May 30 2017

If we shadows have offended…

If we shadows have offended,
Think but this, and all is mended,
That you have but slumber’d here
While these visions did appear.
And this weak and idle theme,
No more yielding but a dream,
Gentles, do not reprehend:
if you pardon, we will mend:
And, as I am an honest Puck,
If we have unearned luck
Now to ‘scape the serpent’s tongue,
We will make amends ere long;
Else the Puck a liar call;
So, good night unto you all.
Give me your hands, if we be friends,
And Robin shall restore amends.

First, paraphrase Puck’s final speech. Second, analyze: So!  Now! Who is really dreaming? What is Shakespeare saying about theater, reality, magic, dreaming….  Make sure you include many text-based details and that you respond to at least one other comment in this thread.

MND #6


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Posted May 30, 2017 by equinson in category Midsummer Night's Dream

29 thoughts on “If we shadows have offended…

  1. Toa Neil

    If we shadows have offended,
    Think but this, and all is mended,
    That you have but slumber’d here
    While these visions did appear.
    And this weak and idle theme,
    No more yielding but a dream,
    Gentles, do not reprehend:
    if you pardon, we will mend:
    And, as I am an honest Puck,
    If we have unearned luck
    Now to ‘scape the serpent’s tongue,
    We will make amends ere long;
    Else the Puck a liar call;
    So, good night unto you all.
    Give me your hands, if we be friends,
    And Robin shall restore amends.

    This is saying sorry for his actions in the play.
    Also It seems to say that we are the one’s that are dreaming. We are in a theater which is a dream.

    Reply
  2. ilyssal

    If the shadows have offended,
    Think about this, and all is fixed
    That you have but slept here
    While these dreams did appear.
    And this weak and idle theme,
    No more yielding but a dream,
    I am an honest Puck,
    Now to avoid the audience’s hissing
    We will make amends here now
    Else the Puck a liar call;
    So, good night to you all
    Give me your hands, if we be friends,
    And Robin shall restore peace.

    Puck’s closing lines in the play were his way of breaking the fourth wall of the stage to tell the audience it was all a dream. He is apologizing for the traffic of our stage and explaining that we were witnesses of a midsummer nights’ dream.

    Reply
  3. arihantp1

    If we shadows have offended anyone
    Think about it like this, and all is fixed
    That you have slept here
    Even though these visions did appear
    And you did see the terrible themes
    It is all nothing more than a dream
    People, do not be mad
    If you pardon me I will mend everything
    And I am the honest Puck
    If I receive the luck that I do not deserve
    In order to escape the serpent’s tongue
    We will fix everything
    Otherwise you can call Puck the liar
    So goodnight all
    If any of you can call me a friends I will promise
    That Robin will amend everything

    Puck is addressing the viewers and readers of the play in this speech of his. He tells us that he is sorry for those who did not enjoy this confusing play, and is sorry if he offended us. He then promises that if we forgive him he will fix everything, in which those who did not enjoy the play should just imagine it as a dream. Shakespeare is trying to tell us how plays and writing are just from one man’s imagination. We should not take any of it literally.

    Reply
  4. sofiad1

    If we shadows have offended,
    Think only this, and everything is fixed,
    That you have but slept here
    While these dreams did appear.
    And this weak and idle theme,
    Is nothing but a dream,
    Gentles, do not reprehend:
    if you leave, we will mend:
    And, as I am an honest Puck,
    If we have lost our luck
    Now to escape the serpent’s tongue,
    We will make amends here and now;
    Else Puck is a liar;
    So, good night unto you all.
    Give me your hands, if we are friends,
    And Robin shall restore amends.

    This Robin saying it was the audience who was dreaming. He is saying that he will fix all that has happened. He said that the only way to do that, though, is for the audience to believe that they were asleep. Now, this may very well be a dream, what with all the crazy shenanigans that went on, but the audience knows that isn’t true. And yet, Puck tells us we are.

    Reply
  5. tarika1

    If the shadows have offended you,
    Don’t think of this, and all is right,
    That you have not slept here
    While these dreams did appear.
    And this weak and idle play,
    Is no more than a dream,
    People, do not reprehend:
    if you pardon, we will forgive:
    And, as I am an honest person,
    If we have unearned luck
    Now to hiss,
    We will make long emends;
    Or else the Puck a liar call;
    Good Night to everyone.
    Give me your hands, if we are friends,
    And I shall restore amends.

    In this speech, Puck makes several interesting points. He says that the audience is dreaming in the play. This is an interesting because Puck is breaking the fourth wall, which did not ever happen in the play before. Shakespeare might be saying true love is a dream, with the examples of the characters Lysander, Demetrius, Helena, and Hermia.

    Reply
  6. caias1

    If we shadows have offended anyone,
    Think of it like this-
    You were dreaming the whole time.
    Please do not get upset with me.
    If you forgive me, then we will fix everything.
    Since I am an honest Puck,
    We will make it up to you,
    If you do not hiss at us.
    So, goodnight.
    Applaud me, if we are friends,
    And Robin will make everything up to you.

    In Robin’s closing lines, he apologizes to the audience for the play. He says that if we did not like it, we should believe that we were dreaming the whole time. Robin promises to fix the play if the audience imagines that they were sleeping. For all the magic and love problems in this play, the audience could have actually been dreaming.

    Reply
  7. christophert3

    If we illusions have offended
    Think this, and all is forgiven,
    That you have slept here
    While you saw these things.
    And this trivial thing that we speak of,
    No more important than a dream,
    Gentle people, do not be angry:
    If you pardon, we will improve:
    And, as I am an honest Puck,
    If we have luck we do not deserve,
    Now to escape the hisses,
    We will make amends here;
    Else you call me a liar;
    So, good night to you all.
    Applaud, if we’re friends,
    And Robin will fulfill his promises.

    I believe that in Puck’s speech, the reader or, since this is a play, the audience is the one dreaming. I believe that all magic and theatrical stunts are really dreams, figments of the imagination. None of this could pertain to reality. When he was saying his speech to Hippolyta, Theseus talked of how emotions, such as fear and joy, could lead to one seeing things. But the things are not really there but results of the way you feel and so you see them in such a way. This is what Shakespeare is saying is how we see all those tricks and magic. But in reality, they’re not really happening.

    Reply
    1. christophert3

      I must also say that it was awkward of Puck to describe himself as an “honest Puck”. It’s an oxymoron since a Puck is a mischievous spirit and Puck is describing himself as mischievous and honest.

      Reply
      1. francescaa

        I agree. For Puck to call himself honest makes absolutely no sense. I think he is trying to sell the idea of this play being a dream, and he boosts his credibility by saying he is “honest”.

        Reply
  8. charlottes

    “If these shadows have offended
    Think of this, when all has been fixed
    That you have gone to sleep here
    While these sites appear
    And this fragile and unproductive theme
    No more yielding, but it is a dream
    Gentles, do not understand
    If you pardon us, we will fix
    And, as I am an honest Puck
    If we have lost luck
    Now try to escape the serpent’s tongue
    We will make apologies fairly long
    Or else Puck will be called a liar
    So goodnight to all of you
    Give me applause, if we are friends
    And Puck shall fix problems.”

    These last few words from Puck is him talking to the audience about this was all just a dream, but the important thing is Puck is breaking the fourth wall. He is telling the audience it was dream and apologizing for his actions throughout the play. The real question is: Who’s dream? I think it is Puck’s dream, because he is the one who explains what is really happening. How else would Puck know it was a dream if it wasn’t his? This is also a logical answer because everyone else in the play wouldn’t dare break the fourth wall – someone was bound to do it, and Puck did.

    Reply
  9. avae1

    If we shadows have offended you,
    Think just this and all will be fixed:
    That you have slept here,
    While this play was performed.
    And the weak and insignificant themes,
    Are of no more than a dream,
    Gentles, do not disapprove.
    If you forgive, we will repair.
    And, as I am an honest Puck.
    If we have undeserved luck
    Now to escape the hiss of the audience,
    We will make amends before long.
    Or else Puck is called a liar.
    So good night to you all.
    Give me your applause, if we be friends,
    And Robin shall restore amends.

    In his final speech, Puck speaks directly to the audience and asks them to forgive him for his mistakes. By doing this, he breaks the fourth wall in theatre and leaves the setting Athens to visit wherever the audience of the play may be. Puck is best known for his silly actions that cause trouble and confusion, but here he asks for forgiveness, and to make up for his actions he offers to take the trouble of the stage away from the audience members. For those who disliked the performance, Puck convinces them to imagine the wild occurrences as all just a dream. Shakespeare once again acknowledges the power of imagination. In the final speech it is made evident that with imagination anything is possible. One can watch an entire play and by the conclusion believe it was all just a dream. As long as one believes it, there can be no distinction between reality and imagination. In theatre especially, imagination is a significant factor in creating a performance. If a poet, director, or even actor has no creativity, that makes for a pretty boring play. Shakespeare also creates a relationship between the audience and the actors. In this play the bond between them seems personal, as it appears Puck truly knows the audience, and therefore Shakespeare does as well.

    Reply
  10. maddy

    If we actors have caused you to take offense,
    Regard it as follows and all will be fine,
    Your minds were dormant,
    While viewing these figments.
    And this foolish and feeble tale,
    Was no more existent than a dream,
    Audience, do not become upset due to my words
    If you accept this apology, we will repair matters:
    I am a truthful Puck,
    And I swear that if we are fortunate enough
    To not receive contempt from the audience,
    We will make amends shortly;
    If this be false, then I declare myself a liar;
    So goodnight to you all.
    Applaud us, if we are friends,
    And Robin will fulfill all of his wrongdoings by you.

    Robin’s concluding speech depicts that the play is merely being dreamed of by the audience — hence the title, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”. This is said as an effort to coax reluctant viewers into enjoying the play. It is said that the play is as fictional as a dream, so it should not be taken to heart. A message behind this speech is that not everything is as it seems to be. Sometimes, it is best to not take an occurrence too seriously at first, for it may not be as truthful as it appears.

    Reply
  11. francescaa

    If we shadows have offended,
    Think about this, everything is okay now
    That all this time you have been sleeping here
    Where all these dreams appeared
    This weak and boring play
    Is no more than a dream
    Gents, please don’t be angry at me
    If you pardon me, we will mend
    And, I, honest Puck
    If we have no luck
    Will now escape the hissing of the audience
    We will make up for what we have done
    Or else Puck is a liar
    So good night to you al
    Please give me your trust, and we will be friends
    And “naughty Robin” will fix everything

    From Puck’s speech, the reader comes to the understanding that he is “breaking the fourth wall” and talking to the audience. I think what Shakespeare is saying in this speech is that dreaming is very complicated. Perhaps Shakespeare is implying that there is a fine line between imagination and reality. The complexity of an audience witnessing a play, then being told it was all a dream really makes my brain hurt. It is clear that Shakespeare is referring to a bigger, more sophisticated idea in this speech, and when we figure it out what this idea is, it will be revolutionary.

    Reply
  12. faithw

    If we performers have offended you
    Think about this, and everything will be okay
    You were sleeping while you saw these visions
    And this frivolous story was just as fake as a dream
    Don’t be mad at me
    If you forgive, we will fix everything
    And, as I am an honest Puck,
    If we are lucky enough to escape hissing, we will make it right soon
    Otherwise, call me a liar
    So, goodnight everyone
    Applaud for me if we are friends
    And Robin will make it all up to you

    I find it appropriate that Puck is the one who ends the play, as he is mischievous and enjoys conducting pranks. He promises that if the theater-goers have been entertained and have not booed or hissed the actors, the performers will make it up to them by improving. He hopes the audience applauds. However, he says that if the audience was offended by the play, then they should consider that they imagined the whole thing. Puck raises the possibility that the whole play has been nothing but a dream, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”.

    Reply
  13. willowm

    If we illusions have offended you,
    Then think about this and all will be fixed,
    You have been sleeping here
    While these dreams appeared.
    And this weak and trivial theme,
    Has been nothing more than a dream,
    Gentle people do not rebuke:
    If you pardon, we will improve:
    And, as I am an honest Puck,
    If we have not earned luck,
    Now to escape the audience’s hisses,
    We will make amends.
    Otherwise call me a liar.
    So goodnight.
    Or applaud if we be friends,
    And Robin shall restore amends.

    In Robin’s speech he breaks the fourth wall and speaks directly to the audience. He apologizes for possibly offending the reader. He then tells the reader that if they have been offended, they should think of this as a dream. This means that the entire play is the audience’s dream, a Midsummer Night’s Dream. Shakespeare is comparing reality with imagination by showing that the play can be interpreted either way. Of course love potions may not be real, but it can also be viewed as a symbol of young love and how quickly it can change, or how it seems love puts a spell on people.

    Reply
  14. alexo

    IF we fairies have offended,
    Think this, and all will be fixed
    That you have only slept here,
    While you saw these visions.
    And this weak theme,
    Giving no more than a dream,
    Gentles, do not reprimand.
    If you pardon, we will fix:
    And, as I am an honest Puck,
    If we have undeserved luck
    To escape the crowd’s disapproval.
    We will make amends and fix the problem:
    Or else Puck can be called a liar;
    So, good night to you all.
    If you are my friends, give me your hands,
    And Robin shall make amends.

    Robin very clearly and purposely breaks the fourth wall in this final speech. He asks the audience to forgive him for his mistakes throughout the play, causing trouble, making lovers fight each other, and all other sorts of mischief. It establishes a different sort of Puck, a character change right at the end of the play. Before, we only knew Puck for the mischief, for the fun, for the messing around. But at the end of this play, Puck is very serious and apologetic about the actions he has done and seems to want to take full responsibility for his actions. This is a rather odd character change, as it does not advance or change the plot in any way, as it’s literally at the end of the play.

    Reply
  15. briannag3

    If we have offended you,
    Think about this and everything is fixed,
    You were asleep here
    When you saw this play.
    And this play was a dream,
    Please, don’t be upset
    We will make it right:
    Because I am an honest Puck,
    Now we will stop the hisses
    And make amends;
    Or call me a liar;
    So goodnight.
    So applaud if you enjoyed
    And I shall make amends.

    In Robin’s speech he is talking directly to the audience which is called “breaking the fourth wall”. He is ensuring that the audience has thoroughly enjoyed the play and will applaud instead of “hiss”. He is implying that the entire play the audience was asleep and this was all a dream.

    Reply
  16. Kat

    I hope that we have not offended people,
    If you think this way it will be alright,
    While you slept nearby.
    This silly story,
    it is seen as docile dream,
    Gentle people are likely to find fault:
    if you let us fix the mistakes we made:
    I may be a trickster but I am honest,
    We have been very lucky throughout this tale,
    if we don’t fix what we’ve done you can me a liar;
    Good night friends,
    and I now you will leave.

    In this last speech of the play we see Puck telling us that this play was us witnessing a dream. He ends the play as if he was telling it all along. This made me think that Shakespeare was calling himself a trickster. However he is also apologizing for what he did and showing that Puck wasn’t really trying to hurt anyone. Shakespeare’s writing seems to have a lot of times when he pokes fun at himself. For example when the mechanicals are performing their play it seems like Romeo and Juliet. Shakespeare seems as if he is making fun of his past play. To me it also seemed that during the mechanicals play was directed or narrated by Theseus, Demetrius, Lysander, and Hippolyta. This made is seem like he was saying the actors were not in control of what they were doing.

    Reply
  17. alekhya

    If we, the fairies, have offended you,
    Think about it this way and all will be mended,
    Here in the theater you have fallen asleep,
    and these sights were but visions
    of little meaning.
    Please do not reprimand us,
    for this is nothing more than a dream.
    If you accept this apology, everything will be mended
    And, as I am the honest Puck,
    will say that we have great luck
    that we have been saved from the reprimanding of the audience
    and we will make amends;
    Or else let Puck be called a liar;
    So, good night to you all.
    If we are friends give me your hands,
    and I, Robin, shall make amends.

    In this speech, Robin Good-fellow breaks the fourth wall of the theater by addressing the audience when he asks them to pardon the actors for any offense that may have been done. Here Shakespeare explains to us why his play is call “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” as this whole story is nothing but a creation of a bored mind at midsummer. When he says this last speech Shakespeare is basically telling the audience that when he created the characters he was not trying to insult anyone though we know very well that he was indeed poking fun at the ideals and views of the time.

    Reply
  18. laurena2

    If these shadows have been offensive,
    Think about this, all is fixed,
    That you have slept here
    While these visions appeared.
    And this weak, overall theme,
    No more than a dream,
    Gentle people, please do not reprehend:
    If you excuse me, we will fix:
    And, as I am an honest man,
    If we have undeserved luck
    Now to avoid hissing,
    We will make orderly changes;
    Otherwise, you can consider Puck to be the liar;
    So goodnight to all.
    Give me your hands, if we are friends,
    And Robin will fix everything.

    In Puck’s final speech, he completely changed the course of the play in sixteen short lines. He says that all of the actions in the play never really happened and the audience was dreaming the entire time. Puck not only explains the play and how the audience was dreaming, but he also “breaks the fourth wall” and talks directly to the audience. This makes Puck’s final speech seem even more important, which also engages the audience more in the plot twist of the story.

    Reply
  19. cameronl3

    If we shadows have offended,
    Just think this, and everything is fixed,
    That you have but slept here
    While these dreams did appear.
    And this weak and idle theme,
    Is nothing but a dream,
    Gentles, do not reprehend:
    if you leave, we will mend:
    And, as I am an honest Puck,
    If we have lost our luck
    Now to escape the serpent’s tongue,
    We will make amends here and now;
    Or else Puck is a liar;
    So, good night unto you all.
    Give me your hands, if we are friends,
    And Robin shall restore amends.

    In Puck’s final lines, Robin Goodfellow breaks the fourth wall during the play, as he asks the audience to forgive the actors for any controversial remarks or actions that may have been committed. Shakespeare explains that in the making off these characters, he had no plan to offend anyone. Although he does make an “apology,” it is obvious that he was definitely making jokes toward the ideals.

    Reply
  20. marinas1

    If we figures of entertainment have disgruntled you in any way,
    Think about this mere fact and all will be restored to as it was before:
    That you have been asleep here
    While these visions had appeared before you.
    And this delicate and trivial theme,
    Is producing no more than a simple dream,
    You gentlemen and women, do not reprimand these words.
    If you pardon them, all will be right in the world once more.
    And, as I am an honest and virtuous Puck,
    If we have luck
    Now to escape the hisses from the audience
    We will make amends.
    Or else call me a liar.
    So have a good night
    Applaud for us, if we are to be friends,
    And Robin shall make up for all the wrongdoing that you have just experienced.

    As Puck exits the scene, we as readers begin to understand the play on a more serious level. In this monologue, Puck claims that the entire play itself was but a dream. This, frankly, does make some sort of sense. Most of the play itself takes place during the night, when most people are asleep. In a similar way, Titania and Oberon, the king and queen of the fairies, are also king and queen of the night, while Theseus and Hippolyta rule the day. Titania and Oberon, when it comes to the play overall, stir up the most trouble, which subsequently cause fiascoes to ensue overnight. These chaotic happenings (with everyone falling in love with each other and Bottom’s head being replaced with that of a donkey’s) all are a product of the night, as well as being all-too frivolous to have any sort of substance. Thus, the play is taking place in the minds of the dreamers.

    In addition, I felt that Theseus’s speech from the previous blog was also worth mentioning. In this declaration, he says that the poet has such a fabulous imagination, so much so that he can make something foreign into something even more alien, with absolutely no meaning for it. In this way,the entire pla may just be a figment of his imagination, for he is the one creating it. In addition, at the end of Theseus’s monologue, he emphasizes “‘Or in the night, imagining some fear, how easy is a bush supposed a bear!'” This, in itself, shows that the night may be what is causing this strange dream to ensue for the audience.

    Although these may all be resound theories, something in Puck’s monologue confuses these ideas even more. In his speech, he declares “‘so goodnight unto you all’”, insinuating that the play took place during the day. If this is true, how could they have been in a deep slumber? I would have thought that this play took place during the night for them to all have been asleep. Additionally, is the play itself not called “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”? This confounds my mind even more, and I presume that Puck may be correct, and that this was indeed all just one simple dream.

    Reply
  21. ivanl

    If we shadows have offended you,
    Think of this, and all will be fixed
    You have only been asleep
    While these visions did appear
    And this idle and weak theme
    Was merely just a dream
    But do not be mad
    For if you pardon me, I will mend everything
    Or I may be called a liar
    So good night!
    And give me your hand if we are friends
    And I will make amends

    In Puck’s speech, he speaks directly to the audience which is known as “breaking the fourth wall.” He explains here that he has no intention to mean any offense to the reader, and that if he has, they should think of it as a dream. Should they pardon him, he promises to make amends. I like the irony of Puck saying to think of it as a dream, when the name of the play is “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.”

    Reply
  22. margauxc

    If by chance you’ve been offended
    Consider this and you’ll be sorted right,
    These visions which you saw,
    Did appear while you were resting here asleep,
    And this jovial, idle tale,
    Has as much power as a mere dream.
    Do not fret, gents:
    Spare us pardon and we’ll make this right:
    As an honest Puck, I swear,
    If you, the audience, restrain from hissing,
    We will fix this with such haste;
    If not, you may call me a liar;
    So I bid good night to all of you.
    If we’re friends, please give applause,
    And Robin shall mend what’s broken.

    The concluding monologue to Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”, consists of different elements such as magic, theater, reality, and dreaming. In a certain perspective, one could entirely interpret this monologue in a peculiar light- When the four Athenian lovers awoke before Theseus, they recall the events of the past two acts as fragments of a dream. And so, what if, hypothetically, the audience is being placed in the same position as the four lovers; What if, the audience is being urged to recall the night’s events as a dream because if the audience were to accept the events of the play as reality it would compromise the mystical aspect of the play’s supernatural element? Theoretically, one could conclude that the events which were witnessed by the audience were, in fact, real- and that the same “magic” used on the four Athenian lovers that made them remember the previous night as a dream is the same “magic” Robin Goodfellow is using to make the audience believe that the entire experience has been merely a dream?

    Reply
  23. Rebecca F

    If we actors have offended
    Just think this, and all is fixed
    You have only been sleeping
    When these visions appeared.
    And this pathetic and pointless story,
    Amounts to nothing more than a dream,
    Ladies and gentlemen, do not scold:
    if you’ll allow, we’ll fix it:
    And, as I am an honest Puck,
    If we are lucky
    To escape your dissatisfaction,
    We will make amends before long;
    Or call me a liar;
    So, good night to you all.
    If we are friends, give me some applause,
    And Robin shall make things right.

    In Puck’s monologue, he breaks the “fourth wall” by addressing the audience, much like the “Pause you who read this,” passage in Dickens’ Great Expectations. Puck advises the audience to think of the play as a dream if it has offended them. This brings to mind the title of the play itself, A Midsummer Night’s Dream. It also makes me ponder the matter of who is dreaming. Would I, as the reader, be the one dreaming? Or maybe it was a dream of Shakespeare. Shakespeare himself wrote that poets and lovers and madmen all see such vivid, imaginative dreams that reason cannot comprehend. As a poet, Shakespeare would be included among the dreamers. So then was A Midsummer Night’s Dream simply the rambling of a mad poet?

    Reply
  24. eshap

    If we have somehow offended you by our illusion,
    Think about this and everything will be returned to the way it was before:
    That you have been asleep here
    While these visions came forth and filled your mind.
    And this soft and trivial tale,
    Is creating nothing but a dream,
    Gentlemen and women, reproach what I say to you.
    If you excuse what I have told you, the world will go back to how it was.
    And, seeing that I am an honest Puck,
    If we receive any luck,
    Now to be away from hisses from the audience,
    We will shortly begin to make amends.
    Otherwise, call the honest Puck a liar.
    So have a good night.
    Applaud, if we should become friends,
    And Robin will fix the wrongs that had occurred here tonight.

    Puck appears in the play one last time, explaining everything that had occurred in the play. In his soliloquy, Puck explains that the entire play was simply a dream. The entire audience had been dreaming the whole time, watching chaos and confusion take place. Should an audience member have not enjoyed what they had dreamt, honest Puck would make amends to help them forget. None of the dream had actually happened, but who initiated the dream so that everyone had the same dream? Shakespeare. As a playwright and poet, Shakespeare had created events so unrealistic that it could only be a dream. He strategically sets the dream to take place mostly at night, as that is when one is asleep. During these events, Titania and Oberon appear quite often, especially when the time is night, since they rule during the night. Theseus and Hippolyta appear at brief times only when it is daytime.

    As Puck speaks his soliloquy, he completely ignored the “fourth wall” that blocks out the audience. Typically, a character is not supposed to break away from the actions of the play to address the audience, setting up a “fourth wall”. Here, Puck speaks directly to the audience, telling them that the entire play was a dream. If anyone had not enjoyed the sights they saw, it would not be long before they forgot it happened. He tells the audience to give applause, not only for the play, but for him as well, since he is the one who would fix any problems. This is strange because Puck usually is the one who causes mischief, not the one who fixes it. Calling himself an honest Puck also contradicts his usual behavior. He had mentioned before that he enjoyed seeing the lovers in such confusion, which does not lead to calling him “honest”. He takes joy in tricking Lysander and Demetrius. Puck, although full of mischief, calls himself honest for he will mend any problems that arise.

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  25. George

    Puck was always a important part of the story however i did not think he was going to be this important. He did a “pause you who read this” moment. He broke the fourth wall and gave very important plot information.
    I think the wedding at the end was a way for Shakespeare to have everyone in one place because everyone is there, the faries, the humans, and the mechanicals. I also think that the speech was a way for puck to say “duh of course it was fake, did ypu really believe the faries and the magic flowers”. I also think that it was fitting for Puck to say it because he caused so much trouble and now he causes his last bit of trouble by telling the audience that the play was a dream.

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  26. adam

    If we, shadows, have hurt you
    Think of this, and it will be healed
    You have not slept here
    While the shadows appear
    And this idle theme
    No more unusual than a dream
    Soft ones do not understand
    If you excuse, we will forgive
    And, I am an honest person
    If we have bad luck
    We must escape the bothering
    We will compromise
    Or else Puck will be a liaSo enjoy the night
    Give me your trust if you do
    And i shall restore normalcy

    This final speech by Puck is him breaking the 4th wall, and telling the audience the whole story is a dream. Although he apologizes for his wrongdoings, who’s play is this? I think Puck had this dream. He probably dreamt about his confusion in life. Confusion in love and choices. He knew the whole story, it must be his dream. The power of imagination is truly focused on and emphasized throughout the novel and especially here. Imagination is something Shakespeare uses often and tries to pass on as much as he could through his plays.

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  27. Tyler Newby

    If we have offended you,
    think but this, and all is fixed,
    That you have slept here
    While this happened.
    And during this harmless play,
    Being nothing but a dream,
    Gentles, do not misunderstand,
    I you forgive us, we will fix this,
    And, believe me,
    If we somehow manage
    To escape your disapproval,
    We will make this all better;
    Or else I am a liar;
    So, goodnight to you all,
    Give me your hands, if we are friends,
    And I will make amends.

    In this speech, Puck could be talking to the nobles in his audience, or the audience of the entire play “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” If Puck was talking to the nobles in the audience of the small play, he simply wanted to prevent the actors from being executed. The actors had mentioned in Act I Scene ii that if they offended the audience, they would be executed. However, if Puck was talking to the audience of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”, it gives a reason for the title “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”. Perhaps the thought was that the entire play was a dream. Which gives reason for the magic, fairies and potions.

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