Miserably I went to bed after all, and miserably thought of Estella, and miserably dreamed that my expectations were all cancelled, and that I had to give my hand in marriage to Herbert’s Clara, or play Hamlet to Miss Havisham’s Ghost, before twenty thousand people, without knowing twenty words of it.

Tonight, I would like you to respond to Chapters 30-33 in any way you choose. These chapters seem fairly varied to me, full of interesting details that may lead you to new questions or understandings about the themes and motifs presented in Great Expectations. You may choose a close reading of one small passage or scene, or you may choose to address the larger thematic questions touched upon in these chapters.  Also, I’m thinking that we can use your responses to focus our discussion in class.

As always, be sure to use specific details from the text in your response and be sure to comment on at least one other comment in this thread.

GE blog #12

It was but a day gone, and Joe had brought the tears into my eyes; they had soon dried, God forgive me! soon dried.

In chapters 27, 28, and 29 Pip comes into contact again with various people from home.  Discuss how his relationships with these characters have evolved since he came to London and how this evolution contributes to the reader’s understanding of Pip’s development.  Use many specific details from the text to support your opinions.  Be sure, also, that you comment on at least one other comment in this thread.

GE blog #11

“Well,” said Wemmick, “he’ll give you wine, and good wine. I’ll give you punch, and not bad punch….”

Read chapters 23-26 (or chaps 4-7 of Volume II) of Great Expectations.  Then, compare and contrast Pip’s experiences at Mr. and Mrs. Pocket’s, Mr. Wemmick’s and Mr. Jaggers’ homes.  How do these experiences contribute to Pip’s education in the ways of the world?

Be sure to use specific details from the text to support your opinions.

Be sure also that you respond to at least one other comment in this thread.

Don’t forget that you need to follow the rules of standard written English in all your writing for English class, even your short comments on the Great Expectations blog!

GE blog #10

We Britons had at that time particularly settled that it was treasonable to doubt our having and our being the best of everything: otherwise, while I was scared by the immensity of London, I think I might have had some faint doubts whether it was not rather ugly, crooked, narrow, and dirty.

Read chapters 20-22 (ch. 1, 2, and 3 of Volume II) of Great Expectations and then compare Pip’s experience so far in London with his expectations of it.  What message might Dickens be trying to convey to the reader thereby?  Be sure to use specific details from the text to support your opinions.  Don’t forget that you need to follow the rules of standard written English in all your writing for English class, even your short comments on the Great Expectations blog!

Be sure also that you respond to at least one other comment in this thread.

Also, as you read, look for and mark with a sticky note any passages you think are discussion-worthy!

GE blog #9

And the mists had all solemnly risen now and the world lay all before me.

For this assignment, the world lies all before you, too!  Please discuss the first stage of Pip’s great expectations here.  Some questions to consider are:

  • What questions would you like to discuss with the class?
  • What themes (as in overarching messages or ideas) do you see evolving in this novel?
  • What passages strike you as worthy of greater analysis?
  • Which characters intrigue you?

You may choose a close reading of one small passage or scene, or you may choose to address the larger thematic questions touched upon in chapters 1-19.  Also, I’m thinking that we can use your responses to focus our discussion in class.

As always, be sure to use specific details from the text in your response and be sure to comment on at least one other comment in this thread.

GE blog #8

“I am instructed to communicate to him,” said Mr. Jaggers, throwing his finger at me sideways, “that he will come into a handsome property. Further it is the desire of the present possessor of that property that he be immediately removed from his present sphere of life and from this place, and be brought up as a gentleman–in a word, as a young fellow of great expectations.”

Please read chapters 18 and 19 and annotate!

After you finish your reading, please discuss the above revelation.  You may want to consider how the great expectations affect Pip, even before he starts for London, and how they affect other characters.  What do these reactions to the news teach us about these characters?

Please be as specific as possible and be sure to use evidence directly from the text to support your ideas.  Think about Jaggers!  He would never assert anything without evidence.

Be sure to follow the rules of standard written English and to include many specific text-based details in your response.  Also, don’t forget to respond to at least one other comment in this thread.

GE blog #7

“Do you want to be a gentleman, to spite her or to gain her over?”

Our classroom discussion was so interesting and productive today, let’s continue it on line!  After you  read chapters 15-17, respond to any plot developments, characterizations, themes, literary elements or other ideas here.  One idea might be to look for other images that seem to recur in the text, but there are many other ideas as well.  I look forward to seeing how your thoughts develop over the course of the evening.

As always, please proofread your writing carefully for grammar, spelling, and punctuation and remember to reply to at least one other comment in this thread.

GE Blog #6

It is a most miserable thing to feel ashamed of home.

Discuss the above statement which begins chapter 14.  Please consider its relevance not only to chapters 12-14, but also to the chapters that preceded it, and the plot developments that may follow.

Please, as always, be careful of spelling, punctuation, etc.  Remember, this is still an academic exchange, and while we want to express ourselves freely, we always do so in standard English!  Also, as always, be sure to respond to other comments in this thread as the discussion evolves over the course of the evening.

GE blog #5

He stirred his rum and water pointedly at me, and he tasted his rum and water pointedly at me. And he stirred it and he tasted it; not with a spoon that was brought to him, but with a file.

Tonight please read chapters 10-11 and then respond to any plot developments, characterizations, themes, literary elements or other ideas here.

As always, please proofread your writing carefully for grammar, spelling, and punctuation and remember to reply to at least one other comment in this thread.

GE blog #4

That was a memorable day to me, for it made great changes in me.

Please read chapters 7, 8 and 9 of Great Expectations tonight, then respond to the prompt below:

Discuss Pip’s day at Miss Havisham’s residence, Satis House.  Whom does he meet?  What does he do there?  Consider the quotation above.  What great changes does Pip’s day at Miss Havisham’s house make in him?  Predict how this is likely to change him and the course of the novel.

As always, please reply to at least one other comment in this thread.

GE blog #3