t think of a better word currently). This helper is by far no Miss Havisham, for it is not even a woman. Out of all the people who could do it, and there aren’t many but this is still valid. Out of all the people who could be supporting Pip, it’s Pip’s convict! “No need to take a file from his pocket and show it to me…Yes, Pip, dear boy, I’ve made a gentleman of you!!” (pg. 316 & 319). The convict is still feeling like he is in debt to Pip, so he decided to get out and work hard. And that the money he makes will go to Mr. Jaggers, so that Pip won’t have to work. The convict worked as, “…a sheep-farmer, stock-breeder, other trades besides,awy in the new world,” (pg. 317). Pip is not only surprised that Miss Havisham wasn’t his supporter, but also sad that it was not Miss Havisham. For now that he knows that Miss Havisham was not his supporter, he sees that he and Estella are not meant to be. “Miss Havisham’s intentions towards me, all a mere dream; Estella not designed for me; I only suffered in Satis House as a convenience, a sting for the greedy relations, a model with a mechanical heart to practise on when no other practice was at hand; those were the first smarts I had. But, sharpest and deepest pain of all,–it was for the convict, guilty of I knew not what crimes, and liable to be taken out of those rooms where I sat thinking, and hanged at the Old Bailey door, that I had deserted Joe.” (pg. 323). The whole time after we had met Estella, I had wanted Pip to see that he was not meant for her, and she was not meant for him. And now finally he sees it, but I can’t help from feeling bad for Pip. For his dreams for half his life, were just all proven false, and unavailable. But Pip isn’t just sad about his dreams being crushed, he is also sad about Joe. As seen in the quote above, Pip is a bit angry that he had let Joe, and everything else behind for a man that he was scared of, and dreaded. He didn’t even know the man well, and now he has left his life behind because of this man, I would probably feel a bit angry/disappointed/sad about this too, if it had happened to me.

  23. In chapter 39 dickens reveals a shocking twist in the life of Pip. We discover that Pip’s benefactor was actually his convict all along.Pip did not ever consider this at all to be the case. He couldn’t even comprehend the fact that the convict caused him to be a gentleman. Pips utter shock can be seen throughout as the convict tells his story. Apparently the convict made a fresh start in North America and became a rich farmer through hard work. He worked for just enough money to pay for Pip to become a gentleman. The thought of him having made a gentleman kept him going and made the former convict successful. Pip still can’t understand that Miss Havisham and Estella aren’t part of this plan at all. Then however he realized that Miss Havisham and Estella never intended on Pip to become a gentleman, he was just a boy miss Havisham used Estella to practice on so she could know how to break hearts. Miss Havisham never had a great scheme for Pip. Now Estella may have a liking for Pip because the reason she never has shown any emotion towards Pip is to protect his heart and not entrap him. As she said earlier in the book she warned Pip. She did not warn Drummle or any other boy who followed her. Pip realizes this and doesn’t know how to feel, but Pip has bigger problems. He feels people are going to come after him now. This all will definitely affect Pip by making him more paranoid and making his views change for Miss Havisham and Estella. In conclusion volume 2 of this novel ended with a huge cliffhanger

  24. Chapter 39 holds a very surprising turn of events, that surely changes Pip’s expectations as time goes on. This new information is that the mysterious benefactor of Pip’s is none other than his convict, from the marshes all those years ago. Pip is astounded when he finds out, because everything he thought was true about Miss Havisham and Estella isn’t actually correct. It all started when Pip heard someone coming up the stairs to his room. When he investigated and saw who it was, he didn’t recognize the man at first. The man appeared to know and admire Pip, who soon realized that the man was his convict. “Even yet, I could not recal a single feature, but I knew him! … I could not have known my convict more distinctly than I knew him now…” (pg. 315-316) The convict revealed himself to be the one of Pip’s making, the benefactor, and Pip can’t believe it. He tells Pip that he promised himself to make Pip a gentleman, because of what he did to help him so long ago. He sees that he has succeeded in doing so, because of all the nice things Pip has, and how he acts so gentleman-like. This is all a major turning point in Pip’s life, because everything he thought he knew wasn’t true. He always believed that Miss Havisham was his benefactor, and that Estella was being “saved” for him. “I only suffered in Satis House as a convenience, a sting for the greedy relations, a model with a mechanical heart to practise on when no other practice was at hand.” (pg. 323) Pip now sees that he also abandoned Joe back home, for something that was never actually true. He feels guilty for what he’s done, and realizes that he can’t go back and fix his mistakes, all because of the convict. I predict that Pip will be angry for a while, at the convict and at the world, for lying to him, but then he will start to change his ways. I think that when he gets the courage to do so, he’ll go back to the marshes and make up with Joe and Biddy. He’ll realize that Estella just isn’t worth all of this heartbreak, especially because it’ll never happen, at least not happily.

  25. In chapters 38-39 we learn things. We learn about Pip’s convict being his benefactor. Pip’s made up world of him being chosen by Estella, had come crashing down. He regrets turning his back on Joe because of a made up dream. This also means that little things go a long way. Pip giving his convict some food and a file, made the convict work the rest of his life to make sure Pip is brought wealthy, and “above Work.” This shows how one kind thing can change the rest of your life. I think Pip owes the convict. I think Pip will try to protect the convict because Pip owes the convict his luxurious life. Pip will probably try to protect him from the people after the convict. Over all I think these chapters we’re really big ones in the book,and change the plot of the story.

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