May 15 2017

Come, vial.

Tonight, please read Act II, scenes iii and iv.  Then, please paraphrase and analyze the “Come, Vial” speech.  After your paraphase, analyze how Juliet has changed over the course of the play so far.

Come, vial.
What if this mixture do not work at all?
Shall I be married then to-morrow morning?
No, no: this shall forbid it: lie thou there.

(Laying down her dagger)

What if it be a poison, which the friar
Subtly hath minister’d to have me dead,
Lest in this marriage he should be dishonour’d,
Because he married me before to Romeo?
I fear it is: and yet, methinks, it should not,
For he hath still been tried a holy man.
How if, when I am laid into the tomb,
I wake before the time that Romeo
Come to redeem me? there’s a fearful point!
Shall I not, then, be stifled in the vault,
To whose foul mouth no healthsome air breathes in,
And there die strangled ere my Romeo comes?
Or, if I live, is it not very like,
The horrible conceit of death and night,
Together with the terror of the place,–
As in a vault, an ancient receptacle,
Where, for these many hundred years, the bones
Of all my buried ancestors are packed:
Where bloody Tybalt, yet but green in earth,
Lies festering in his shroud; where, as they say,
At some hours in the night spirits resort;–
Alack, alack, is it not like that I,
So early waking, what with loathsome smells,
And shrieks like mandrakes’ torn out of the earth,
That living mortals, hearing them, run mad:–
O, if I wake, shall I not be distraught,
Environed with all these hideous fears?
And madly play with my forefather’s joints?
And pluck the mangled Tybalt from his shroud?
And, in this rage, with some great kinsman’s bone,
As with a club, dash out my desperate brains?
O, look! methinks I see my cousin’s ghost
Seeking out Romeo, that did spit his body
Upon a rapier’s point: stay, Tybalt, stay!
Romeo, I come! this do I drink to thee.

(She falls upon her bed, within the curtains.)

R&J blog #15


Copyright © 2016. All rights reserved.

Posted May 15, 2017 by equinson in category Romeo and Juliet

26 thoughts on “Come, vial.

  1. ilyssal

    This is the vial, what if it does not work?
    What shall I do come morning when I will be wed if it fails?
    What if he vows can not be completed, because the Friar already married me to Romeo?
    Or if Romeo is not there waiting when I wake up.
    I would suffocate.
    In the tomb where Tybalt lies.
    The air would surround me in the dark of night and kill me.
    Romeo, my true love, here I come!
    I drink this vial for you!

    Over the course of the play, Juliet has developed a stronger character. She is no where near as shy as she began the play. Juliet is also growing up and becoming more mature and independent. She has learned to speak her mind and voice her thoughts and opinions when days earlier she may not have acted the same. She has realized how important Romeo is to her and she changed herself to allow herself to love him. Juliet has shaped herself into a wife, rather than a young, innocent girl.

    Reply
  2. alexo

    Come, vial.
    What if this mixture does not work?
    Will I marry Paris?
    No, no: this shall not allow it. Lie there.
    What if it’s a poison, which the friar
    Subtly gave me to kill me,
    For in this marriage he be dishonored,
    Because he has already married mte to Romeo?
    I fear it is; and yet, I don’t think it is.
    For he is still a holy man.
    What if I, when put into my tomb,
    I awake before Romeo saves me? That’s scary!
    Shall I not, then, be stifled in the vault,
    to the foul stench no fresh air gives,
    And die fighting for breath before Romeo comes?
    Or, if I survive, it’s not like,
    the horrible conceit of death and night,
    combined with the terror of the place-
    As an ancient place,
    Where for many hundred years, my ancestors have layed.
    Where violent Tybalt, green in the earth,
    Lies rotting in his shroud; where, as they say,
    sometimes during the night spirits come out;-
    Ahh, Ahh, it isnot like that I,
    So early waking, what with terrible smells,
    and ghostly shrieks that make humans go mad:-
    If I wake up, will I be ready,
    for all these hideous fears?
    And go mad and play with my forefather’s bones?
    And take Tybalt out of his shroud?
    Shall I dash out with a club?
    O, look! I think I see my cousin’s ghost
    Seeking out Romeo, that did kill him
    Upon the point of a rapier: stay, Tybalt, stay!
    Romeo, I am coming! I drink this for you.

    Here we can see that Juliet is much more dramatic then when she was from the start of the book. Originally, Juliet was a very calm, quite young girl, someone that innocently fell in love with another man. Now, Juliet is willing to go to the extremes to stay with her 1-day husband, Not wishing to sin or marry Paris, she is willing to take drugs, be buried for two days, and be considered dead. All to be with Romeo. As discussed in class, Romeo has not changed, but Juliet for sure has.

    Reply
  3. Toa Neil

    After analyzing Come, vial.
    What if this mixture do not work at all?
    Shall I be married then to-morrow morning?
    No, no: this shall forbid it: lie thou there.
    (Laying down her dagger)

    What if it be a poison, which the friar
    Subtly hath minister’d to have me dead,
    Lest in this marriage he should be dishonour’d,
    Because he married me before to Romeo?
    I fear it is: and yet, methinks, it should not,
    For he hath still been tried a holy man.
    How if, when I am laid into the tomb,
    I wake before the time that Romeo
    Come to redeem me? there’s a fearful point!
    Shall I not, then, be stifled in the vault,
    To whose foul mouth no healthsome air breathes in,
    And there die strangled ere my Romeo comes?
    Or, if I live, is it not very like,
    The horrible conceit of death and night,
    Together with the terror of the place,–
    As in a vault, an ancient receptacle,
    Where, for these many hundred years, the bones
    Of all my buried ancestors are packed:
    Where bloody Tybalt, yet but green in earth,
    Lies festering in his shroud; where, as they say,
    At some hours in the night spirits resort;–
    Alack, alack, is it not like that I,
    So early waking, what with loathsome smells,
    And shrieks like mandrakes’ torn out of the earth,
    That living mortals, hearing them, run mad:–
    O, if I wake, shall I not be distraught,
    Environed with all these hideous fears?
    And madly play with my forefather’s joints?
    And pluck the mangled Tybalt from his shroud?
    And, in this rage, with some great kinsman’s bone,
    As with a club, dash out my desperate brains?
    O, look! methinks I see my cousin’s ghost
    Seeking out Romeo, that did spit his body
    Upon a rapier’s point: stay, Tybalt, stay!
    Romeo, I come! this do I drink to thee.
    (She falls upon her bed, within the curtains.)

    I noticed a few things, for one she really has changed in a short while, willing to fake death for “love”. She also doubts this plan which shows that she might have an inkling this will not end well. Also this plan seems to be interesting in that it makes no sense. Friar Lawrence could take her out of the tomb, or she could have poisoned Paris. However, she plays her part well and it will succeed unless something easily preventabl were to happen, But that’s crazy, *cough*yeah right*cough*.

    Reply
  4. caias1

    Here is the vial, but what if it does not work?
    Would I be married tomorrow? No, this knife would prevent that
    What if the Friar gave my this potion to kill me?
    Is he worried of someone disgracing him because he already married me to Romeo?
    I am afraid it is, but he is a trustworthy man.
    But what if, when I am placed in the tomb, I wake before Romeo arrives?
    What if I suffocate in there? The vault has no healthy air
    Or if I survive, it will be dark and filled with bones down there.
    Tybalt’s body will be there.
    And don’t spirits roam down there at night?
    What if I wake to awful smells?
    I’ll hear maddening screams
    If I wake before Romeo comes, I might go insane with all the terrible things in the tomb.
    I might start playing with my ancestors bones; take Tybalt’s corpse out of his burial shroud
    What if I start hurting myself with my ancestors bones?
    I think I see Tybalt’s ghost, searching for his killer
    Oh, Romeo! I drink this for you

    Throughout the play, we have seen Juliet go from a girl who followed her mother’s approval to someone who is becoming more independent. The first time a marriage to Paris was brought up, she said she would only take an interest in him if her mother gave her permission. Now, she stands up to her father, telling him that she will not marry Paris because she does not love him. Juliet does her best to stay faithful to Romeo, even though her family is pushing her to do something she really does not want to do.

    Reply
  5. tarika1

    What if the poison does not work and I have to get married?
    This will prevent it
    (Laying down her dagger)
    What if this vial contains venom that will kill me?
    Then he would be dishonored,
    Because he married me to Romeo?
    I fear it is, but I do not think so
    Because he is till a holy man.
    But what if I am in the tomb
    And I wake up before Romeo comes, that would be scary!
    Then I will be locked in a dead man’s tomb.
    And if I die by suffocation?
    or if I live, it is not going to look like night
    Together with the frightfulness of the place,
    And being in the tomb of hundreds of my ancestors
    Where Tybalt is still fresh in his grave,
    At some hours in the night spirits resort;–
    It is not like that I,
    Waking up with bad smells,
    And shrieks,
    That are terrifying,
    If I wake will I be scared?
    Envisioning all these hideous fears?
    The fears of Tybalt, dead ancestors, and foul smells.
    Romeo, here I come! I do this for you.
    (She drinks the vial and falls upon her bed, within the curtains.)

    Throughout the play, Juliet has changed as a character. In the early acts of the story, Juliet rarely talked and when she did she had very short lines. As her love for Romeo and the story progressed, she began to talk much more. In This speech, she has a whole page of text which she never has had before. Notice all of her speech is about Romeo and her worries about their love for eachother. She has more lines when she talks about Romeo and as the story progresses.

    Reply
  6. charlottes

    “Come, vial
    What if this poison fails?
    Will I have to marry Paris?
    No no; this shall stop it
    What if this potion, from the friar
    Was simply given to kill me
    Well in this marriage, he should be dishonored
    Because he married me and Romeo
    I fear this; and yet I think not
    For us he has been a holy man
    However, what if I am still in the tomb
    And woken before Romeo
    comes to get me? Oh the fearful thought!
    Shall I not then, be preserved in the vault
    To the rotten smell no fresh air can receive
    And die trying to breath before Romeo arrives?
    Or, if I manage to live, it isn’t like
    The horrible conceit of death and night\
    Together in the terror of the place
    As in a vault, an ancient place
    Where for hundreds of years,
    My ancestors are buried
    Where Tybalt, green in Earth
    Lies in his tomb, where, as they say
    Some hours in the night, spirits are common-
    Alack Alack, it isn’t likely that I
    Wake up early, with such lonely scents
    And yells like mandrakes’ torn out of the planet
    That living beings, hear them, go crazy-
    Oh, If I wake up, i shall not be concerned
    Surrounded with these ghastly fears?
    And crazily play with my forefathers limbs?
    And take out the crumbled pieces of Tybalt from this tomb?
    And in this madness, with some great kinsman’s body
    As with a heavy object, crush out by brains?
    Oh look! I think I see my cousin’s ghost
    Looking for Romeo, who slain his body
    Upon a rapier’s point: Stay Tybalt, stay!
    Romeo, I am coming! Noe, I do drink thee”

    Over the course of the play, Juliet has grown stronger. In the beginning, she spoke small fragments and not for long, but now she is saying hundreds of words, spewing her feelings into the world. Her character has developed and she is acting more mature (even though she is twelve and has only known Romeo for three days) that when we first met her the night of the party.

    Reply
    1. christophert3

      You are completely right. I also must say, after you bring up the time span of this play, you realize that all of this maturing she’s done happened within three days. It’s kind of sad. I think of myself as less mature than her. 😀

      Reply
  7. faithw

    Here is the bottle
    What happens if the mixture doesn’t work?
    Will I be forced to marry Paris tomorrow?
    No, this dagger will prevent the marriage from taking place.
    What if the Friar mixed the poison to kill me?
    Is he worried he will be dishonored if he
    Has to marry me to Paris after he married me to Romeo?
    I’m frightened that it’s a poison, yet I know I shouldn’t worry
    The Friar is a righteous, holy man.
    But what if when I am placed in my coffin,
    I wake up before
    Romeo comes to rescue me? That is what I’m terrified of.
    What if I am trapped in the vault, and suffocate from the unhealthy air?
    I will die before Romeo reaches me.
    Or, if I live, I will be enclosed by death and darkness.
    There will be bones of my hundred year old ancestors in the vault.
    Tybalt’s lifeless body lies in the crypt, freshly buried.
    It’s rumored that the spirits come to life at night.
    Oh no
    I will wake up to the abhorrent scents
    And shrieks that would cause any living mortal listening to go mad
    If I wake up too early, I will be very distraught
    With things to be afraid of all around me
    Will I start playing with my ancestors bones?
    And pluck the mangled Tybalt from his shroud
    Out of anger, will I grab one of my dead ancestor’s bones
    And use it to strike myself in the head?
    Oh look! I think I see Tybalt’s ghost
    He’s seeking his murderer, Romeo Wait Tybalt!
    Romeo, Romeo, Romeo! Here’s the drink. I drink to you.

    In the beginning stages of the play, Juliet hardly ever spoke and when she did, she talked for a very short period of time. As the Shakespearean tragedy progressed, Juliet’s discourse grew longer and occurred more frequently. Juliet underwent an extreme transformation in her personality. Her character developed from a shy girl, who wouldn’t dare to oppose orders from her family, into an independent lady. Juliet also displayed courage by drinking the potion that she believed to be filled with poison.

    Reply
  8. sofiad1

    Come, vial.
    What if this poison fails dramatically?
    Will I be married then tomorrow morning?
    No, no: this shall stop it: stay there.
    (Laying down her dagger)

    What if it is a poison, which the friar
    Gave to me in order to kill me.
    Because this marriage would disparage his honor.
    Because he married me before to Romeo?
    I fear it is: and yet, I think, e would not,
    For he is still a holy man.
    How if, when I die,
    I wake before the time that Romeo
    Comes to get me? there’s a terrifying point!
    Shall I not, then, be put in the vault,
    To whose terrible stench no good air comes in,
    And there die suffocated when my Romeo comes?
    Or, if I live, is it not alike,
    The horrible closing of death and night,
    Together with the horrific-ness of the place,–
    As in a vault, an ancient receptacle,
    Where, for many hundred years, the bones
    Of all my buried ancestors are housed:
    Where bloody Tybalt, yet but newly dead,
    Lies decomposing in his shroud; where, as they say,
    At some hours in the night spirits will;–
    Alack, alack, is it not like that I,
    So early waking, what with disgusting smells,
    And screams like mandrakes’ ripped from the earth,
    That living mortal, hearing them, run mad:–
    O, if I wake, shall I not be upset,
    Surrounded with all these hideous fears?
    And madly play with my grandfather’s joints?
    And pluck the mangled Tybalt from his shroud?
    And, in this rage, with some great kinsman’s bone,
    As with a club, beat out my brains
    O, look! I think I see my cousin’s ghost
    Seeking out Romeo, that did spit his body
    Upon a rapier’s point: stay, Tybalt, stay!
    Romeo, I come! this do I drink to thee.

    Over the course of the play, Juliet has changed very much. At the beginning, she had barely any lines and was only doing what her parents told her. Now, she is pretending to die just to be with her SWORN ENEMY. She is also much more emotional. She is currently doing this for her one true love, Romeo. The only reason she is second guessing is because she thinks Friar Lawerence might be sabotaging her.

    Reply
  9. arihantp1

    Come vial
    What if this mixture does not work?
    Will I be married tomorrow morning?
    No, no, I rather die than let that happen
    (Lays down dagger beside her)
    What if it is poison
    What if the Friar wants me dead
    He would be dishonored
    Because he did marry Romeo and I
    I fear it is poison
    But the Friar is a holy man, and he wouldn’t do such a thing
    But what if, I lay there in the tomb
    But wake up before Romeo comes
    Thats a scary thought!
    Shall I not suffocate in the vault
    With no air to breathe
    Shall Romeo find me strangled in the vault
    There is a slim chance that I will survive
    The horrible thought of death and night
    The bones of my ancestors lay there
    And Tybalt fresh corpse lays there as well
    There will be shrieks and smells that will terrify me
    Will my forefathers walk among me
    Will Tybalt rise from the grave
    Will they fight Romeo when he comes to save me
    Oh Romeo I come, I will be seeing you soon

    Juliet is clearly scared about the Friar’s plan. She is thinking about all the things that could go wrong, and how she could die in many painful ways. She knows how everything could go wrong, and starts to doubt going through with the plan. However, she is willing to die for Romeo, which show her “love” toward him. This drastic change of personality in Juliet is interesting. She first was an obedient girl, and now is willing to commit suicide for her husband. Also, Juliet has known Romeo for less than a week, this could show how young people are more attracted to looks rather than personality.

    Reply
  10. briannag3

    Come, vial.
    What happens if this doesn’t work?
    Will I have to marry Paris tomorrow morning?
    No, it will work..
    (Laying down her dagger)

    What if it’s actually a poison,
    And the friar wants to kill me,
    If I marry Paris he will be dishonored
    For he is the one who wed me to Romeo?
    I am scared, but still I think
    He is being truthful as a priest.
    However, what if I wake up
    Before Romeo comes for me?
    Will I happen to die in that tomb
    While Romeo is on his way?
    And if I live,
    The fear of death and the night,
    Together with the terror of the place,–
    As in a vault, an ancient tomb,
    Where all my dead ancestors
    Are buried:
    Where Tybalt lays among them,
    At some hour their spirits come alive–
    Alack, alack, is it not like that I,
    So waking early, what with awful smells,
    And shrieks like mandrakes’ torn out of the earth,
    That living people will go mad when hearing them:–
    And when I wake, will I not be
    Haunted with these fears?
    And mess with my fathers head?
    And bring Tybalt’s spirit from his dead body?
    And, in this rage, with some great kinsman’s bone,
    As with a club, dash out my desperate brains?
    I think I see my cousin’s ghost
    Looking for Romeo, that killed him
    Stop Tybalt, stop!
    Romeo, I come! I drink to you.

    At first Juliet is frightened about Friar Lawrence’s plan. She wonders if it’s actually is poison and he just wants her dead. She reassures herself that it isn’t true. However, she thinks of other frightening outcomes to the plan. She thinks about all her dead ancestors and wonders if their spirits will talk to her. At the end she assures herself that she’ll be fine and that this is for Romeo and drinks the vial.

    Reply
  11. avae1

    Come, vial.
    What if this poison does not work at all?
    Will I marry Paris tomorrow morning?
    No, no, this shall prevent our marriage.
    What if this mixture was given by the friar to kill me?
    Is it because he will be dishonored from marrying me to Romeo first?
    I fear it is, and yet it couldn’t be,
    For he is a holy man.
    What if I wake in the tomb before Romeo finds me? That frightens me.
    Will I be stuck in the vault without any breathable air,
    and suffocated before Romeo comes?
    Or if I live, consumed by death and night.
    The vault filled with the bones of my ancient ancestors,
    And where the fallen Tybalt lies, green in the earth.
    They say sometimes the spirits are awoken at night
    If I wake early, I will smell the horrendous odors,
    And hear the mandrakes shriek.
    Enveloped by these fears, I will take the remains of my ancestors,
    and Tybalt’s mangled corpse,
    and like a club, strike my own brain.
    I think I see Tybalt now, seeking his killer,
    Stay Tybalt!
    Oh Romeo I drink for you!

    Over the course of the play, which has only been three days, Juliet has evolved great amounts. Her confidence level in the presence of others has changed dramatically. Specifically in the beginning of the play, when Lady Capulet sought Juliet to find her opinions on marriage, Juliet was very obedient. She replied in short phrases and promised to never find interest in a boy without her mother’s permission. After meeting Romeo, Juliet displayed more rebellious qualities, and even though she knew what she was doing was sinful, she did it anyways. Juliet now has more lines of speech and makes long, emotional soliloquies and monologues. Here she declares her fears for this plan, which is not very reliable to begin with. She thinks about every possibility and they all concern her, and yet drinks the vile to protect her marriage. Although she does take more risks, she still shows signs of concern and looking towards the future.

    Reply
  12. francescaa

    What is this potion doesn’t work?
    I will end up marrying Paris

    No, this won’t work
    What if the poison the Friar gave me kills me?
    Then he will be the one dishonored
    Because he was the one married me and Romeo
    I am scared, but yet I believe that he was trying to be a holy man
    What if I am laid in the tomb and wake up before Romeo comes?
    That is a frightful thought
    If I end up locked in the tomb
    Where I cannot breathe any air
    If i live I won’t be able to forget the images of when I was in that tomb
    Being in the tomb of all my ancestors
    Where Tybalt was just buried
    Lying fresh in his sheets, as they say
    And during the night ghosts are common
    It is not like that I
    Wake up with a putrid smell
    And hear screams that pierce the ears
    If living people heard them they would go mad
    But, when I wake up I shall not be horrified
    Surrounded with all these terrible fears
    And play with my grandfather’s wrists
    And pluck Tybalt from his tomb
    While I am in rage I will take the bone of a Kingsman
    And wash out my outrageous mind
    Oh wait, I think I see Tybalt’s ghost
    Trying to seek revenge on Romeo
    Oh what a white ghost
    Upon the point of a sword, stay Tybalt, don’t move
    Romeo, Romeo, Romeo
    I drink this poison for you Romeo

    Over the course of the three day’s the reader has known Juliet, we have seen her grow into a much different person than what we saw in the beginning of the novel. In the beginning, Juliet was a shy, respectful, squeaky- clean, little girl. Her innocence was proven when she asked for permission to look at boys . However, as the play has progressed, we have seen Juliet completely bust out of her shell. Juliet now does many things in secrecy; something she never really did before. In a span of three days, Juliet has done so many shady things behind the backs of her parents. First, she got married to “the enemy” without any consent whatsoever. Secondly, there have been multiple occasions where Romeo and Juliet meet in secret and now she is drinking a potion so that she can get out of marrying Paris! And the best part is, her parents have absolutely no clue. I know that Juliet is a fictional character, but it is amazing how much one could change in a matter of a couple of days.

    Reply
  13. maddy

    Here is the vial.
    What am I to do if its contents are ineffective?
    Will I still be wedded tomorrow morning?
    No, no, this dagger will prevent such a prospect. I will repose here.

    (Laying down her dagger)

    What if this concoction is poisonous, which the friar
    Subtly blended to kill me,
    In fear that he will be dishonored,
    If I marry Paris after he has wedded me to Romeo already?
    I suspect that this vile does contain poison. Yet, this suspection should not be true,
    For he has proven to be both holy and dependable.
    What if, once I am laid inside the tomb,
    I awake before Romeo comes to my rescue? That is quite a dismaying thought!
    Will I not suffocate inside the tomb?
    There is not a sufficient amount of air to breathe in there,
    Will I die of suffocation before Romeo’s arrival?
    Or if I will live, I will be confined to the dark, surrounded by death,
    Oh, how dreadful this will be!
    There will be the ancient remnants of my ancestors in that tomb:
    Where Tybalt’s body, entombed as of not long ago,
    Will be decaying: where, as it is said,
    Come nightfall, the spirits are in tombs;–
    Alas, I will awake and smell horrid fetors,
    And hear wailing so menacing as to make one mad:–
    Oh, If I awake, will I not be fraught,
    Surrounded by all of these frights?
    And begin to twiddle with the bones of my ancestors?
    And pull Tybalt’s corpse from his obscurity of death?
    Will I bash in my own skull with the bones of my deceased ancestors?
    Oh, look! I believe I see the ghost of my departed cousin
    He is seeking Romeo, for it is he who killed him
    With his sword: wait a moment, Tybalt, wait!
    Romeo, I am on my way! I drink in your honor.

    (She falls upon her bed, within the curtains.)

    This soliloquy depicts how drastically Juliet has changed due to Romeo. In the first act, she was written as reserved and pragmatic. Her lines were usually brief, and she kept a logical viewpoint of her relationship with him. Juliet became worrisome and pessimistic over the tragedy’s progression, as portrayed within this excerpt. She melodramatically rambles of the unlikely potential faults that could occur within her rescue plan. It is probable that Juliet’s character has changed because as the plot of “Romeo and Juliet” progresses, the tragedy further proceeds. Juliet can thus be classified as a dynamic character because she evolves along with the plot.

    Reply
  14. cameronl3

    What if the poison does not go into effect and I must get married?
    This will prevent that
    *Laying down her dagger*
    What if this vial contains ingredients that can kill me?
    Then he would be dishonored,
    Because he married me with Romeo?
    I fear this, but do not think so
    As he is a holy man.
    But what if I am in the tomb
    And I wake before Romeo even arrives.
    Then I will be stuck in a tomb.
    And if I die by suffocation?
    or if I live, it is not just going to be dark
    Along with the fright of the atmosphere
    And being in the tomb of hundreds of my past family
    Where Tybalt is still in his grave,
    Sometime the spirits come back
    It is not like that I,
    Waking up with stench,
    And shrieks,
    That are horrifying.
    Will I be frightened?
    Thinking about all these fears?
    The fears of Tybalt, dead ancestors, and foul smells.
    Romeo! I do this for you.

    Juliet has experienced a significant change as a character from when we met her to her present state. We saw Juliet as a very quiet, respectful, and charming girl who followed whatever her parents said. She told Lady Capulet that she will look into Paris, as they were supposed to get married. After meeting Romeo, lots of her personality changed. She seemed to be much more bitter towards her parents’ decisions for her. Such as the marriage with Paris. She is completely opposed to it, and even brings up suicide if she must marry Paris. We also see a lot more speaking from Juliet, instead of being quieter.

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  15. christophert3

    What an odd scene we read today. We’re reading of characters from long ago taking drugs in the name of love. In the scene, Juliet takes the mixture and falls asleep. The above speech is Juliet worrying of all the possibilities that could happen, everything that could go wrong. And then she takes it, for Romeo. From this speech, we know that Juliet would face her grave, literally, for Romeo. We learn of how strong her love for him is and how dedicated she is to him. Another thing she worries about is the effects of the potion, either not working or being a terrible poison for Friar Lawrence. These are things we can derive from Juliet’s speech above.

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  16. ivanl

    Come vial
    What if it does not work? Will I be forced to marry tomorrow?
    My knife will ensure I don’t
    What if this vial actually contains poison?
    For he wants to kill because he feels dishonored for marrying me to Romeo
    I do not think this is true
    For he is a trustworthy person
    But what if I wake before Romeo arrives? Will I suffocate alone in the tomb?
    What a fearful thought!
    But if I survive, I will never forget the tomb
    The freshly-buried Tybalt lies, with nightly spirits
    The stench and screeches horrify me
    And yet, I do this for you Romeo!

    Juliet has changed a large amount since the beginning of the play. When we had first met her, she had been shy, barely speaking any words to Romeo, and always just following along with what Romeo had done. Now that she is more comfortable with Romeo and deeply in love with him, she speaks more, as well as expresses her feelings more. In this particular scene, we can see her feelings expressed in such a way for her desired love of Romeo, she is willing to fake her own death so she can be with Romeo.

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  17. marinas1

    Come, vial.
    What if this mixture does not function correctly?
    Shall I then be married tomorrow?
    (SHe takes out her dagger and places it beside her)
    Of course not, this knife shall interdict this. I will rest here.
    What if the Frair has planted poison into this substance
    Craftily putting me to death
    For in this marriage he woudld provide a disgrace from God towards the Frair
    Due to his responsibility in marrying me to Romeo?
    I trepidate that it may be so. Yet, it probably is not,
    For he has alwayd been a holy man.
    But what if, when I am situated inside the tomb,
    I wake up before Romeo
    Has even arrived? Well there is quite the frightening though.
    Then I will be trapped in this vault,
    Where there is no fresh air to breathe,
    And there I die, throttled, before my Romeo has a chance to see e alive?
    Or, if I were to live, it would be not likely that
    The awful images of death and nightfall,
    Alltogether with the horror of this place-
    As in a tomb, an ancient, inclosed repository
    Where for centuries the bones
    Of all my late predessosors are inclosed
    Where the fallen Tybalt, not even having resided there for a week
    Lies, infecting his grave; where, as they say,
    At some of the late hours of darkness spirits retreat-
    Alas, alas, it is not likely that I
    Will wake, with all the detestable aromas,
    And cries from mandrakes being yanked out of the ground
    That, living mortals, in cathcing their shrieks, drive themselves insane-
    Or, if I do indeed wake, I shall not be distressed,
    ALready situated with all these fears
    And I shall play with my ancient relative’s old, decaying joints,
    And pluck the once-bleeding Tybalt from his grave,
    And, in this madness, with some kinsman’s bone,
    As wiht a club, I will beat my brains out of my head?
    Oh, look, I think I see Tybalt’s ghost already,
    Ready to find Roemo,
    And kill him! Patience, Tybalt, wait!
    Romeo, Romeo, Romeo! Here’s my vial. Romeo, I drink to you.
    (She drinks the misture and collapses onto her bed)

    After reading this passage, we do indeed see just how drastically Juliet has changed over the past couple of weeks. She is no longer the obedient girl she once was. Here, she disobeys her parents’s words, going against their advice, coming off as incredibly impetuous and greedy, for she does what is best for her, and not what is best for her family. Althoug in modern day this may seem like the correct and righteos motto (doing what is best for you), this was certaintly not the case in Europe during the time period of this play. Juliet, as nearly every woman of nobility, was expected to listen to her parents, and do what is right for the family. Here, however, Juliet goes against this overarching idea, and pretends to die for Romeo, making a sacrifice for a boy she had only met just a few days ago. In this play, water is certaintly seen as thicker than blood.

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  18. marinas1

    Sorry! That was without checking for spelling and grammar errors!

    Come, vial.
    What if this mixture does not function correctly?
    Shall I then be married tomorrow?
    (She takes out her dagger and places it beside her)
    Of course not, this knife shall interdict this. I will rest here.
    What if the Frair has planted poison into this substance
    Craftily putting me to death
    For in this marriage he would provide a disgrace from God towards the Frair
    Due to his responsibility in marrying me to Romeo?
    I trepidation that it may be so. Yet, it probably is not,
    For he has always been a holy man.
    But what if, when I am situated inside the tomb,
    I wake up before Romeo
    Has even arrived? Well, there is quite the frightening though.
    Then I will be trapped in this vault,
    Where there is no fresh air to breathe,
    And there I die, throttled before my Romeo has a chance to see e alive?
    Or, if I were to live, it would be not likely that
    The awful images of death and nightfall,
    Altogether with the horror of this place-
    As in a tomb, an ancient, inclosed repository
    Where for centuries the bones
    Of all my late predecessors are enclosed
    Where the fallen Tybalt, not even having resided there for a week
    Lies, infecting his grave; where, as they say,
    At some of the late hours of darkness spirits retreat-
    Alas, alas, it is not likely that I
    Will wake, with all the detestable aromas,
    And cries from mandrakes being yanked out of the ground
    That, living mortals, in catching their shrieks, drive themselves insane-
    Or, if I do indeed wake, I shall not be distressed,
    Already situated with all these fears
    And I shall play with my ancient relative’s old, decaying joints,
    And pluck the once-bleeding Tybalt from his grave,
    And, in this madness, with some kinsman’s bone,
    As with a club, I will beat my brains out of my head?
    Oh, look, I think I see Tybalt’s ghost already,
    Ready to find Romeo,
    And kill him! Patience, Tybalt, wait!
    Romeo, Romeo, Romeo! Here’s my vial. Romeo, I drink to you.
    (She drinks the mixture and collapses onto her bed)

    After reading this passage, we do indeed see just how drastically Juliet has changed over the past couple of weeks. She is no longer the obedient girl she once was. Here, she disobeys her parents’ words, going against their advice, coming off as incredibly impetuous and greedy, for she does what is best for her, and not what is best for her family. Although in modern day this may seem like the correct and righteous motto (doing what is best for you), this was certainly not the case in Europe during the time period of this play. Juliet, as nearly every woman of nobility, was expected to listen to her parents, and do what is right for the family. Here, however, Juliet goes against this overarching idea and pretends to die for Romeo, making a sacrifice for a boy she had only met just a few days ago. In this play, water is certainly seen as thicker than blood.

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  19. alekhya

    Here is the vial. What if the mixture doesn’t work? Will I have to marry Paris tomorrow?
    No, I would rather kill myself with this knife then marry Paris.
    What if the Friar has given me a deadly poison to get rid of me and the dishonor he brought upon himself by marrying me to Romeo?
    I am fearful, but I also trust him as a man of honesty and holiness.
    But what if I wake up inside the tomb before Romeo comes? Will I suffocate in the vault which has no openings for air to flow? If I do survive will I go mad, the horrors of the tomb overtaking me?
    In the vault lies ancestral bones and Tybalt’s freshly buried body-will their angry spirits come out at night and scream at me? Will I, driven by my fear, go into hysteria and beat my self with my ancestors bones?
    Is that Tybalt’s ghost I see, searching for Romeo who stabbed him with his sword? Stay Tybalt! I drink to thee, Romeo!

    As the plot advancing we begin to see changes in Juliet’s character. At the beginning of the tragedy Juliet was very reserved and polite and had a very clear head. She was portrayed as a very composed figure who would also follow her parents’ word. Only two days have passed and she is now taking drugs, married a man she met a day ago, and speaks of people rising from their graves to drive her mad. Here we can see the change her relationship with Romeo has brought upon her. Based on their dialogues we can see that Juliet’s parent are very distant from their only daughter and the deepest relationship Juliet has is her connection with Nurse. So for her to be part of relationship, Juliet is guarding it very closely and is taking precautions in ensuring it lasts, prompting her to speak up and take action.

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  20. willowm

    Come, vial.
    What if this mixture doesn’t work?
    Am I to be married tomorrow morning then?
    No, no: I will prevent that by all means, even with death.

    (Laying down dagger)

    What if the friar gave me poison to kill me,
    To avoid the risk of being dishonored for marring me and Romeo?
    I fear the possibility, and yet, I doubt he would do such a thing, being a holy man.
    What if when I am put into the tomb Romeo is not there when I wake up?
    That’s another fearful point!
    Will I not be suffocated in the vault
    Before Romeo comes for me?
    Or, if I liv, I will never forget the horrible night in the tomb surrounded by death,
    Together with the terror of the place-
    As in a vault, an ancient space,
    Where for these many years, the bones
    Of all my ancestors are packed:
    Where the just-married Tybalt lies,
    At some hours in the night spirits come in great numbers and shriek;
    Will I go insane at the sight and beat myself to death with an ancestor’s bone for mercy?
    Oh look! I think I see Tybalt’s ghost
    Seeking out Romeo who did stab him: Stay, Tybalt!
    Romeo be at the tomb when I wake, for I drink this for you.
    (She falls upon the bed, within the curtains.)

    This speech clearly shows Juliet’s love and devotion to Romeo. Not only is her love stronger, but she is stronger in the sense that she will stick up for herself and take things into her own hands. In the beginning of the play she was sending the nurse to give Romeo messages and wait for him to come to her. Now, Romeo is banished and others might say their situation was out of her hands, but instead of giving up and marrying Paris, she creates a dangerous plan in order to get Romeo back, even though if the plan does not work the consequences will be severe.

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  21. eshap

    Come, vial
    What if this potion fails to provide the service it intends to?
    Will I have to be married to Paris in the morning?
    [She takes out her knife and puts it down beside her.]
    No, but if it fails, this knife will complete my desire. I will rest here.
    What if the Friar had somehow inserted poison into the mixture
    Intending to put me to death
    For fear that this marriage would he be shamed
    For it was he that married me to Romeo?
    I fear that it is poison. Yet, it is likely it is not,
    For he has always been a holy man and proved he was so.
    What if, when I am located within the tomb,
    I awaken prior to Romeo’s time
    To claim me as his wife? That is a very horrifying idea.
    Will I not be suppressed inside the vault,
    Where I will be unable to breathe in fresh air,
    And die in there, before Romeo has come to see me as his?
    Or, should I stay alive, it would not be likely that
    The terrible thoughts of death and night,
    Combined with the terror of the tomb-
    As in the burial chamber, an ancient place of death
    Where bones have piled up for centuries
    Have been collected of my previous ancestors;
    Where Tybalt has been laid, and not enough time has passed after his death,
    Lies decaying in his grave, where, as they say,
    At some point through the night do spirits stay back-
    Alas, alas, it is unlikely that I,
    Waking up too early, with the foul scents of the tomb,
    And screeches of mandrakes being pulled from the ground,
    That, those being alive, hearing the shrieks, drive themselves to insanity-
    Or, if I do wake, I will not be distressed,
    Surrounded by my greatest fears,
    And will play with the bones of my previous ancestors,
    And remove the decaying Tybalt from his grave,
    And, throughout the madness, with a kinsman’s bone,
    Using it as a club, I will pound my brain so that it becomes useless?
    Oh look, I think I have begun to see Tybalt’s ghost forming
    Searching for Romeo who did kill him
    Using the tip of a sword! Wait a bit, Tybalt, don’t kill him yet!
    Romeo, Romeo, Romeo! Here is the vial I will drink. I drink for you.
    [She drinks and falls upon her bed within the curtains.]

    Throughout this excerpt, Juliet has listed all of her fears that relate not to her well-being, but of her relation with Romeo. Juliet fears if she has to marry Paris, should the potion not work at all. If she does, then she commits a sin, being married to two men. However, she isn’t worried about that. Juliet’s worried about betraying Romeo by marrying someone else. Furthermore, if the potion kills her instead of keeping her alive for forty-two hours, Juliet will no longer be able to see Romeo. Her greatest fear, in reality, is not death or marrying Paris, it’s being separated from Romeo. For example, Juliet states how if she awaken before Romeo’s arrival, the foul air inside the vault could ultimately kill her. But, again, that is not worst problem. In her eyes, it is being without Romeo that causes her so much pain.

    In a way, Juliet’s desire to be with Romeo is similar to Romeo’s previous longing for Rosaline. When Romeo was in love with Rosaline, all he wanted to do was be with her, and have her fall in love with him. As he could not, Romeo was filled with constant sorrow of being without a love. In Juliet’s case, she cannot stand to be without Romeo. Everything she says somehow has something to do with Romeo, even when talking to Paris. Knowing that Romeo has been banished and that she can’t see him, Juliet is heartbroken. She goes as far as saying she would rather kill herself than defy Romeo in their marriage.

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  22. Kat

    “Come, vial.
    What if this mixture do not work at all?
    Shall I be married then to-morrow morning?
    No, no: this shall forbid it: lie thou there.
    (Laying down her dagger)”

    In this part of he speech Juliet has not yet taken the vial. She does not yet know what will happen, and she id pondering wether or not to drink it. Juliet knows that this may not work. However she feels the consequences of not trying this are to great. Juliwt is scared that tommorow she will be married to Paris. That is why she takes out the dagger. If the friars plan does not work, she will kill herself so that she does not have to marry someone that is not Paris.

    “What if it be a poison, which the friar
    Subtly hath minister’d to have me dead,
    Lest in this marriage he should be dishonour’d,
    Because he married me before to Romeo?
    I fear it is: and yet, methinks, it should not,
    For he hath still been tried a holy man.”

    In this passage we see Juliet doubting the Friar himself. She is wondering if the vial will kill her. She does not know what is in this vial and does not know whether or not it is deadly. Juliet thinks that the Friar’s reasons to kill her would be so that he does not have to marry her twice. Being married to multiple people is dishonorable. The Friar may not have wanted to let this happen, so he could be trying to kill her. However Juliet puts this theory down, by realizing that the Friar is a holy, and good man who would not try to hurt someone.

    “How if, when I am laid into the tomb,
    I wake before the time that Romeo
    Come to redeem me? there’s a fearful point!
    Shall I not, then, be stifled in the vault,
    To whose foul mouth no healthsome air breathes in,
    And there die strangled ere my Romeo comes?”

    Now Juliet is scared, she is scared that she will die. However she thinks that the plan will work except for the vial. She thinks that she will wake up too soon, not to be caught, but to be trapped. Juliet is afraid of the tomb, she thinks she will breathe in the air there and die. In this section she doubts Romeo and the part of the plan that he is involved with. She may not be doing it on purpose, but she is afraid that Romeo will not save her. She thinks that it is a possibility that Romeo will not succeed and he will come to the crypt to find that she is actually dead. This frightens Juliet because it could be taken to mean many things. It could mean that the Friar failed. If he gave her a vial that did not last. It could mean that Romeo failed. If he doesn’t get there in time to save her he lets her die. Juliet would not want this to happen because it means that her amazing, perfect lover is not as amazing as she thought. The third possibility is that Juliet is scared her death could be her fault. She might feel responsible for taking the vial instead running away, or not getting married. If Romeo dies Juliet will feel responsible. In this section I feel that she is also considering the consequences and who cause the terrible events to happen.

    “Or, if I live, is it not very like,
    The horrible conceit of death and night,
    Together with the terror of the place,–
    As in a vault, an ancient receptacle,
    Where, for these many hundred years, the bones
    Of all my buried ancestors are packed:
    Where bloody Tybalt, yet but green in earth,
    Lies festering in his shroud; where, as they say,
    At some hours in the night spirits resort;–
    Alack, alack, is it not like that I,
    So early waking, what with loathsome smells,
    And shrieks like mandrakes’ torn out of the earth,
    That living mortals, hearing them, run mad:–
    O, if I wake, shall I not be distraught,
    Environed with all these hideous fears?
    And madly play with my forefather’s joints?
    And pluck the mangled Tybalt from his shroud?
    And, in this rage, with some great kinsman’s bone,
    As with a club, dash out my desperate brains?
    O, look! methinks I see my cousin’s ghost
    Seeking out Romeo, that did spit his body
    Upon a rapier’s point: stay, Tybalt, stay!”

    In this long passage Juliet is once again doubting that the vial will keep her “dead” long enough. However instead of being afraid that she will be killed in the tomb, she is more afraid that she will live while in the tomb. She does not want to be among her dead relatives. She says that she is afraid she will hear their tortured cries, and wails. She is afraid that Tybalt will be near by, and that he will come back and hurt her as punishment. This part is interesting because Juliet fears being alive. She knows that if this plan works she will no longer be a Capulet. So if she is alive and awake in the tomb she will be among dead bodies of people that are no longer he kinsmen. She is afraid that she will be attacked because she betrayed the Capulet family, for a Montague.

    “Romeo, I come! this do I drink to thee.
    (She falls upon her bed, within the curtains.)”

    In this short couple of lines we see Juliet’s final declaration before finally drinking the vial. Juliet proclaims that she is drinking to and for Romeo. She says this as if this vial will bring her to Romeo and it will fix everything. However when I first read this I saw it as her thinking of Romeo as already dead, and she was joining him. She was unsure if this vial had poison so I thought she was also saying that if she dies, some day they will be reunited in death.

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  23. adam

    Here is the vial
    What if it fails?
    Shall I soon be married?
    Oh no, this won’t allow it.
    What if it is a poison that kills me?
    This marriage should be dishonered
    Because I married Romeo
    I fear, although I shouldn’t
    That when I wake, Romeo won’t be there
    I can get stuck there and die myself
    Living doesn’t seem too likely
    The horrible events that may occur
    Aim the terror of the night
    And live in a vault with all the past death
    Oh how horrible that would be
    If I do wake, will it work out?
    Will i survive ?
    I hope it is not miserable
    My cousins ghost, looking for Romeo
    I am doing it for Romeo

    This shows the commitment they have to eachother and how much they will go through to be with eachother. They will take risks for eachother. It also shows the fear Juliet has, rightfully so, as it is very possible something doesn’t go as planned. She will do anything it takes not to be with Paris and not upset her father, even if it means drugs, and being dead for 2 days.

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  24. margauxc

    The vial lies here,
    Yet will it suffice?
    Am I to be wedded on the morrow?
    No, no: it shall be prevented: here must I lay this dagger.
    What if the friar’s remedy is meant for death?
    Does he fear dishonor, knowing this marriage
    Is disgraced, after he wed me to Romeo?
    I fear this remedy may be poison, and yet
    It cannot possibly be, for he is to be trusted as a holy man.
    What if I am to wake before Romeo arrives?
    Will I not fall victim to suffocation,
    When there lies no healthy air to breathe in this tomb?
    And if death comes before my Romeo?
    Or, what if I live and wake to find,
    That I am entombed by both taunting death and fearsome night?
    In this tomb will lie ancient bones of ancestors,
    As well as Tybalt’s corpse- still fresh, still rotting!
    Some speak of phantoms which haunt tombs in the course of night…
    I fear that if I am to wake too early,
    I shall have to endure abhorrent odors and roaring cries,
    Which drive the living to insanity.
    -And will I go insane, if too early I wake,
    Surrounded by these daunting terrors?
    And what if I am to play with the bones of my ancestors?
    And disrupt the mangled Tybalt from his slumber?
    And, in my fervor, die at my own hand,
    Using one of my kinsman’s bones?
    Alas! I can see my cousin’s spirit
    Searching for the Romeo which had slain him
    Upon a rapier’s point: Tybalt, defer!
    Romeo, I draw near! In your name shall I drink.

    The duration of Juliet’s “screen” time is a significant development of her character, though primarily, one could argue that essentially, the most notable dynamic aspect of Juliet’s character is her transition between a damsel-in-distress to a more prominent main character. Initially, throughout the first four and a half scenes of Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet”- Juliet is merely an object of passion and lust for Paris. Due to the brief monologue given by Lord Capulet, the audience is led to believe that a young, naive child is all that there is to Juliet’s character. (In fact, later on, the audience certainly witnesses that Juliet does convey naivety and youth in most of her actions). Yet, overtime, as her interactions with Romeo start to frequent the plot, Juliet displays a considerable amount of knowledge pertaining to what she assumes to be love. She becomes less interested in her duties as a Capulet and more invested in her duties as a lover. The complexity of her character is further developed after Act III, scene v- where we see Juliet deal several phrases of double-meaning- which only asserts that Juliet has a sense of wit (an attribute which is demonstrated during her first interaction with Romeo in Act I, scene v). Act III, scene v emphasizes just a bit of a growing independence that Juliet is accumulating- yet this independent nature is diffused during her “Come, vial.” speech during Act IV, scene iii. (Her actions do convey independence from her parents, yet her dependence on knowing Romeo is coming to rescue her from the tomb demotes her to yet another damsel-in-distress). As mentioned before, as Juliet’s character gains more complexity, she earns more “screen” time.

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  25. laurena2

    This vial
    What if the mixture does not work?
    Will I have to marry paris tomorrow
    No, no: This mixture will work and I will lay here
    What if it is a poison
    That the friar made to kill me,
    Then, he will be dishonored
    Because he already married me to Romeo?
    I fear this potion, but he does not,
    The friar is a holy man.
    What if when I lay in the tomb
    I wake before Romeo comes?
    I am very fearful!
    Then I will suffocate in the vault
    And then die before Romeo comes?
    Or if I live, it is not very likely
    The scary death and night
    Together, with the terror of the vault
    The vault, an ancient place
    For hundreds of years, the bones
    Of all my dead ancestors are here:
    Where tybalt lies, it is green and earthy
    Lies in shroud, where they say
    Sometimes during the night spirits come out
    Ahh, ahh, it is not like I
    Wake with these terrible smells
    And shriek loudly
    The living hears them running about
    O, if I wake I will be distraught
    Filled with all these fears
    And anger my father?
    Or dishonor Tybalt in his shroud?
    And in all his madness,
    With a club, smash out my brains?
    Oh! I think I see my cousin’s ghost
    Seeking out Romeo, the man who killed him
    I will say: “stay, Tybalt, stay”
    Romeo, I come! I drink this for you.

    Over the course of the play, Juliet has broken out of her shell. In the beginning she barely talked, however, now, she is fully expressing her feelings and always says what she believes. Also, Juliet used to be very innocent , like every young girl. Now she is beginning to grow up and heavily considered death in order to stay with Romeo. We see this dramatic change from a young girl to young lady just over the course of a few days. Although she is more stubborn, Juliet is now fighting for what she believes is right.

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