May 16 2017

O my love, my wife!

Tonight should finish reading the play!  Then, please paraphrase and analyze Romeo’s soliloquy, Act V, scene iii.    What metaphors, references, and comparisons does he use?  How does this help the reader or audience member understand his anguish?  What insight about life and death is Shakespeare conveying to his audience?

O my love! my wife!
Death, that hath suck’d the honey of thy breath,
Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty:
Thou art not conquer’d; beauty’s ensign yet
Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,
And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.
Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet?
O, what more favour can I do to thee,
Than with that hand that cut thy youth in twain
To sunder his that was thine enemy?
Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,
Why art thou yet so fair? shall I believe
That unsubstantial death is amorous,
And that the lean abhorred monster keeps
Thee here in dark to be his paramour?
For fear of that, I still will stay with thee;
And never from this palace of dim night
Depart again: here, here will I remain
With worms that are thy chamber-maids; O, here
Will I set up my everlasting rest,
And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars
From this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last!
Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O you
The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss
A dateless bargain to engrossing death!
Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide!
Thou desperate pilot, now at once run on
The dashing rocks thy sea-sick weary bark!
Here’s to my love! [Drinks.]  O true apothecary!
Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die.          [Falls.]

R&J blog #16


Copyright © 2016. All rights reserved.

Posted May 16, 2017 by equinson in category Romeo and Juliet

26 thoughts on “O my love, my wife!

  1. Toa Neil

    O my love! my wife!
    Death, that hath suck’d the honey of thy breath,
    Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty:
    Thou art not conquer’d; beauty’s ensign yet
    Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,
    And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.
    Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet?
    O, what more favour can I do to thee,
    Than with that hand that cut thy youth in twain
    To sunder his that was thine enemy?
    Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,
    Why art thou yet so fair? shall I believe
    That unsubstantial death is amorous,
    And that the lean abhorred monster keeps
    Thee here in dark to be his paramour?
    For fear of that, I still will stay with thee;
    And never from this palace of dim night
    Depart again: here, here will I remain
    With worms that are thy chamber-maids; O, here
    Will I set up my everlasting rest,
    And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars
    From this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last!
    Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O you
    The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss
    A dateless bargain to engrossing death!
    Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide!
    Thou desperate pilot, now at once run on
    The dashing rocks thy sea-sick weary bark!
    Here’s to my love! [Drinks.] O true apothecary!
    Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die.

    In this soliloquy he is comparing death to life in that his death will be another wedding. This seems to call back to their wedding all those days ago. I would like to point out that they met, married and died in LESS THAN A WEEK!

    Reply
  2. tarika1

    My love! My wife!
    Death had taken the air out of thy lungs,
    It has no power against your body,
    Tybalt are you there?
    What more can I do for you?,
    Then the hand that cut your life,
    To kill what was your enemy?
    Forgive me, cousin! Ah, Juliet,
    Why are you so beautiful?
    Is death in love with you and will he keep you as his mistress?
    Because of this, I will stay with you,
    And never leave this area.
    I will always stay here,
    You will have the earth as your neighbor; Here
    Will I set up my eternal rest,
    From this world, Eyes, take your last glimpse!
    Arms, take your last hold! And lips,
    Be sealed with a kiss.
    Making a deal with the devil for my life!
    Here’s to my love! [Drinks.] O true apothecary!
    These drugs are quick. And with a kiss I die.

    In this scene, Romeo personifies death and his body parts. He says death is taking in Juliet and is in love with her. Also, when he is about to commit suicide, he says,
    “From this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last!
    Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O you
    The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss
    A dateless bargain to engrossing death!”.
    This personification explains what he is about to do, he acts as if the body parts will hear him saying this. He knows they won’t but he is announcing his death to the world.

    Reply
  3. arihantp1

    Oh my love! My wife!
    Death has sucked all the sweetness in your breath
    But it hasn’t done anything to your beauty
    Your beauty has not been conquered yet
    Crimson is still in your lips and cheeks
    Death’s grasp has not making you pale
    Tybalt are you still there, covered in a blanket of blood
    O what a favor I did for you
    But forgive me cousin
    Oh Juliet, why are you still so beautiful
    Is death in love with you?
    What kind of a monster
    Keeps you here
    I will stay with you t prevent death from getting you
    And I will never leave
    Here I will rest for eternity
    Eyes look around for the last time
    Arms embrace for the last time
    The doors of death, seal with a last kiss
    A bargain for my life will be made
    Here’s to my love
    The drug is fast, and with a kiss I die

    Romeo imagines death as a person. Romeo is mad at death for stealing his wife, and claiming her as it’s own wife. From this we can clearly tell that Romeo is depressed. His true love has died, he has been exiled, and know he is responsible for two deaths. Romeo does not know how to deal with such sorrow, so he hastily kill himself as a solution. Romeo and Juliet is truly tragedy and this clearly shows it.

    Reply
  4. faithw

    Oh my love, my wife.
    Though death has sucked the life out of your death, it could never steal your beauty.
    You haven’t been conquered.
    Your lips and cheeks are still red.
    Death has not made you pale yet.
    Tybalt, do you lie in your bloody sheets?
    What more favor can I do for you
    Than to kill the man who ended your life?
    Forgive me cousin, – Ah, dear Juliet,
    Why are you still so alluring?
    Should I believe that death loves you,
    And that the loathed monster keeps you here to be his significant other?
    For fear that this horrid idea is true, I will stay here with you.
    I will never depart from this tomb.
    With worms that are the chambers maids. Oh, here
    Will I rest forever.
    And be rid of the unfavorable events that haunt me.
    Eyes take your last look
    Arms take your last embrace. And lastly lips, take your last precious kiss.
    Come bitter poison, come, unpleasant guide.
    Desperate pilot, steer your ship into the rocks.
    Here’s to my love!
    Apothecary, you told the truth, the poison works quickly.
    And with one final kiss, I die.

    Shakespeare’s use of dramatic irony is evident in Romeo’s final speech. The audience is aware that Juliet is only asleep, not dead. This information is not known by Romeo, who believes Juliet passed away and speaks his last words to her. Because he can’t imagine a world without Juliet, Romeo decides to end his life, so he can be reunited with his love.

    Reply
  5. maddy

    Oh, my love! My wife!
    Death has deprived your breath of its sweetness,
    Yet it leaves your allure untouched:
    You have not been vanquished;
    Hints of crimson remain within your lips and cheeks,
    And death has not turned them pallid.
    Tybalt, do you repose yonder in your bloody shroud of death?
    Oh, what better favor could I deliver,
    Than to kill the man who has taken your life,
    With the very hand that caused your early demise?
    Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dearest Juliet,
    Why do you remain so beautiful? Am I to believe
    That death is enamored by you,
    And that the horrid monster imprisons you
    As his mistress?
    I am fearful of that, so I will join you;
    And I will never depart from this tomb: here, here I will remain
    With worms that are your chamber-maids; Oh, here
    I will eternally lie,
    And I will be rid of all my woes. Eyes, reconnoiter once more!
    Arms, make your last embrace! And, lips, you are
    The doors of breath. Seal with a righteous kiss
    The eternal pact death and I have made!
    Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavory guide!
    You desperate pilot, let us steer
    This sea-wary ship right into the rocks!
    Here is to my love! [Drinks.] Oh, the apothecary was truthful!
    His drugs do take quick effect. So I die with a kiss. [Falls.]

    Within this final soliloquy of Romeo’s, I found the following lines particularly interesting:

    “…shall I believe
    That unsubstantial death is amorous,
    And that the lean abhorred monster keeps
    Thee here in dark to be his paramour?”

    Romeo is referencing Juliet’s death by mentioning the concept of love. One may interpret that within these lines, he is admitting his love for Juliet to be the cause of her assumed death. Initially, Romeo was a temptation for Juliet. It is evident that this temptation quickly developed into love as the tragedy progressed; as Juliet drew increasingly closer to her demise. When Romeo wondered if death bounded Juliet through the rhetoric of love, he was truly questioning whether Juliet had ended her life due to him and their unfortunate love.

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  6. caias1

    Oh, my wife, my love!
    Death has taken your sweet breath, but has not taken away your beauty.
    He has not conquered you; you still have some color in your face.
    Tybalt, is that you in the bloody burial shroud?
    What better way to get even than to slay the man who murdered you?
    Oh, I am sorry cousin.
    Juliet, how are you still so beautiful?
    Is it possible that death has fallen for you- keeps you hear to be his?
    I hate the idea, so I will stay by your side.
    I will never leave this place; I will rest here forever with you.
    I will forget all the bad luck that I have had.
    My eyes will take their last sight, my arms their last embrace.
    And my lips will take one last kiss.
    Come bitter poison, desperate pilot, let us crash this ship into the shore.
    Oh, that apothecary man was honest! The drugs are already working.
    And now, I will die by my love.

    In Romeo’s speech, we see his pure grief for Juliet’s “death.” Even though he admits that the tomb is scary, he will not leave her side for Death to claim. He compares his grief and suicide to a desperate pilot crashing his ship into the rocks of he shore. He uses this metaphor because, like the captain, he is bringing his depression over Juliet to an end. Romeo also personifies Death as a person who is coming to take Juliet for himself. Death is, in a way, a version of the family feud. The family feud (Death) is what is driving Romeo and Juliet apart.

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  7. avae1

    Oh my love! Oh my wife!
    Death, that has sucked the sweetness from your breath,
    Has had no control over your beauty.
    You are not conquered, Beauty’s sign is
    Crimson in your lips, and in your cheeks,
    And death’s pale flag has not yet overcome your beauty.
    Tybalt, do you lie in your bloody sheets?
    Oh, what more a favor can I do,
    Than kill the man who ended your life,
    With the hand that was your enemy?
    Forgive me, cousin.-Ah, dear Juliet,
    Why are you still so fair? Shall I believe
    That death shows you love,
    And keeps you in the dark to be his lover?
    I fear that and then will stay with you for eternity.
    With worms as your chambermaids.
    Here I will remain for my everlasting rest under the unfortunate stars.
    Eyes, gaze one last time,
    Arms, take your last embrace. And, lips, O, seal with the purest kiss
    My death ensures the eternal bargain.

    Come, poison, come loathsome guide!
    Desperate pilot, now crash into the rocks!
    Here’s to my love
    Apothecary, your words are true.
    Your drugs are quick. And with a kiss I die.

    In Romeo’s final speech of the play, he ensures his everlasting love for Juliet with a dramatic suicide. The fact that the reader knows Juliet is truly not dead gives us more insight on Romeo’s reaction. He wonders why her face is still full of life, and why death has not taken over just yet. In this soliloquy Romeo highlights the relationship between Love, Death and Beauty. Here Romeo fears that Death too has fallen in love with Juliet, and has taken her all for himself. To eliminate his despair, he prepares to reside with Juliet forever, using death as a method to rescue their love and her beauty.

    Additionally, in Act II, scene ii Juliet pleads for Romeo to, “Take all myself,” and here he does just that with all himself. In this scene, he personifies his own body parts and orders them to make their final impressions on the fair Juliet. By doing this, every part is consumed by his love for her. In his final moments of life Romeo takes all of Juliet with all that he has.

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  8. charlottes

    “O my love! My wife!
    Death, that has sucked the honey from her breath
    Has had no power over her beauty
    Her beauty have not been conquered yet
    There is crimson in the cheeks and lips
    And her skin has not grown pale yet
    Tybalt lies there in the bloody tomb
    O, what can I do for you?
    Than with the hand who killed you and your youth
    To separate his enemy nature
    Forgive me, cousin, Ah, my dear Juliet
    Why are you so fair? I shall believe
    That unbelievable death is romantic
    And that the lean hated monster keeps
    You here in the dark to be his lover?
    In fear that I will stay with you
    And never from this palace a dull night
    Leave again, but here I remain
    With worms that are this chamber’s maids
    Here will I set up my forever rest
    And shake the yoke of unpromising stars
    From this world-exhausted flesh. Eyes, look for the last time!
    Arms, take your last touch! And lips, O you
    The gateway of breath, seal with a noble kiss
    A dateless bargain of absorbing death!
    Come, sharp conduct, come, distasteful guide!
    Thou desperate pilot, now at once run on
    The bold rocks of the sea-sick tired bark!
    Here’s to my spouse! One true apothecary
    The drugs are fast, And with a kiss, I die.”

    In Romeo’s soliloquy, Romeo uses personification of his body parts. He talks of his eyes, arms and lips right before he dies. This is showing what he wants his body to do before he commits suicide. For his arms to touch for the last time, eyes to look for the last time and lips to kiss for the last time. He makes it like his parts are people and he is telling them “You are all going to die. Take your last look, touch and kiss before I kill all of us.” It may sound harsh, but that is literally what is Romeo doing.

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  9. ilyssal

    My love! my wife!
    Nothing may conquer my love’s beauty.
    Red lips and rosy cheeks.
    Where Tybalt lies, dead.
    What more could I do to you,
    Than with that hand that cut my youth
    Forgive me, dear Juliet.
    For fear of that, I still will stay with you
    Depart again: here, here will I stay
    Here will I set up my everlasting rest,
    Eyes, open one last time.
    Arms, take your final embrace and, lips,
    end all with a kiss.
    Here’s to my one and only love,
    The drugs, take effect quickly, and now I shall die.
    Beside my love.

    In Romeo’s verse, he personifies Death as a human. He claims death is the only thing coming between him and Juliet. Death filled her heart and brought her out of love and the real world and into a new world in heaven. Death is what has kept the Capulets and Montagues divided and now it has divided Juliet. Romeo’s love for Juliet is eternal, and will continue into the afterlife Romeo hopes.

    Reply
  10. francescaa

    Oh my wife!
    Death has sucked the sweetness out of you
    And left you about untouched
    Yet death has not yet conquered you; you are still beautiful
    There still is red in your lips and cheeks
    Your face isn’t death pale
    Tybalt are you still there in your bloody sheets?
    What can I do for you?
    With the same hand that I killed you with
    Forgive me Tybalt! Oh dear Juliet,
    How are you still so beautiful?
    Death seems to be in love with you
    And does that nasty monster keep you in the dark to be his lover?
    I am afraid of that, so I will stay with you
    And I shall never move from this graveyard
    Here is where I shall be laid to rest
    Underground where the worms live
    I will look around for the very last time
    Arms, hug Juliet one last time
    Lips, seal the doors of my very last kiss
    That make the bargain for the time of my death
    This is for you Juliet [Drinks]
    This potion works quickly. And with this kiss I die.

    From analyzing his speech, the reader learns that Romeo believes that the person “death” is responsible for Juliet’s passing. Oddly enough, this isn’t the first person who has personified death. As a matter of fact, Lady Capulet and Capulet referred to death as if it was a person. It seems as if the characters cannot accept the fact that Juliet just died. (although the reader knows it’s all staged). So, we do what humans like to do, put the blame on something. In this case, Romeo is blaming the person “Death”. This just goes to show how much agony Romeo is in. It feels much better to just but the blame on someone else rather than coming to terms of the real cause. However, to be quite honest, I don’t know if I am just overthinking this.

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  11. alexo

    O, my love, my wife!
    Death has sucked all the sweetness of your breath,
    But is has not ruined your beauty.
    You are not conquered. You still have red in your cheeks and lips.
    The paleness of death is not there yet.
    Tybalt, are you lying there under your bloody sheets?
    Is there a better favor I can do for you,
    then to kill the man that murdered you,
    with the same hand that slaughtered you so young?
    Forgive me, cousin.- Ah, Juliet,
    Why are you still so beautiful? Shall I believe
    that unsubstantial death is amorous,
    And that the evil monster keeps you here, in dark?
    I am scared of that so I will stay with you.
    And I will never depart from you again.
    Here, I will remain, with the worms.
    here, I will set up eternal sleep,
    And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars.
    From this world-wearied flesh. Looks for the last time, eyes.
    Arms, make your last embrace.
    And lips, the doors of breath, seal wth righteous kiss,
    eternal death.
    Come, poison,
    You desperate pilot,
    Crash this seasick boat into the rocks!
    Here’s to Juliet!
    That apothecary was honest.
    You drugs are quick.
    And so, with a kiss, I die.

    What we see here in these final scenes is innocent love gone wrong. Most people would agree that Romeo and Juliet had never planned for this to happen when they first met, had never planned for this when they got married, or had planned for this when romeo slew Tybalt. But, now we are here, And Romeo is dead, and Juliet to come chasing after him soon after. Their love for each other was, on the outside, so strong that Romeo killed himself to forever be in love with her. Even after all that had happened in the book, this is quite a dramatic ending. One we all saw coming, but never wanted.

    Reply
  12. Tyler Newby

    O my love, my wife!
    Death has taken your breath
    but not your beauty.
    Tybalt, is that you?
    What more can I do for you?
    O Juliet, you are still so beautiful
    Will death keep you down here forever?
    For this, I will stay here with you.
    I will never leave this place.
    Here I will stay and here I shall die.
    Eyes, make your last looks!
    Arms, make your last embrace!
    Lips, make your last kiss!
    Here’s to my love!
    The drugs are quick,
    Then, with a kiss, I die.

    In this soliloquy, Romeo is personifying death. He says “shall I believe
    That unsubstantial death is amorous,
    And that the lean abhorred monster keeps
    Thee here in dark to be his paramour?
    For fear of that, I still will stay with thee;
    And never from this palace of dim night
    Depart again: here, here will I remain”, saying that in fear of death claiming Juliet forever, he will stay in Capulet’s tomb and join her in death.

    Reply
  13. briannag3

    My love! My wife!
    Even death cannot make you any less beautiful:
    It hasn’t conquered your beauty yet,
    Your lips just as red.
    Tybalt, are you lying there under that sheet?
    What more can I do for you,
    With my hand I struck you dead
    As if you were my enemy?
    Forgive me, cousin! Dear Juliet,
    Why are you still so fair? shall I believe
    Your death seems fake,
    Like an awful creature is keeping you here.
    I will stay with you just in case;
    And I will never leave this place; O, here
    Will be the place I take my eternal rest.
    Eyes, look your last!
    Arms, have your last embrace! And lips,
    Seal my death with the last kiss!
    Come, unsavoury guide!
    Here’s to my love! [Drinks.]
    Thy drugs are quick. And with this kiss, I die. [Falls.]

    Romeo here is talking about the fact that the only thing standing between him and Juliet now is death. He also talks to his body parts as if they were other people. He tells his eyes to look one last time, his arms to have their last embrace, and his lips to have his last kiss to seal his fate. And all these actions are done to the “deceased” Juliet.

    Reply
  14. christophert3

    After finishing the Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet, we realize just how strong their love for each other was. I believe what Romeo was saying in his above speech is this:

    O, my love! My wife!
    Death, that took your spirit,
    Hasn’t affected your beauty:
    You’re not conquered; your
    lips and cheeks are still crimson,
    and death has not made them white.
    Tybalt, you’re there in this tomb too?
    O, what more can I do for you,
    Than with the hand I killed you with
    kill myself, the one who killed you?
    Forgive me, Tybalt! Ah, dear Juliet,
    Why are you still so beautiful? Shall I believe
    that your uncertain death leads me to love your beauty more,
    and that death keeps
    you here to be his wife?
    For fear of that, I will stay with you;
    And never from this dark place
    leave again: here, here will I stay
    With worms that clean this tomb; O, here
    will I die,
    and stop the unlucky cycle
    that cursed me. Eyes, look one last time!
    Arms, take your last hug! and, lips, O you
    the doors of breath, seal with a kiss
    my death!
    Come, bitter conduct, come unsavoury guide(guide of death)!
    Your desperate pilot, now crashes
    against the rocks, your tired!
    Here’s to my love![Drinks.] O true apothecary!
    Your drugs work quick. Thus, with a kiss I die. [Falls.]

    Shakespeare, in this speech, conveys how people can meet again in the afterlife and so death is just the end of one life. A metaphor that is used is referring to death as rest. I also believe that the part about the pilot was a metaphor for life, life being something that one cruises through with the often present rough winds. Death in this is when the pilot stops flying and lands, weary from the flight. Juliet, in Romeo’s perspective, had a harder time, and so her pilot got too weary faster than usual. This is what I believe this metaphor about pilots and life brought up by Romeo means. Finally, at the end of it all, he kissed Juliet, took the poison and died.

    Reply
  15. George

    O my love! my wife!
    Death, that hath suck’d the honey of thy breath,
    Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty:
    Thou art not conquer’d; beauty’s ensign yet
    Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,
    And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.
    Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet?
    O, what more favour can I do to thee,
    Than with that hand that cut thy youth in twain
    To sunder his that was thine enemy?
    Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,
    Why art thou yet so fair? shall I believe
    That unsubstantial death is amorous,
    And that the lean abhorred monster keeps
    Thee here in dark to be his paramour?
    For fear of that, I still will stay with thee;
    And never from this palace of dim night
    Depart again: here, here will I remain
    With worms that are thy chambermaids; O, here
    Will I set up my everlasting rest,
    And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars
    From this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last!
    Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O you
    The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss
    A dateless bargain to engrossing death!
    Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide!
    Thou desperate pilot, now at once run on
    The dashing rocks thy sea-sick weary bark!
    Here’s to my love! [Drinks.] O true apothecary!
    Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die. [Falls.]

    The two hours traffic of this stage is over and it has happened they are both dead. Star crossed lovers locked in eternal lines of divide. However this does not take away from the fact that they are both dead and that is at least partially their parents fault. However even though that they are “in love” i do not understand why they kill themselves. They are young and there are so many more people in the world. I also think it’s kind of ironic that she faked her death and then inadvertently caused the person that she loved so much to kill himself. Even though she wanted to spend her life with her.

    Reply
  16. willowm

    O my love! my wife!
    Death has sucked the life out of you, taking all but your beauty
    Which is not conquered.
    Your lips and cheeks are still crimson,
    And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.
    Tybalt, do you lie in your bloody sheets?
    Oh, what better favor can I do for you than killing the man who ended you, your enemy.
    Forgive me cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,
    Why are you still so beautiful? Should I believe
    That unsubstantial death desires you,
    And that the abhorred monster keeps
    You here in the dark to be his lover?
    For fear of that, here I will kill myself,
    And remain with you forever.
    Eyes, look your last!
    Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O you
    The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss
    Come, bitter poison, come, unpleasant guide!
    Desperate pilot let us crash!
    This is for my love! [Drinks.] O apothecary!
    Your drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die. [Falls.]

    In the tomb Romeo is looking at Juliet, shocked that she is still so beautiful even after death. He says,
    “Death, that hath suck’d the honey of thy breath,
    Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty:
    Thou art not conquer’d; beauty’s ensign yet
    Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,
    And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.”
    This is ironic because we readers know she is actually not dead, and that is why she is still beautiful. Romeo believes Juliet is dead and feels he cannot overcome the loss of his wife, because the friar’s letter never reached him. The moment Balthazar told Romeo he had no letters for him from the friar is where Shakespeare hinted that there was a flaw in the plan. This mistake snowballed and led to the death of Romeo, and then Juliet. It appears Shakespeare is comparing death with life, in that their death will reunite them in the afterlife.

    Reply
  17. sofiad1

    Oh, my love! my wife!
    Death, that has taken breath,
    Has not affected your beauty:
    You are not killed, your beauty is still alive,
    Your lips and cheeks are red,
    And death’s markings have not advanced there.
    Tybalt, is that you lying there in that bloody sheet?
    Oh, what more can I do for thee,
    Than with that hand that cut your youth in twain
    To sunder his that was thine enemy?
    Forgive me, Tybalt! Ah, precious Juliet,
    Why are you yet so beautiful? shall I believe
    That unsubstantial death is amorous,
    And that the lean abhorred monster keeps
    Thee here in dark to be his companion?
    For fear of that, I still will die with thee;
    And never from this place of dim night
    Will I leave again: here, here will I remain
    With the worms that are your companions; Oh, here
    Will I set up my death,
    And shake the yoke of stars
    From this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last!
    Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, Oh you
    The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss
    An endless bargain to engrossing death!
    Come, bitter happenings, come, unsavory guide!
    Thou desperate pilot, now at once run on
    The dashing rocks of your sea-sick weary bark!
    Here’s to my love! [Drinks.] Oh true apothecary!
    Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss, I will die.

    Here, Romeo uses the Vial as a kiss. He is referring to it in a way that suggests it is the “kiss of death”. He also says he is making a bargain with it, an endless one no less. He knows what he is about to do, but he also knows he is doing it for Juliet and to be with her the rest of his life, so he doesn’t care.

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  18. cameronl3

    O my love! my wife!
    Death had taken your beautiful life
    It does not affect your beauty
    You are dead physically, but your beauty lives on
    Your rosy cheeks and lips
    Are not changed by your death
    Tybalt, are you lying on that bloody sheet?
    Oh, what may I do for you
    Than with that hand that cut your youth in twain
    To sunder his that was thine enemy?
    Forgive me! Oh, Juliet,
    Why are you so beautiful? I shall believe
    That unsubstantial death is amorous,
    And that the lean abhorred monster keeps
    Thee here in dark to be his companion?
    For fear of that, I still will die you
    And never from this palace of dim night
    Separate again, for I will stay right here
    With worms that are your companions; Oh here
    Will I set up my death,
    And shake the stars
    From this life. Eyes, look your last!
    Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips,
    Take your last breath, and seal with a righteous kiss
    And endless bargain to engrossing death
    Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide!
    Thou desperate pilot, now at once run on
    The dashing rocks thy sea-sick weary bark!
    Here’s to my love! [Drinks.] O true apothecary!
    Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I will die.

    Shakespeare shows through this last scene of the play the true love between Romeo and Juliet. He shows that they will do anything to be with each other, dead or alive. They would go as far as killing themselves, instead of being separated. From living in different households, their relationship has been affected in many hindering ways. But as the story comes to a close, we see an end to the feuds, as the Capulet and Montague both realize how much they had lost, from these pointless “battles” with each other.

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  19. marinas1

    O my love, my wife,
    Death has sucked the sweetness from your breath,
    Yet it has had no power on your beauty.
    Death does not triumph over you. Beauty’s emblem yet
    Is displayed as crimson on your lips and your cheeks,
    And death’s ghostly flag has not yet reached you. –
    Tybalt, is that you lieing on your bloody sheet?
    O, what more can I do for you
    Than with the hand that has ended your youth
    To divide his youth by an enemy?
    Please forgive me, cousin. – Ah, dear Juliet,
    Why are you so beautiful? May I believe
    That intangible death is full of love,
    And that the horrendous monster keeps
    You here in the dark to be his admirer?
    Since I am afraid of that, I will stay with you
    And never from this manor of dusk
    Leave again. Here, here will I reside
    Amongst worms that are your housemaids. O, here
    Will I remain forever
    And shake the flesh of this unfavorable fate
    From this burned-out world’s skin! Eyes, see your last view.
    Arms, embrace once more. And lips, O, you
    The doors of breath, seal with an honorable kiss
    An everlasting bargain for this riveting death!
    (Kissing Juliet)
    COme, bitter guide, come, unfavorable conduct!
    You desperate sailor, now at once crash into
    The dazzling rocks by the weary seaside!
    Here is to Juliet (Drinking) O, virtuous apothecary,
    These drugs certainly are quick. Thus, with a kiss, I die.
    (He dies.)

    One thing particularly interesting about this soliloquy is how Romeo speaks of Tybalt. He says “‘Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet? O, what more favour can I do to thee, than with that hand that cut thy youth in twain to sunder his that was thine enemy? Forgive me, cousin!’” Here, it seems as if Romeo wants Tybalt to forgive him. This is explainable, for Romeo knows he is about to commit suicide, and does not wish to spend eternity with a hostile spirit by his side, nor in the afterlife. This parallels Juliet’s previous speech, in which she declares “‘Where, bloody Tybalt, yet but green in earth, lies fest’ring in his shroud; where, as they say, at some hours in the night spirits resort…’” In this excerpt, we also see how Juliet does not want Tybalt’s outraged spirit to lash out at her when she is in the tomb. This gathered evidence leads us to believe that people at the time had faith that ghosts and spirits existed. In addition, this shows us how people thought that resentments from their present lives could also exist in the afterlife, demonstrating how one lead straight into another.

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  20. eshap

    O my love, my wife,
    Death has taken away the sweetness of your breath,
    But has not yet overpowered your beauty.
    Death does not succeed over you. The appearance of you beauty
    Still shows in your crimson lips and cheeks,
    And Death’s lifeless mark has not touched you yet.-
    Tybalt, is it you who lies in that bloody shroud?
    O, what more can I do for you
    Than, with the hand that had slain you
    Slay myself, who is your enemy?
    Please forgive me, cousin. – Ah, dear Juliet,
    Why do you have to appear so beautiful? Should I believe
    That unforgiving death can be loving,
    And that the detested monster keeps
    You with him to be his lover?
    For fear of death taking you for himself, I will stay with you
    And never, from this dimly lit vault,
    Leave your side again. Here, here will I rest
    Along with worms who serve as your housemaids, O, here
    Will I put my life to an end
    And shake the core of this unfortunate fate
    From the burnt skin of the world! Eyes, see you for the last time.
    Arms, give you a final hug, And lips, O, you
    The ones who allow life, finish my life with an honorable kiss
    A long-lasting bargain for this captivating death.
    [Kissing Juliet.]
    Come, bitter guide, come, unpleasant guide!
    You despairing sailor, now about to crash into
    The dashing rocks by the weary seaside!
    Here is to Juliet. [Drinking.] O honest apothecary,
    The drug takes effect quickly. Then, with a kiss, I die.

    In this excerpt, I found Romeo’s thoughts of Death taking Juliet as his own to be interesting. Death is often personified in many novels, however, it is never characterized to be a lover. Here, Romeo says, “Shall I believe that unsubstantial death is amorous, and that the lean abhorred monster keeps thee here in the dark to be his paramour?” (lines 102-105) The idea of death being a lover goes along with the fact that Juliet’s beauty has not faded yet. Romeo fell for Juliet by her looks, and to Romeo, so did death, allowing Juliet’s beauty to remain as it is. Furthermore, having death be a lover implies that all lovers will end up dead when they are too caught up in each other. Eventually, both lovers will die, by chance or for each other, and death will take them for his own.

    On a different note, the relation between dreams and real events were similar. In Act III scene i, Romeo claims that he had dreamt of their deaths. “I dreamt my lady came and found me dead…” (line 6) This is ironic because it is actually Romeo who goes and finds Juliet dead, or appear to be dead. Here, dreams are showing events that are a possibility, even though it might not be completely accurate. There is still a chance that the dream could be a prediction of events of the real world. In Act III scene iii, Balthasar says, :I dreamt my master an another fought, and that my master slew him.” (lines 142-143) On one hand, the servingman could just have been in a dreamlike state. However, his dream was the opposite of Romeo’s. Instead of having a dream becoming a real event, something Balthasar was watching became part of his dream.

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  21. alekhya

    O my love! my wife!
    Death, which has stolen your sweet breath,
    has not taken away or changed your beauty:
    Death has not conquered you fully; Your beauty still shows in
    your red lips and flushed cheeks,,
    Death has not changed your beauty in any way.
    Tybalt, are you lying in your bloody shroud??
    O, what more can I do for you,
    with the hand that ended your life,
    than slay myself.
    To end myself who was you enemy?
    Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,
    Why are you still so beautiful? Shall I believe
    That death is lustful,
    And that this abhorred monster is keeping
    you here in dark to be his lover?
    For fear of death taking you himself, I will stay with you;
    And never leave this dark vault again: here, here will I remain
    With the worms that are your house maids; O, here
    Will I end my life and die,
    And shake the core of unfortunate fate
    From the surface of the earth. Eyes, look your last!
    Arms, give your final hug! and, lips, O you
    The opening to air, seal my death with a righteous kiss
    A endless bargain for death!
    Come, bitter conduct, come, unpleasant guide!
    You desperate sailor, now going to crash onto the sharp rocks of the worn shore.
    Here is to Juliet! [Drinks.] O truthful apothecary!
    Your drugs are quick in taking action. Now with a kiss I die.

    In this speech we are provided with more evidence to believe that romeo did indeed fall at first for Juliet’s look. When he sees her dead body he cries as to why Juliet is still so beautiful. He seems to be angry at Death for wanting to keep Juliet so beautiful will she is under his power. Romeo almost seems to behave as if Juliet’s beauty is his, a sight for only him to treasure. Throughout this entire speech, save for one sentence about Tybalt, Romeo talks about how beautiful she is and laments that her beauty is tormenting him, because perhaps it would have been easier to see her dead if she were still not so beautiful.

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  22. margauxc

    Oh, my love! My wife!
    From your breath Death may have drawn your life,
    Yet he found your beauty unfeasible to steal.
    You have not yet been seized,
    For there lies crimson upon your lips and cheeks,
    Untainted by Death’s coat of arms,
    Tybalt, there you slumber, bloodied?
    What greater courtesy can I bestow upon you,
    Than to avenge thy death with the same hand,
    Which had cut short your thread of youth?
    Spare me pardon, cousin! Oh, Juliet,
    How your splendor remains,
    I grant that you have fallen in Death’s favor,
    And are repressed here, doomed to be his lover?
    I will accompany you in fear of such,
    And vow to never leave this vault.
    These eyes shall bear their last sight!
    These arms shall meet their last embrace!
    And these lips, which guard my last breath,
    Shall share their last kiss and fulfill a promise.
    Come, acidulous poison, and be my guide!
    Pilot, bid no constraint and lead me to Death!
    In the name of my love, I drink to thee!
    What is said by the apothecary does prove true,
    For these drugs take haste. And so I shall die, graced with one last kiss.

    Certain aspects of the soliloquy given by Romeo during Act V, scene iii emphasize the desperation felt by Romeo in his dying moments. During his soliloquy, Romeo laments the larceny which has befallen his Juliet- and his words, laced with sorrow and agony, are conveyed in several different styles. One could possibly discern/over-analyze that, as Romeo mourns his lost love, he makes very subtle references/connections to his monologue in Act I, scene i. Earlier in the play, Romeo reflects, “Love is a smoke made with the fume of sighs; Being purged, a fire sparkling in lovers’ eyes; Being vexed, a sea nourished with loving tears. What is it else? A madness most discreet, a choking gall, and a preserving sweet.” (lines 197-201). In Act V, scene iii, when Romeo declares, “The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss,”- the doors of breath being sealed can be seen as Romeo taking his last sigh, and ultimately marking the end of his fume of sighs. In this perspective, one could also link Romeo’s comparison to love being a preserving sweet to the phrase, “Death, that hath suck’d the honey of thy breath.” The sweetness/honey of the fume of sighs accumulated by Juliet are gone- and their is love is lost as well. The passion which Romeo claims to sparkle in lovers’ eyes when love is being purged can potentially be connected to Romeo’s line, “Eyes, look your last!”- seeing as Romeo’s eyes, which are presumably showing distraught and woe, would also indicate his feeling of a fiery determination to follow Juliet to the grave. Another reference/connection which can be drawn is when comparing the two phrases, “Being vexed, a sea nourished with loving tears,” and “Thou desperate pilot, now at once run on the dashing rocks thy sea-sick weary bark!” Love being juxtaposed to a sea is a common theme in both speeches, and can therefore, in a certain perspective, be seen as a reference/connection. Romeo somewhat subtly referencing his monologue from Act I provides a sense of closure for the play and gives a satisfying end to Romeo’s character.

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  23. laurena2

    O my love! My wife!
    Death has taken the sweetness out of my life
    But has not stolen your beauty
    Your lips and cheeks, the color of crimson
    Death has not turned you pale
    Does Tybalt lie among these bodies?
    O, what more can I do
    Than with the hand that killed Tybalt
    To say that he was my enemy?
    Forgive me, cousin! Ah dear Juliet,
    How are you so beautiful? Shall I believe
    Your death is admirable
    And that death keeps
    You here to admire you?
    And we will never depart from here
    Here, I will remain
    Here I will rest with you forever
    Your eyes and lips will stay with me
    And keep this everlasting kiss
    Death may run on
    Here’s to my love! [Drinks.]
    These drugs work quickly, and here I die, leaving you with a kiss.

    Romeo keeps talking about death as if it is a human figure. By doing so, It is easier to see how Juliet is being ripped away from him, and he has absolutely no control over it. Throughout the play, many people are ripping them apart and acting as obstacles for their love. Now, death is their biggest obstacle that is impossible to overcome.

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  24. adam

    O my love, my lady!
    Death has struck her
    It had no reason
    It reached and captured her
    And a i still love you
    And shall never leave

    Yet she is not pale
    Is she with Tybalt?
    Oh I could do better
    Forgive me Tybalt
    Oh Juliet you are so beautiful
    Your death is upsetting
    I will stay here with you
    And kiss you and it shall last
    Here is to you my love
    I will be with you soon, and here I shall die with a kiss.

    This shows the trumendous sacrifice they will make for eachother and how much they think they need eachother. No matter what it takes, including death, nothing will stop them from being together. This shows the irony because Juliet thinks she is dead and is killing himself when she expects him to be alive soon.

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  25. Rebecca F

    O my love! My wife!
    Death, that has sucked the honey from your breath
    Has no power over your beauty:
    You aren’t conquered: your beauty is still there
    In the crimson of your lips and your cheeks,
    Death’s pale flag has not advanced on your beauty.
    Tybalt, are you lying there in your bloody shroud?
    O, what greater favor can I for your you,
    Than with this hand that killed your youth
    To cleave your enemy?
    Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,
    Why are you so fair? Shall I believe
    That unsubstantial love is romantic,
    And that the lean horrendous monster keeps
    You in the dark to be his paramour?
    For fear of that, I will stay with you
    And never from this palace of dim light
    Leave again: here i will remain
    With worms that are your chamber maids; O, here
    Will I set up me everlasting rest,
    And shake the burden of unfavorable fate
    From this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last!
    Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O you
    The doors of breath, close with a noble kiss
    A timeless bargain to death!
    Come, bitter conduct, come here, unsavory guide!
    You desperate sailor, now you will run to
    the rocky shore!
    Here’s to Juliet! O truthful apothecary!
    Your drugs act quickly! And so, with a kiss, I die.

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  26. ivanl

    O my love! My wife!
    Death has taken your breath, but not your beauty
    Your lips and cheeks are still crimson
    For the paleness of death has not fully taken you
    And Tybalt, are you still there lying in your blood?
    What can I do for you
    For you to forgive me for killing you
    Juliet, you are still so beautiful!
    I will not leave you with this monster, and I will never leave this palace of dim light
    I will rest with you forever
    Take your last look eyes, take your last embrace arms, and take your last breath lips
    And come poison!
    Here’s to Juliet!
    The drugs are quick and I will die, with this final kiss.

    Shakespeare is showing Romeo’s despair and grief with this soliloquy. He is so deeply struck by the ‘death’ of Juliet, unaware that she is only in a deep sleep by a drug given by the friar. Believing that she is truly dead, and will lay in this tomb forever, he takes the poison given to him by the apothecary, and drinks, so he may rest forever with her in the tomb.

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