May 12 2017

I’ll not be forsworn.

Please read Romeo and Juliet, Act III, scenes iv and v.

Then, please paraphrase and analyze Capulet’s speech below.   In your analysis, please focus on the following three elements: characterization, plot development, and theme.

  • What do we understand about Capulet’s character or personality from this speech?
  • How do you think his character and this speech are likely to affect the plot of the play?
  • How does this speech add to your understanding of the themes and underlying messages of this play?

As always, be sure to follow the rules of standard English and comment on at least one other response in this thread.

God’s bread! it makes me mad:
Day, night, hour, tide, time, work, play,
Alone, in company, still my care hath been
To have her match’d: and having now provided
A gentleman of noble parentage,
Of fair demesnes, youthful, and nobly train’d,
Stuff’d, as they say, with honourable parts,
Proportion’d as one’s thought would wish a man;
And then to have a wretched puling fool,
A whining mammet, in her fortune’s tender,
To answer ‘I’ll not wed; I cannot love,
I am too young; I pray you, pardon me.’
But, as you will not wed, I’ll pardon you:
Graze where you will you shall not house with me:
Look to’t, think on’t, I do not use to jest.
Thursday is near; lay hand on heart, advise:
An you be mine, I’ll give you to my friend;
And you be not, hang, beg, starve, die in the streets,
For, by my soul, I’ll ne’er acknowledge thee,
Nor what is mine shall never do thee good:
Trust to’t, bethink you; I’ll not be forsworn.

R&J blog #14


Copyright © 2016. All rights reserved.

Posted May 12, 2017 by equinson in category Romeo and Juliet

31 thoughts on “I’ll not be forsworn.

  1. Toa Neil

    “God’s bread! it makes me mad:
    Day, night, hour, tide, time, work, play,
    Alone, in company, still my care hath been
    To have her match’d: and having now provided
    A gentleman of noble parentage,
    Of fair demesnes, youthful, and nobly train’d,
    Stuff’d, as they say, with honourable parts,
    Proportion’d as one’s thought would wish a man;
    And then to have a wretched puling fool,
    A whining mammet, in her fortune’s tender,
    To answer ‘I’ll not wed; I cannot love,
    I am too young; I pray you, pardon me.’
    But, as you will not wed, I’ll pardon you:
    Graze where you will you shall not house with me:
    Look to’t, think on’t, I do not use to jest.
    Thursday is near; lay hand on heart, advise:
    An you be mine, I’ll give you to my friend;
    And you be not, hang, beg, starve, die in the streets,
    For, by my soul, I’ll ne’er acknowledge thee,
    Nor what is mine shall never do thee good:
    Trust to’t, bethink you; I’ll not be forsworn.”

    My analysis of this speech is that Capulet is at his breaking point. He is in trouble, his nephew is dead and his daughter is overly rebellious. I think he will be the reason for later important events.

    Reply
  2. sofiad1

    God’s gifts! It makes me mad! During any time whilst you do anything, Alone, with others, still, I cared for her, To be matched with someone, and now having provided A gentleman of a good family,
    Of good land, young, and well mannered,
    Filled with a good heart,
    As large as one would want a man,
    And then to have someone so stupid,
    A whining baby, in her good fortune,
    To say ‘I’ll not wed; I cannot love,
    I am too young; I pray you, pardon me.’
    But, as you won’t wed, I’ll pardon you:
    Go where you will you will be thrown out of my house:
    Look to it, think well of it, I do not joke.
    Thursday is close; think deeply upon it:
    And you are mine, I’ll marry you off to my friend;
    And you won’t be dead on the streets,
    For, by my soul, I’ll won’t acknowledge thee,
    No, what is mine shall never be given to you:
    Trust in it, to think you; I’ll not be taken lightly.

    In this, we cleary see Capulet’s character changing. At the beginning of the play, he was acting very differently from a father of this time period. He told Paris to woo Juliet because he didn’t want to force love upon her. Now, he is forcing her to marry Paris, becasue he is sick of all this foolishness.

    Reply
  3. charlottes

    “God’s bread! It angers me
    Day, night, hour, tide, time, work, play
    Alone and with others, I cared so much for her
    And longed to match her up; and now I’ve found
    A man of excellent ancestry
    Of a good area, young and courteous
    Packed in with honorable parts
    He is one’s thought of a picture perfect man,
    Compared to a pathetic idiot
    A whimpering baby, in the good fortune
    To reply; “I cannot get married, for I cannot love
    I am still too young, I beg you, pardon me”
    But as you reject getting married, I’ll pardon you:
    Go where you wish, because you will be thrown out of this house
    And this is simply not a joke
    Thursday is close, so think about it
    You are still mine, you will marry that gentleman
    And you won’t be a beggar and die alone on the streets
    For my soul, I will never acknowledge you
    Whatever is mine you will never receive
    Trust it and think to yourself – I will not be ignored.”

    In this scene, Capulet has completely lost it and is letting out all of his anger on Juliet. His point is he has set up this marriage with Paris, and Juliet doesn’t want to get married to him. Capulet does not want to be humiliated and doesn’t want Paris to be humiliated, so he threatens to disown Juliet and cast away the only life she has ever known. He will allow her to die slowly on the streets and never look her in the eye again. She won’t be treated the same. He is sick of Juliet’s craziness and basically forces her to marry Paris or face further consequences.

    Reply
  4. ilyssal

    God’s bread! It causes me anger:
    Day, night, hour, tide, time, work, play,
    All lonely, but in this company
    To have my daughter matched up with
    A boy with royal parents,
    Proportioned as a man’s wish
    And for her
    To answer ‘I’ll not wed; I cannot love,
    I am too young; I pray you, pardon me.’
    But, as you will not wed, I’ll pardon you:
    If not
    An you be mine, I’ll give you to my friend;
    And you be not, hang, beg, starve, die in the streets,
    For, by my soul, I’ll never understand your existence
    My stuff will never be yours.

    From Capulet’s speech, we can understand that he has harsh feelings towards his daughter’s relationship with a Montague. We can see that he has an aggressive personality, and he is very protective over Juliet. He threatens to disown her if she even dares to marry Romeo, from their rival family. In this time period, it was not uncommon for girls to be abused by their fathers if they did not obey marriage rules. Juliet would have likely been hurt physically as well.

    Reply
  5. tarika1

    God’s bread makes me furious!
    Day, night, hour, tide, time, work, play,
    I have always cared for you,
    I arranged her marriage with,
    A gentleman of honor and a respectful name,
    Of good property, youthful, and nobly trained,
    Stuff’d, as they say, with honourable parts,
    A dream man!
    And then to have a whining fool
    A whining doll, in her mind,
    To answer “I do not want to marry him, I cannot love
    I am too young; excuse me”
    If you will not marry him, I’ll excuse you!
    You shall not stay in our house
    Look on it, Think on it, I am not joking.
    Thursday is near; lay hand on heart, I advise
    You are mine, I will give you to Paris
    Without me, you will starve and live on the streets
    I will not even acknowledge you
    You cannot have any of my possessions
    Think about this, I am not joking.

    In this scene we truly see Capulets character. In the dance seen where Tybalt saw Romeo at the Capulet party, he doesn’t really care. But now where Romeo and Juliet have developed a closer relationship and have married, he lets out all his anger to Juliet. He even kicks her out of the household just because she refuses to marry Paris. I found this strange because he asked Juliet if she wanted to marry Paris and now he is forcing her too. This shows readers that Paris does not like people to go back on their word.

    Reply
    1. francescaa

      It seemed so sudden for Capulet to suddenly demand Juliet to marry Paris after Tybalt’s death. Is it because Paris is becoming impatient? Or does Capulet want to lighten the mood after the death of Tybalt?

      Reply
  6. caias1

    God’s bread! It makes me mad!
    All day, night, hour, tide, time, work, play, in company and alone,
    My only priority has been to find a match for her.
    Now I have given her a husband from a good family, has good looks, is young, and is well educated; he has all good qualities.
    A man that haunts any girl’s dreams!
    And then this stupid, whining girl says,
    “I will not get married. I’m to young for this, please excuse me.”
    If you do not get married, then you can starve and die on the streets for all I care.
    Think about it, because I am not joking.
    Get married, or you are gone and I am not taking you back.

    In this scene, Capulet’s opinions on Juliet getting married have drastically changed. The first time Paris proposes a marriage to Juliet, Capulet says that she is too young, and that her approval is a big part of the decision. Now, he is screaming at Juliet to either get married or he will kick her out without anything. This tells readers something about his personality, that he is as unpredictable as Mercutio was. Originally, he truly cared about Juliet’s opinion on Paris, but in this scene he has switched from a caring father to one who does not really care about his daughter either way. This scene will probably be part of the influences that caused Juliet to commit suicide. It also adds to the theme that women in these times were really not respected at all.

    Reply
  7. maddy

    Within this dialogue, Capulet’s disposition is further conveyed. He is depicted to be contradictory in accordance to his previous stance on Juliet being wedded. The initial conversation between Capulet and Paris in Act One portrayed Capulet in an exceedingly disparate manner. One may have regarded him to be a benevolent, lenient father upon perusing of his belief that ultimately, Juliet is to decide whom she will wed and when she will wed. The predominance of men during the Elizabethan era would not have concurred with such a belief. Rather, fathers typically dictated their daughters’ marriages without regarding their views toward the matter. Capulet stated, “My will to her consent is but a part; / An she agree, within her scope of choice / Lies my consent and fair according voice.” However, Capulet’s words in the fifth scene of Act Three controvert otherwise. He was far from content upon hearing of Juliet not desiring to wed Paris. So infuriated was Capulet by this disclosure, he threatened to banish her, and stated that he would be unbothered by such an occurrence. One may regard these excerpted lines of his to be particularly grievous: “…hang, beg, starve, die in the streets, / For, by my soul, I’ll ne’er acknowledge thee, / Nor what is mine shall never do thee good.” It can be concluded from this contradiction that Capulet is of a fickle nature; kind-hearted one moment, brutal the next. This bears resemblance to Friar Lawrence’s dialogue in the third scene of the Second Act, which was analyzed and rephrased as a previous blog assignment. This dialogue comprises Friar Lawrence addressing Romeo’s newfound love for a woman other than Rosaline, and his request to be wedded to her. The friar expressed his beliefs of how erratically men behaved in accordance to love. Romeo loved Rosaline so dearly, and constantly wallowed due to this love being unrequited. Shortly subsequent, Romeo became infatuated with Juliet, and consequently abandoned his emotions for Rosaline. Friar Lawrence thus told Romeo that he was being capricious, and that he had never truly loved Rosaline. One of Friar Lawrence’s arguably most prominent lines [from this dialogue] is, “Women may fall when there’s no strength in men.” An interpretation of this is, “Women cannot be expected as devoted when men themselves are so variable in character.” It is intriguing how likewise Romeo, Capulet is fickle as well. Romeo was so sure of his emotions for Rosaline, yet then became enamored by Juliet, and acted upon his newfound desire to court her. Capulet was unwavering when he told Paris of his regards pertaining to Juliet wedding him, yet his beliefs greatly differed when he reacted to Juliet’s regards.

    Reply
  8. maddy

    Oh, how this enrages me so!
    The predominance of my exertions, no matter the circumstance,
    Have resolutely been devoted
    To the sake of attaining her a spouse: and upon this sake being fulfilled,
    Upon my disclosure of there being a suitable gentleman for her to wed,
    Who is reputable and handsome as well as intelligent and young,
    Lavish with astounding attributes,
    A man thought to be regarded as desirable in the eyes of any woman;
    And for there to be a wretched, dejected clod,
    Behaving likewise a grousing marionette, in her fortunate state,
    To proclaim, “I shall not wed; I cannot love,
    For I am too young; I ask of you, pardon me.”
    Well, if you shall not wed, my pardonings are to be affirmed as such:
    Dine wherever you desire; you shall not be welcomed to do so in this household:
    Contemplate my affirmations, for I am not jesting.
    Thursday is approaching. Acquire my advice to heart and attend to it:
    If you acquit yourself as my daughter, I shall have you wedded to my acquaintance;
    And if you do not behave as such, beg, starve, die in the streets,
    By my soul, I shall never acknowledge you then,
    And you will be devoid of all that I possess:
    Do not be repudiating. I advise you to be heedful of this. My promises are neither embellished nor untrue.

    Reply
  9. francescaa

    Oh how this angers me
    Day, night, hour, tide, work, play
    I have always cared for you
    And now I have matched you with a respectable man
    A man who is not only handsome, but comes from a good family
    Honorable in every way
    With every quality one could wish for
    And then to have a whining daughter
    Who cries when her future is being determined
    To say “ I’ll not wed; I cannot love,
    I am too young….
    If you don’t wed you will leave this house
    Thursday is near and I advise you
    You will go and marry my friend
    Or else you will starve in the streets
    For i will forget about you
    Whatever money I have you will not get
    Believe me, I do not lie.

    From this speech, my feelings for Capulet have completely changed. In the beginning of the play Capulet seemed to be a nice man, who wanted to best for his daughter. When Paris asked him if he could marry Juliet, Capulet reinforced the fact that it ultimately comes down to what makes Juliet happy. However, after reading this speech the reader learns otherwise. Now Capulet is forcing Juliet to marry Paris. When Juliet tells her father that her heart isn’t with Paris, he goes ballistic. Capulet threatens if she doesn’t marry Paris on Thursday, he will kick her out of the house; and basically “feed her to the wolves.” This puts Juliet in a serious predicament, because if her parents find out that her and Romeo are married, Capulet will probably harm her.

    As for Juliet, we also see a change in her character. In the beginning in the play Juliet is an extremely obedient child. She asks for permission to look at boys and is basically the yes puppet.There wasn’t an instance where she said “no”. However, now Juliet is becoming a bit more rebellious. She tells her father she doesn’t want to get married to Paris. She also got married to Romeo secretly, and had an affair with him. In a span of a day Juliet turned from being a sweet,little, innocent girl to a mischievous child who is keeping a lot of secrets from her parents.

    Reply
    1. avae1

      I agree, like her father, Juliet’s mindset has completely changed within the span of a day. Capulet’s perspective of Juliet’s marriage has quickly altered as well. It seems that many characters in this play are fickle, Mercutio, Romeo, and now Capulet and Juliet. I wonder what these unpredictable emotions have to do with the message of the play?

      Reply
  10. Kat

    Capulet’s speech in this scene is very interesting. Capulet is talking to Juliet and telling her that she must marry Paris. This speech takes place right after Juliet finds out that she is set to marry Paris. Still distraught over Romeo leaving, she does not want to marry Paris. To stop the marriage Juliet says that she is too young, not ready, and not in love with Paris. Capulet however sees that Juliet only has two options. She can marry Paris or not. However if she chooses not to marry Paris, she will be kicked out. Capulet basically says that if she doesn’t marry his friend she will no longer be a Capulet. This reminded me of the balcony scene. In that scene Juliet said that she would no longer want to be a Capulet if it meant she could be with Romeo. This interest me, because I kept thinking that Juliet should just run away with Romeo. I still wonder about this and think about how they seemed so in love with each other. However I think that Juliet doesn’t want to leave her family. This may be another obstacle that Romeo and Juliet will run into with there love.

    Reply
  11. avae1

    Oh, how this angers me.
    Day, night, hour, tide, time, work, play,
    No matter the circumstances my care for her has prevailed.
    I have now matched her with an exquisite man,
    A gentleman of a fine family,
    Youthful and handsome, with fulfilling qualities.
    He is everything one could desire.
    And then to have a wailing fool,
    A whining baby when she is offered so much,
    To answer “I’ll not wed. I cannot love.
    I am too young. I pray you, pardon me.”
    But, if you will not wed, then I’ll grant you permission to leave!
    Go where you want, but you will not live with me.
    Thursday is near, so consider it soon.
    Marry my friend, but if not, you can suffer on the streets,
    I will not care, what’s mine will never be yours again.
    Decide carefully, for my words do not lie.

    From this speech, Capulets’ true personality is conveyed. At the start of the play, Capulets’ attitude towards Juliet’s wedding was very understanding and calm. When Paris originally asked for Juliet’s hand in marriage, Capulet handled the matter by telling him that he feels she is too young, and overall it is Juliet’s decision. He had a level-headed approach and was allowing Juliet to choose her own path, which was uncommon for parents at the time. However, in scene v the reader sees Capulet portrayed as a typical medieval parent.

    Once Juliet denied his request, Capulet became furious and enraged. He threatened to disown her and leave her on the streets to die. This is a drastic change from his response only a day or two before. It is evident that Capulet can have a temper, especially when his demands are not obeyed. He is the authority figure in his household and those who do not listen to him pay the consequences. We as readers have to remind ourselves that Romeo and Juliet are still children, and generally remain under the control of their parents. So as much as they attempt to do so, it is difficult to avoid their parent’s rule. Juliet is Capulets’ only kin, and with Tybalt dead, maintaining the Capulet family lineage is up to her. Surely this is a great amount of pressure and responsibility for one twelve year-old. This pressure could later be the cause of Juliet’s fatal decision. Perhaps she knew she couldn’t keep her marriage a secret forever, so to escape her father’s rage she took her own life.

    Reply
  12. laurena2

    God’s bread! You have caused me rage:
    No matter what time
    I have always cared so much for her
    To find her a husband: And now I have found one
    A gentleman with a royal background
    A man of youth and nobility,
    Filled with much honor,
    The perfect man that everybody looks for
    And then to have a foolish idiot
    Whine about her good fortune
    And answer “I will not marry him, I do not love him”
    I am too young, I hope you will forgive me
    But as you reject the marriage, I will forgive you
    Go where you want, because I will kick you out of my house
    I am very serious
    Thursday is close, so consider the marriage
    And you will still be mine, I will give you a gentleman
    There will be no need to beg and starve on the streets
    For then, I will never care about you
    What is mine will never be yours
    Think, and trust yourself. I refuse to be ignored.

    In this scene, we see that Capulet will no longer let Juliet decide who she is going to marry. He will make the decision and there will be no exceptions. Capulet is unleashing all his feelings and letting Juliet know that if she does not please him, he will no longer care about his once loved daughter. Capulet is beginning to get frustrated with Juliet, realizing that she is not too young and must get married to a noble gentleman soon, or else it will be too late.

    Reply
  13. arihantp1

    God’s bread! How it makes me mad:
    I have spent day, night, hour, tide, time, work, play,
    Caring for her
    Trying to find a match, but now
    A noble man comes along
    From descent parentage
    A man with a good heart, youthful, and nobly train’d
    With honorable parts
    The perfect man
    Only to have my wretched fool of a daughter
    To say “I cannot wed”
    I’ll pardon you:
    But you will not live in this house with me
    Look to it, think about it , I am not joking
    On Thursday I will marry you off to my friend
    And if you don’t, you will be on the streets dying from hunger
    I swear I will never acknowledge you
    What is mine shall never be given to you
    Trust me, I will not be forsworn

    From this speech we can clearly tell that Capulet is mad. He has lost his dear nephew to a Montague, and know his daughter is disobeying him, and refusing to marry. We can also tell that Capulet’s threats are not to be taken lightly, as to the importance of the marriage. Furthermore, Juliet has changed drastically in one day. The obedient girl who wouldn’t even look at a boy without her parent’s permission, married a boy secretly, and is being forced to wed again. Juliet is becoming very rebellious to her parents, but this could have terrible consequences in the future.

    Reply
  14. christophert3

    After reading scene v of Act III, we learn that although Capulet is a loving father who allows his daughter more than usual parents, he is also a very controlling man and if something doesn’t happen the way he wants it to, he makes it happen in that way. The outburst of anger that we see from him reveals this side of him that we never saw in the rest of the play. The speech above is of him “talking”, in his overwhelming anger, to Juliet. He is saying that:
    Oh goodness! It makes me mad:
    My life is always changing around me, but my care for her
    was always to have her married: and having now given her
    a gentleman from a noble family,
    (describes the good traits of Paris)
    and then to having a terrible idiot
    taking advantage of all her good fortune,
    say “I’ll not wed; I cannot love,
    I am too young;I pray pardon me.’
    But, as you will not wed, I’ll pardon you:
    Live where you will, but you won’t live with me:
    Think about this, for I am not joking.
    Thursday is almost here; listen to your heart:
    If you are truly my daughter, come and wed Paris;
    If you aren’t, die, beg starve, die in the streets,
    Because I will never help you,
    And my possession will not be inherited by you:
    Think about it, reflect; I will not take back my words.
    From, what we can see here, Capulet is obviously not happy about her not being thankful of what he is offering her. He doesn’t yet know of her having already wedded and so thinks her ungrateful of all the blessings that have come her way. But we also see that his punishment is complete and utter banishment from his household. He states,
    “And you be not, hang, beg, starve, die in the streets,
    For, by my soul, I’ll ne’er acknowledge thee,
    Nor what is mine shall never do thee good:”
    From this one can see he will no longer care about her well being if she doesn’t marry Paris on Thursday. So he is, unknowingly making her choose between her family or Romeo. A very hard decision. But, if she does choose Romeo and thus cause her parents to shun her, does he forget about what he said when she dies?

    Reply
  15. alexo

    God’s bread! It angers me:
    Any time,
    All alone, my one goal,
    is to find her a husband. And now that I have given one,
    who is good-looking, young, and educated well,
    Stuffed, as they say, with honorable parts,
    A women’s dream of a man-
    And then have this wretched idiot,
    a whining mammet, in sight of fortune,
    To answer “I won’t marry”, ‘I cannot love”,
    “I am too young”, “I pray you, pardon me”-
    But, if you don’t wed, I’ll throw you out.
    Eat where you want, you won’t live here.
    Think about that. I do not joke.
    Thursday is almost here. Lay your hand on your heart, think about what I have said.
    You are mine, I give you to my friend.
    If you won’t be given, you can beg, starve, and die in the streets.
    I swear that I’ll never acknowledge you,
    Nor will I do anything for you.
    Trust me. Bethink you. This promise will not be broken.

    From what we have seen before in the book and from this one scene, we can see how capulet’s thoughts have changed. beforehand, Capulet’s stance on Juliet marrying was that she would only do so when she wanted to. For some reason or another, his stance on this subject has completely changed. he is marrying off Juliet to a man she does not love without her consensus and is threatening to send her off into the streets if she does not marry. I have concluded that Capulet’s ideas have changed since the beginning of the book and should be thought of as a sort of different person from the beginning Capulet.

    As to how this affects the play, I expect this to affect Juliet greatly. She cares and loves her father, and to see him suddenly be so negative towards her is probably something she is not very used to. Along with that, there is an overlying problem to Juliet marrying Paris that Capulet does not know: she’s married to Romeo! As discussed in class, once you marry and have sex the “deal is sealed”. You’re stuck with that person. Juliet cannot tell this information to Capulet because upon gaining this information, Juliet would immediately be thrown out of the household and shunned for the rest of her life. If she does not tell Capulet, marrying Paris would be a sin and she would have to deal with the guilt for the rest of her life and abandon her true love, Romeo.

    However, I don’t think that Juliet is actually going to marry Paris. I suspect that she will take the B plan, and be exiled from the Capulet household. She’ll run away with Romeo, and some kind of unfortunate end will come to the two of them.

    Reply
  16. briannag3

    God it makes me mad!
    All the events happening and all that
    Changes around me, my goal has been
    To have her wed. And now presenting a
    A gentleman of noble parentage,
    An all around good man;
    Rather than a fool,
    Marry only for her wealth,
    To say ‘I’ll not wed; I cannot love,
    I am too young; I pray you, pardon me.’
    But, if you will not wed, I’ll pardon you:
    Live where you choose but it will not be with me:
    Think about it, I am not kidding.
    The wedding day draws near, follow your heart:
    And if you’re my daughter, come to be wed;
    And if you aren’t, hang, beg, starve, die in the streets,
    I swear I will never acknowledge you again,
    All that I have will never be yours.

    In this scene you can clearly see Capulet’s anger. He has set up a marriage between Paris and Juliet for the coming Thursday, but Juliet refuses to be married. He gets furious with her and lets out all his anger, threatening to disown her if she doesn’t agree to be married. However, he still has no idea that Juliet has already been married.

    Reply
  17. ivanl

    God’s bread! It makes me angry
    All the time, no matter where I am
    My job, to have her marry
    And now, I present a gentleman of noble parentage,
    An attractive, working man
    And she says, ‘I’ll not wed; I cannot love,
    I am too young; I pray you, pardon me.’
    But if you do not marry
    I will cast you out
    The wedding is coming, so think on it
    I will not break this promise

    From Capulet’s speech, we can see that he is accustomed to getting things the way that he wants. He threatens his daughter to throw her out and leave her to die on the streets should she not listen to him. I think his character will affect the love between Romeo, Capulet will not allow such a thing to happen under his watch. Going back to when Juliet said she would abandon her family name, I feel like this might be the time that she does just that, since her father will no longer look after her when she refuses the wedding.

    Reply
  18. marinas1

    God’s Bread, it irates me so
    Every day, night, hour, tide, time, work, play
    Alone, in company, still, my care has been
    Solely for you. And now having given
    You a well-known noble gentleman,
    Of fair property, youth, and nobility,
    Filled, as some would say, with extremely moral parts,
    Proportioned as any fair gentleman should be-
    And then, after all of this, to have a wretched fool,
    A whining coward like yourself, in all the good fortune she is offered,
    To answer “I will not wed. I can not love. I am too young. I pray, please forgive me.”
    But, if you do not wed, I will give you permission to leave!
    Go wherever you wish, but you will not stay with me.
    Look to it; think on it. I do not make any jokes.
    Thursday is approaching. Lay a hand on your heart; ponder what I have said.
    And if you be my daughter, I’ll give you to Paris.
    And if you be not, you can live on the streets.
    I swear, I will never acknowledge you if I see you on the streets.
    For, anything that is mine shall never do you any good.
    Trust my words; consider them. I will not change my mind.

    After reading this excerpt, I could fairly say that I could completely see where Capulet was coming from in declaring these words. He has done everything for his child. He raised her, fed her, provided her with a safe home, gave her food and water. He even held back in giving Juliet’s hand to Paris towards the beginning of the play, saying she is his only daughter, and he wants what is best for her. He says “‘And too soon marred are those so early made. Earth hath swallowed all my hopes but she; she’s the hopeful lady of my Earth.'” Now, after all, Capulet has done for her, she simply disregards his words and refuses to marry Paris? She does not even listen to what he has to say. If I were to be Capulet, I would certainly be just as outraged as he. Juliet seems to be unable to listen to Capulet, coming off as quite the greedy young lady.

    Although this may be true, we also do see how drastically Capulet has changed throughout the play. When first talking to Paris at the beginning of the play, he also pronounces “‘But woo her, gentle Paris, get her heart; my will to her consent is but a part. And, she agreed, within her scope of choice lies my consent and fair according to voice.'” Then, he wanted Juliet to fall in love with Paris before he arranged the marriage and wanted Juliet’s consent before following through. Now, however, Capulet simply tells Juliet that she and Paris are getting married, without any of her consent. Then, when Juliet says no, he is outraged, and demands that she marries Paris. This is completely the opposite of what he had intended to do previously, showing his fickleness.

    Something quite interesting about this reading was how Capulet and Lady Capulet are so detached from their daughter. When Juliet says she will not marry Paris, they basically warn her that if she refuses Paris, she will be disowned, dying on the streets of Verona. In this case, Capulet and Lady Capulet are acting like anything but Paris, forcing Juliet into something she does not wish to do. On the other hand, the Nurse acts like a true parent. When Juliet asks her about whether she should marry Paris or not, the Nurse responds like any true parent would; with kindness and affection, looking out for Juliet’s well-being. Here, the Nurse seems like Juliet’s mother, unlike Lady Capulet, who just declares “‘Talk not to me, for I’ll not speak a word. Do as though wilt, for I have done with thee.'”,acting like a dispatched adult who does not want to deal with a bothersome child residing on her doorstep.

    Reply
  19. faithw

    God’s presents anger me
    Day, night, hour, tide, time, work, and play,
    I was devoted to finding her a suitable husband
    Now, I have found a perfect gentleman of great wealth, with wonderful characteristics, and is overall the idea husband for Juliet.
    Instead of being gracious for the lovely Paris, she acts like a wretched whining fool by answering, ‘I’ll not wed; I cannot love, I am too young; I pray you, pardon me.’
    If you refuse to be wed, I will disown you.
    Eat wherever you want, but you are not allowed in my household. I am extremely serious, so I suggest you think about your decision carefully.
    Thursday is coming soon. Place your hand on my heart and listen to my advice.
    If you behave like my daughter, I will marry you to Paris. However, if you do not, you will beg, starve, and die in the streets.
    I vow that I will never acknowledge you nor help you in any way. Trust me, I will never break this promise. Think carefully about your options.

    From this speech, the readers learn a lot about Capulet’s personality. Capulet, unaware of the secret marriage between Romeo and Juliet, wants to marry Juliet and Paris. Because Juliet is already married, she attempts to convince her father to cancel the wedding by claiming she is too young and is incapable of loving. The excuses made by Juliet infuriate her father, Capulet. Capulet’s discourse depicts him to be a strict, quick-tempered man. After Juliet declines his offer, Capulet becomes so enraged that he threatens to disown her.

    Reply
  20. alekhya

    God’s bread! It angers me so
    Every day, night, hour, tide, time, work, play,
    Alone, in company, still my care has always been
    for you: and now that I have found
    A gentleman of noble parentage,
    fair property, youth, and nobility,
    whose behavior is properly that of a gentleman’s,
    with good values and morals.
    And then to have a wretched complaining fool,
    A whining puppet, pampered in her good fortune,
    To say to me ‘I’ll not wed; I cannot love,
    I am too young; I pray you, pardon me.’
    But, since you will not marry Paris, I’ll give you permission to leave this house:
    Go wherever you want, but you shall stay in this house:
    Think about it carefully, I am not joking.
    Thursday is near; lay your hand on your heart, and think carefully:
    If you are my daughter you will marry Paris;
    If you are not my daughter you can go and die in the streets,
    If I see you I wont address you,
    Nothing that belongs to me will ever again be at your aid:
    Think over my words carefully; I won’t change my mind.

    After reading Capulet’s speech to Juliet we see how his feelings towards Juliet have changed from Act I scene ii where he speaks of Juliet with a tender love. When Paris first asks to marry Juliet in scene two after the fight, Capulet says to the young man that the decision rests entirely upon Juliet and that his own consent does not matter as much. “My will to her consent is but a part. And, she agreed, within her scope of choice lies my consent and fair according voice.” In his speech to Juliet in Act III scene v he takes away her ability to choose in the matter of her marriage when he says that she will either marry Paris or cease to be his daughter. Here the decision for Juliet is not whether she would like to wed to Paris but if she would like to live.

    In his speech we can also see a change in the way Capulet sees his only daughter. In act I scene ii he says, “Earth hath swallowed all my hopes but she; she’s the hopeful lady of my earth.” For a man who had claimed Juliet is his only hope just a day ago, Capulet seems to be disgusted by his daughter when she declines his proposal. “And then to have a wretched puling fool, a whining mammet, in her fortune’s tender,” are Capulet’s words when he tells Juliet what he thinks of her decision.

    It was quite strange to see how someone’s opinion and views could change over a single day. Capulet had called Juliet his last hope but now refers to her with terms such as “you green-sickness carrion/you baggage/you tallow face/disobedient wretch/wretched puling fool/whining mammet” I wonder what could be the cause of such a sudden change in heart; could it be Tybalt’s death? Or Romeo’s betrayal? That night Capulet had told Tybalt, Romeo was a well mannered gentle man who, according to the town was of fine proposition, only to have him murder Tybalt later that very night. Could it be that he feels Juliet will also abandon him?

    Reply
    1. eshap

      I agree, Capulet’s change in thoughts is quite drastic. Capulet had always been fond of Juliet from what we have read, however, he takes on a whole new personality when Juliet refuses to marry Paris. He thought that proposing Paris’ marriage would strengthen their bond, but it only did the opposite.

      Reply
  21. margauxc

    God’s bread! It infuriates me:
    Time nor company have never detained my pursuit-
    To find a husband for her has always been
    My sole and utmost care.
    And now, I have found a noble husband,
    Who presents himself with allure, youth, and wisdom,
    He displays desired aspects,
    He is lusted by many-
    And yet this foolish, pettish girl still whines,
    She acts as if she were a querulous puppet,
    Looking upon this prosperous fortunate happening,
    And answering, “I refuse to marry; I know not how to love,
    I’m too young; I beg you to excuse me.”
    Seeing as you will not marry, I do intend to spare you pardon:
    Wander where you must, yet no longer will you be of my house,
    Consider this solemnly, for I am not light of heart.
    Thursday draws near, contemplate my words:
    If you wish to be a Capulet, I will present you to my friend.
    If not, you will find that poverty, hunger, and death awaits.
    And I will swear to henceforth never tend to your needs,
    Place your trust in this, for I will stand by my word.

    Throughout Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet”, Lord Capulet tends to display an interesting set of emotions which range between two entirely different extremities- Kindness and Rage. Initially, Lord Capulet is portrayed to be a fierce and infamous character who takes part of the strife between the Montagues and Capulets. However, a softer side to Capulet is depicted in Act I, scene ii- when he shows mercy to Juliet and attempts to dissuade Paris’ advances. This more compassionate side to Capulet is again featured during Act I, scene v- when Capulet allows Romeo to stay at his feast and later comments how he is far too old to continue his rivalry with Lord Montague. Yet during Act III, scene v, Capulet’s nature is revealed to not be as good-natured as previously thought. His explosiveness towards Juliet conveys that he still is, in fact, the fierce and brutal Capulet, who is not to be crossed. Capulet treats his daughter with the same disposition he most likely would have used with a Montague- emphasizing how significant Juliet’s marriage must be to him. Ensuring her future does not necessarily seem to be his true motive- rather, it seems as if he seeks to ensure the future of his own legacy/name. His words affect the pace of the play, seeing as the audience now knows Juliet has till Thursday to determine her course of action.

    Reply
  22. eshap

    God’s bread, it infuriates me.
    Every day, night, hour, season, time, work, play,
    Alone, in company, my desire has always been
    In the best interest for you. I have now presented
    You a noble gentleman of worthy backgrounds,
    Of fair realms, youthful, and of noble blood,
    Full of, as some would say, of virtuous parts,
    Proportioned as a gentleman of noble heritage should be-
    And then, after all my efforts, to have an ungrateful fool,
    A whining child, in the good fortune she has been given,
    To answer “I will not wed. I cannot love.
    I am too young. I ask of you, excuse me for refusing to accept.”
    But, if you do not agree to wed, I will give you permission to leave!
    Go wherever you please, but you are not allowed to stay with me.
    Look on it; think on it. I am not making any kind of joke.
    Thursday is coming closer. Lay a hand on your heart; consider your options.
    And if you really are my daughter, I will give you away to Paris.
    And if you disobey me, you will soon learn to live on the streets.
    Where, trust me when I say this, you will not be acknowledged by me,
    And where all of what is mine shall never be of any good to you.
    Trust to what I have said; consider my words. I will not be dishonest with my promise.

    In this excerpt, describing Juliet’s future events, has shown a drastic change in Capulet’s thoughts about Juliet’s marriage. At the beginning of the play, Capulet will not allow Paris to marry Juliet without her falling for him. “But saying o’er what I have said before. My child is yet a stranger in the world…Ere we may think her ripe to be a bride.” (lines 7-8 and 11) For this time period, a father letting his daughter choose who she was to be married to was rather strange. In this way, Capulet shows consideration for his daughter’s feelings. However, as we can see in this speech, the change in Capulet’s thoughts have been altered. Now, Capulet is practically forcing Juliet to be married to Paris. After all, he had been the one to raise her from a young child. The least Juliet could do is marry someone who is willing to marry a “wretched puling fool”. Even though Capulet claimed to raise Juliet, it was really the nurse who had raised her, influencing her the most. From this, Juliet still has the right to choose her own marriage. On the other hand, many could see Juliet as being at fault for denying to marry Paris. Paris was a noble gentleman, who was worthy of marrying Juliet. He loved her, and she could always learn to love him. Capulet had made a proper decision for her, choosing someone from the proper family, and someone who would raise Juliet’s status. Juliet could be seen as young lady who only settles for what she wants. For example, there was no convincing her of marrying Paris now that she had married Romeo. Even though there was a slight chance they could be together now that Romeo has been banished.

    On a different note, the other option given to Juliet is quite drastic. Capulet is ready to give up his daughter simply because she did not want to marry Paris. He would gladly leave her out on the streets to live on her own, giving no help whatsoever. As he says this, Lady Capulet says nothing to counter Capulet’s threat. Juliet, in this way, is vulnerable to her parents bidding. She either had to marry Paris, or be separated from her parents. Furthermore, I see the way her parents view Juliet to be interesting. Should she do something honorable, they commend her. But, if Juliet disobeys anything her parents say, whether it be a large or small matter, they are willing to disown her. Capulet and Lady Capulet have no care for their daughter unless she does something commendable.

    Reply
  23. cameronl3

    God’s bread! how furious this makes me:
    Day, night, hour, tide, time, work, play,
    I have always seed so much for you
    Even trying to find you a husband, which I have finally found
    A man of great wealth,
    Of a very well-mannered family
    Filled with only great traits,
    With traits people wish they could have,
    And then to have an uneducated fool,
    An annoying brat in her fortunes tender,
    To say “I will not marry, for I cannot love,
    I am far too young, I am sorry.”
    But if you do not marry, I’ll leave you:
    As you will not be part of my household:
    Look forward to it, I do not kid.
    Thursday is nearby, truly think about it:
    You will still be mine, if you marry my friend;
    And you won’t be miserable on the streets,
    For I will not acknowledge you,
    What is mine shall never been given to you:
    Trust in what I say to you. Do not take me as a joke.

    As it is shown from what Capulet is exclaiming to Juliet in scene 5, he is very agitated at the fact Juliet does not want to marry Paris. What he does not understand is she had already married Romeo, but if he finds this out, he would be even more angered. As he goes on, he says that she has the choice to marry him and live happy, or not, and live miserably on the streets of Verona. This is very upsetting, especially coming from her own father.

    Reply
  24. Tyler Newby

    God’s bread! it makes me mad:
    Day, night, hour, tide, time, work, play,
    I have always been there for you
    And I matched you with an honorable gentleman
    Of royal descent and noble ways
    Who is desirable and handsome
    Only to have a miserable wretch say
    ‘I’ll not wed; I cannot love,
    I am too young; I pray you, pardon me.’
    If you do not marry this man I have matched you with
    I will cast you out of my house
    And you will die on the streets.

    In this paragraph, Capulet lost his patience with Juliet because she refused to marry Paris.  He says that he had cared for her for her entire life, so the least she could do is marry the man he matched her with.  Capulet becomes very angry and says that if Juliet does not marry Paris, he will cast her out on the streets.

    Reply
  25. willowm

    God’s bread! it makes me mad:
    I’ve spent day, night, hour, tide, time, work, play
    trying to find her a suitable husband: and now that I have provided
    A gentleman with a noble parentage,
    That is wealthy and youthful,
    Having honorable qualities,
    And then to have a wretched wailing fool,
    A whining puppet in her fortune’s tender,
    To answer ‘I’ll not wed; I cannot love,
    I am too young: I pray you, pardon me.’
    But if you do not marry I will kick you out:
    Go wherever you want but you won’t live with me:
    Think about it, I wouldn’t joke about this.
    Thursday is coming up; marry him,
    And you will still be mine,
    I will not throw you out in the streets to beg or starve, or die,
    For I’ll never acknowledge you,
    Nor will you inherit anything from me:
    Trust me, I will not change my mind or swear falsely.

    In this raging speech from Capulet to Juliet we learn he is hard and unforgiving. Based on this speech we learn he will never forgive Juliet for marrying Romeo without permission once he finds out. He would most likely banish her from the household and she will have no where to stay since Romeo is in the neighboring town.

    Reply
  26. George

    God’s bread! it makes me mad:
    Day, night, hour, tide, time, work, play,
    Alone, in company, still my care hath been
    To have her match’d: and having now provided
    A gentleman of noble parentage,
    Of fair demesnes, youthful, and nobly train’d,
    Stuff’d, as they say, with honourable parts,
    Proportion’d as one’s thought would wish a man;
    And then to have a wretched puling fool,
    A whining mammet, in her fortune’s tender,
    To answer ‘I’ll not wed; I cannot love,
    I am too young; I pray you, pardon me.’
    But, as you will not wed, I’ll pardon you:
    Graze where you will you shall not house with me:
    Look to’t, think on’t, I do not use to jest.
    Thursday is near; lay hand on heart, advise:
    An you be mine, I’ll give you to my friend;
    And you be not, hang, beg, starve, die in the streets,
    For, by my soul, I’ll ne’er acknowledge thee,
    Nor what is mine shall never do thee good:
    Trust to’t, bethink you; I’ll not be forsworn.

    We see a huge character change of Capulet fro the beginning to now. He said at the beginning “her consent was but a part” however now he is forcing her to marry Paris. He even goes so far as to say that if she doesnt that he will let her die in the streets. This huge character change will probably be hugely important for the plot.

    Reply
  27. Rebecca F

    This speech reveals a great deal about Capulet’s character. One thing that it reveals is that, like Mercutio was, he can be capricious. In the beginning of the play, when Count Pparis asks to marry Juliet, Capulet tells him, “My will to her consent is but a part.” Yet now, Capulet tells Juliet that if she does not marry Paris, he will disown her and leave her on the streets. Capulet even threatens to drag her to the altar as criminals were dragged to their execution. This is a vast change from the father who did not want his daughter to be married away too young, lest she become bitter and cynical.

    Reply
  28. adam

    Oh Gosh! How it makes me angry!
    All the time it bothers me
    You are always my top priority
    Even when dinding a husband for you, which is done
    A great man from a great family
    Who everyone likes
    Full of marvelous features
    The perfect man for anyone
    But she complains
    She does not want to marry
    She is too young, and begs for pardon
    I will grant you pardon
    If only you no longer live under our roof
    And rethink your decision
    Get advice and choose by Thursday
    And you can be married to a great person
    And have a healthy future
    Make the right choice
    If not, you are doing no good
    Trust me and him, don’t regret it.

    This shows that Capulet cares about Juliet and wants the best for her, and needs her to marry Paris, but she denies. He is now furious with her and wants her to be with him or else he will basically disown her. He doesn’t know that she is with Romeo, and that she is obligated to him and nobody else.
    She is trying to make excuses for not getting married, but she must be disowned if she doesn’t marry Paris. If she tells Capulet the truth, it will be even worse. One may think it is possible she too gets kicked out of Verona and pairs with Romeo.

    Reply

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