March 17 2017

Just standing on the Radley porch was enough.

Please re-read the following passage from the end of To Kill a Mockingbird.  Then analyze

  • What is the main purpose of the passage?
  • How does Harper Lee advance this purpose through the use one literary element or technique:
    • setting, imagery, metaphor, alliteration, point of view, mood, tone, diction (word choice), juxtaposition, symbolism, etc.
  • Is she successful?  Why or why not?

***

I turned to go home. Street lights winked down the street all the way to town. I had never seen our neighborhood from this angle.  There were Miss Maudie’s, Miss Stephanie’s- there was our house, I could see the porch swing- Miss Rachel’s house was beyond us, plainly visible. I could even see Mrs. Dubose’s.

I looked behind me. To the left of the brown door was a long shuttered window. I walked to it, stood in front of it, and turned around. In daylight, I thought, you could see to the post office corner.

Daylight… in my mind, the night faded. It was daytime and the neighborhood was busy. Miss Stephanie Crawford crossed the street to tell the latest to Miss Rachel.  Miss Maudie bent over her azaleas.  It was summertime, and two children scampered down the sidewalk toward a man approaching in the distance. The man waved, and the children raced each other to him.

It was still summertime, and the children came closer. A boy trudged down the sidewalk dragging a fishing pole behind him. A man stood waiting with his hands on his hips. Summertime, and his children played in the front yard with their friend, enacting a strange little drama of their own invention.

It was fall, and his children fought on the sidewalk in front of Mrs. Dubose’s. The boy helped his sister to her feet, and they made their way home. Fall, and his children trotted to and fro around the corner, the day’s woes and triumphs on their faces. They stopped at an oak tree, delighted, puzzled, apprehensive.

Winter, and his children shivered at the front gate, silhouetted against a blazing house. Winter, and a man walked into the street, dropped his glasses, and shot a dog.  

Summer, and he watched his children’s heart break. Autumn again, and Boo’s children needed him.

Atticus was right. One time he said you never really know a man until you stand in his shoes and walk around in them. Just standing on the Radley porch was enough.  (pages 373-374)

Mockingbird blog #14

 


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Posted March 17, 2017 by equinson in category To Kill a Mockingbird

32 thoughts on “Just standing on the Radley porch was enough.

  1. Toa Neil

    This is a magnificent passage. I noticed how it depicts Boo and the children’s relationship. It also shows the events of the book from his point of view and shows the passage of time. It also directly calls back to what Atticus said earlier about not judging unless you “stand in his shoes”.

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  2. tarika1

    The author made this passage to close the story. It is remembering the events of the story in a way that the readers feel almost like the whole town is different. She uses tone in the passage with a tone of recollection. This makes readers feel like the story is done and the lessons have been learned, the feeling of closure. This is successful because it truly does make the readers have a sense of closure.

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  3. maddy

    The primary purpose of this excerpt is to depict Scout beholding a fragment of the manner in which Boo lives. Whilst on the Radleys’ porch, Scout disclosed that she had not viewed her neighborhood from such an angle. I regard Lee’s usage of the term “angle” in this exemplar to be intentional and versatile, for it can be interpreted to have a twofold denotation. Scout had not observed her neighborhood from such an angle because she had not been on the Radleys’ porch antecedently, or thought to have espoused Boo’s viewpoints as the town recluse in accordance to occurrences outside of his home; in similar wording, standing in Boo’s shoes and walking around in them. This commences to support the analogy that setting and perspective are heavily intertwined subjects with substantial significance to one another within this excerpt as well as throughout additional sections of “To Kill a Mockingbird”.

    Scout observing her neighborhood from where Boo observed their neighborhood enabled her to envision life as she imagined Boo would. Thus, as Scout reminisced of the vast yearly memories shared betwixt the tightknit Maycomb community, she began to acknowledge the impact that these memories must have had on Boo. Given that Boo is a housebound hermit, he does not have a sense of community, or such memories. Boo watched from afar as Scout, Jem, and Dill romped about during the summertime, as the Tom Robinson trial occurred, and as Miss Maudie’s house was ablaze. Boo witnessed it all, yet he did so from afar. He interacted with only his relatives as a result of being confined to his home, and the predominance of Maycomb conversed of him as a ruthless monster. It is evident that due to these aforementioned reasons, Boo is of a desolate, yearning nature. Scout now realizes how witnessing all of these memories, yet not being able to experience them, greatly impacted Boo. This did not occur to her beforehand because she had been fixated with the false descriptions and stories that town gossips had told of Boo. She was preoccupied with Boo being some type of rabid and monstrous reality, yet did not ponder the probability of there being falsehoods within tales of him, or concern herself with how lonesome and saddened he must be.

    I view Lee to be successful in advancing her primary purpose of this excerpt. It is evidently depicted that Scout has glimpsed as well as briefly comprehended how desolate and isolated Boo is through the utilization of setting, homographs, and point of view. Setting is a utilized rhetoric because had it not been for Scout being on the Radleys’ porch, it is probable that she would not have adopted Boo’s viewpoint of occurrences within the neighborhood. The term “angle” is a homograph that was utilized within this excerpt due to its twofold denotation in the following line: “I had never seen our neighborhood from this angle.” One applicable denotation for “angle” is the Radleys’ porch, and another is Boo’s viewpoint. Point of view was an additional tactic utilized in this excerpt because Scout adopted Boo’s point of view as the town recluse in accordance to occurrences outside of his home.

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  4. laurena2

    This passage in novel is truly important because of how much it relates to everything stated earlier in the book. This one scene is a small fragment of the entire summary of this novel, every event that had occurred earlier was stated very briefly. However, we see all of these events from a different point of view. In each season, there was one very important event that occurred. The setting and season in which all of these events took place has a dramatic effect on how the reader sees the story. Each season was a new adventure waiting to come, but we do not see them like we did before. By introducing this new point of view, the readers do not completely grow up with the children, however we watch them experience life and mature from afar.

    Reply
    1. christophert3

      I completely agree. I loved the way your idea about Harper Lee’s goal in including this passage and I 100% agree. We do not grow with them, but see how they have experienced life and grown from afar(love that sentence). Very well written and thought about. 🙂

      Reply
  5. ilyssal

    The above fragment of the novel has a great significance. It is a refresher of all the previous events in the novel, going through the story briefly in chronological order. This passage allows us to reflect on those moments through a different perspective. Thursday night’s homework was to reread the first chapter of “To Kill a Mockingbird” and see how it foreshadows the rest of the story. The passage, like the primary chapter, completes the novel. It ties in all the loose ends and brings everything back to one major point. Also, the passage lets the readers view the children from a different, more mature perspective, almost as if we are watching over them as they grow and age.

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  6. caias1

    This scene from the novel is important because it shows Scout standing in Boo’s shoes for the first time, and the whole story is told from Boo’s perspective. Harper Lee uses point of view to advance her purpose where she states in her sentences, “his children.” Boo Radley is only seen once or twice in the novel, and readers never saw what connection he had to Jem and Scout since the beginning of the story. Boo started considering them his kids from the start of the book.

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  7. christophert3

    I believe that, after reading this passage for the second time, Harper Lee’s main purpose in writing this was to sum up the story in an interesting way as well as reveal to us how Boo/Arthur felt about Scout and Jem. It was to show us why he felt such a strong bond with them that he would risk his life for them and kill another man for their sake. One thing that I felt was very strong was how Scout was looking back at her life in Boo’s shoes, summing up the entire story in third person from afar. It was very eye opening and created a very cool aspect of the story that we never saw before. I also felt that it was funny that after all the reading we did to finish the book, Harper Lee goes and sums up the whole thing in a paragraph or two, though I still believe you should never read the summary of a book. The only thing that was intriguing about how she summed it up was seeing the story from a different point of view. I believe she succeeded in revealing to us what led to Boo developing a bond with Jem and Scout as well as reminding us of very important events in the novel, which I now see fit to call a Bildungsroman.

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    1. christophert3

      I also forgot to say that the season’s help the reader see, within the novel, how Scout and Jem have developed and that the summary given by Scout not only develop’s that theme given to us by Atticus in the beginning of the novel, but also emphasize and highlight key events that led to a dramatic change in the minds of Scout and Jem.

      Reply
  8. charlottes

    This passage is very important to the novel in its entirety. The purpose of this passage is to take the reader back in the novel to previous events. Doing this allows the reader to look back from another perspective. Scout is taking Atticus’s words and trying to put herself into Boo’s shoes and see the world around him. This lets Scout and the reader see what Boo has been seeing from the Radley house. Through the years and the seasons that have gone by, Scout now sees everything differently. One of the first sentences in the passage states this. “I turned to go home. Street lights winked down the street all the way to town. I had never seen our neighborhood from this angle. There were Miss Maudie’s, Miss Stephanie’s- there was our house, I could see the porch swing- Miss Rachel’s house was beyond us, plainly visible. I could even see Mrs. Dubose’s.” This relates back to Atticus’s words from chapter 3. “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view-” This isn’t just showing us how Boo sees the world, it is showing us how Scout has grown as well. We see her taking Atticus’s words into consideration. This quote shows a lot about perspectives and the growth of characters.

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  9. sofiad1

    The purpose of this passage was to illustrate how Boo sees the community of Macomb. It further emphasizes Atticus’ point of in order to understand someone, you need to walk a day in their shoes. Harper Lee does this by setting the scene of aa summer day in Macomb. She has Scout see what Boo Radley sees every day of his life.

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  10. arihantp1

    The “angle” that Scout sees from the Radley Porch is in fact Boo Radley’s perspective on Scout and Jem. As Boo Radley watched them he grew more and more fond of them, getting to the point where when they are in danger he thinks, “…Summer, and he watched his children’s heart break. Autumn again, and Boo’s children needed him.” (pg. 374). Everyone in Maycomb County thinks of Boo as monster, who lurks around at night searching for his next victim, and animals in which he eats raw. But in reality he’s just a lonely man. Harper Lee conveys these passages in way that stirs emotions and that gives a sense of closure as she recalls all the past events in the book, and showing how the rumored “monster” is actually a hero.

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  11. Tyler Newby

    This passage is a perfect representation of Atticus’s advice that you never really know someone unless you stand in their shoes. In this passage, Scout was basically standing in Boo Radley’s shoes, as she saw everything from his point of view. Scout says she “had never seen our neighborhood from this angle.” Scout realizes that Boo Radley really isn’t a psychopath or a criminal, but just a lonely and misunderstood old man. Scout realizes that Boo Radley witnessed all of her experiences on that little street, and he felt that he needed to help. “Summer, and he watched his children’s heart break. Autumn again, and Boo’s children needed him,” she reflects.

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  12. francescaa

    The main purpose of this passage is to show the reader how much Scout has grown throughout the book. In this passage Scout is imagining all her memories through the eyes of Boo Radley. As Scout is standing on the Radley porch she plays through all the memories of every season of her childhood. “It was still summertime….. It was fall…… Winter….”. Harper Lee took all the major events that happened throughout the book and condensed them in a page. By doing so, Harper Lee shows that duality and simple versus complex is a theme in this novel. The whole book was told in Scout’s point of view, which was consequently very complex or else there wouldn’t be a book at all. However, on the other hand there is Boo. By looking seeing his very simple point of view the reader understands the life Boo lives. He is very lonely and just wants someone he can care for. He calls Scout and Jem “ His children”, which shows how caring he is; a complete juxtaposition to the rumors Scout and Jem were led to believe. Also, by looking through Boos “angle” the reader understands the lesson Harper Lee wanted the reader to learn. On multiple occasions Atticus said, “ you never really know a man until you stand in his shoes and walk around with them.” Scout didn’t understand this at first, but after stepping in Boo’s shoes I think she appreciated these words of wisdom.
    By incorporating a nostalgic mood to this passage Harper Lee gave the reader a sense of closure. Almost like a conclusion, this passage pulled out the highlights of To Kill A Mockingbird. Having 350 pages summed up into a paragraph somehow made me appreciate Harper Lee as a writer. She somehow took a list of events and turned it into a marvelous piece of literature that is considered an American classic.

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  13. avae1

    Harper Lee’s purpose in crafting this beautiful passage was to enhance the setting of Maycomb. As Scout stands on the Radley porch she witnesses her hometown in a way she had never before. One of Scout’s best traits is her yearn for exploration, which is something most children of her age share. Whether it concerns Boo, or her father, she is curious and eager to learn more about people. Although one might say that Maycomb does not have much to offer. In this small town there is not much to see or do, however in this passage Scout proves this wrong. We, the readers, have gone on a journey with Scout as she grew up, and we have learned that Maycomb is so much more than a small southern town. With each season there are new stories, different people to talk to and remarkable occurrences. With the conclusion of the novel Lee reminds us of past events that have shaped the people of Maycomb, especially Scout and Jem. As Scout sees Maycomb in a new perspective, she reflects on how much she has explored, and yet how much there still is to see.

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  14. ivanl

    The main purpose for the creation of this paragraph is to show a different view to the events, explained from Boo Radley’s point of view. The use of seasons also interested me a lot. Boo, being in his house for the entirety of the book until the very end, probably does not know the names of Scout and Jem. Instead by using the seasons, Harper refers to the frame of time that these events had occurred, which were in chronological order, same as the order the seasons come in. At the end of the paragraph, Scout and Jem are also referred to as Boo’s “children.” In needing him, this is probably when Bob Ewell attacked them both, and Boo come out to save them. This further shows that Boo is not a monster at all, viewing Scout and Jem as his very own children.

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  15. briannag3

    Harper Lee’s main purpose of writing this passage was to show some of the main events of the novel but through Boo’s eyes. Scout tells us how she can see basically the entire neighborhood just from the Radley’s porch. She described the different events and showed the different seasons that the events occurred in and where, also retelling the events in the order that they happened in. However, something that confused me in this quote is how nearing the end Harper Lee referred to Jem and Scout as Boo’s children. I had to reread this a couple of times before I could understand that Boo was actually a substantial part of their lives. He made mysteries for them with his gifts in the tree hole and they played a game about his family when Dill when they were younger. And in the end, it was Boo that saved both of their lives.

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  16. alexo

    I feel like the main purpose of this passage was to give some of the book to Arthur, give the reader some insight into how he lived his life, in a way that I had never thought of him before. Before this passage, we knew almost nothing about Mr. Arthur. We didn’t know how he lived,what he liked, what he found funny, and his beliefs. Beforehand, Boo was just Boo. I assumed that he wanted to be friends with the kids, but I found him to be an odd figure, one that always lurked in the shadows and didn’t know how to deal with others in a social manner. Even though this passage doesn’t answer all of the questions I have about Boo, it does shows us that although it is true that he is quite weird, it does show us (along with saving Jem and Scout), that even though he is a very creepy person, when you really examine him, you’ll find him to instead be a loving, caring creepy person (that doesn’t know how to socialize).

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  17. alexo

    I feel like the main purpose of this passage was to give some of the book to Arthur, give the reader some insight into how he lived his life, in a way that I had never thought of him before. Before this passage, we knew almost nothing about Mr. Arthur. We didn’t know how he lived,what he liked, what he found funny, and what he believed in. Beforehand, Boo was just Boo. I assumed that he wanted to be friends with the kids, but I found him to be an odd figure, one that always lurked in the shadows and didn’t know how to deal with others in a social manner. Even though this passage doesn’t answer all of the questions I have about Boo, it does shows us that although it is true that he is quite weird, this passage (along with saving Jem and Scout), that even though he is a very creepy person, when you examine his actions, you’ll find him to be a creepy person that loves and cares about the Finch family.

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  18. faithw

    Early on in Harper Lee’s novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, Atticus teaches Scout to always take other people’s point of view into consideration. “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view… Until you climb into his skin and walk around in it” (p.39).

    The literary device of point of view is the way in which an author chooses to narrate his/her story. Harper Lee employs first person point of view and uses Scout as the narrator. The narration uniquely switches between Scout’s point of view as a naive child and her perspective as a mature adult. Everything that happens is seen through Scout’s eyes. Scout tells the details of what she saw and heard as a child, but adds her thoughts about her experiences in hindsight with an adult perspective. The passage listed above from chapter 31, shows that Scout has learned the true meaning of Attius’ lesson. Standing on Boo Radley’s porch, she has learned to see life through his eyes. Scout has been fascinated for years with the inside of Boo’s house, but now that she is actually standing on his porch, she does not look inside. Instead, she turns around and faces outward. She sees Maycomb as Boo would have. Scout learned what the world looks like from the Radley place. She has finally developed the ability to take on another person’s point of view. She imagines many of her life’s events (for example, her and Jem finding presents in the oak tree and both of them shivering in front of Miss Maudie’s burning house) through Boo’s eyes. At that point, she realizes that Boo had loved and protected Jem and her for years and actually thinks of them as “his children”.

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    1. eshap

      I agree, the way Harper Lee switches between Scout’s innocent side as a child and her mature side as an adult is interesting. It does help us to understand how Scout realizes the way Boo Radley sees the rest of the world from his window.

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  19. marinas1

    The main purpose of this passage is not only to view Scout and Jem’s lives through Boo Radley’s eyes, but also to understand the way Boo Radley perceives and associates himself with these two children who live just down the street. In this passage, we see what kind of lives these two children have lead: ones filled with both happiness and heartbreak, laughter and despair. Through such a description of the rollercoasters that are Scout and Jem’s lives, we see Boo’s feeling of connection towards these kids. After all, they are living the life he barely ever got to live. This connection explains the oak tree, where he left, as Scout says in the Boldungsroman “…two soap dolls, a broken watch and chain, a pair of good-luck pennies…” (p.373) The soap dolls are particularly interesting in relation to this passage. In the novel, Harper Lee describes them as being “…almost perfect miniatures of two children. The boy had on shorts, and a shock of soapy hair fell to his eyebrows. I looked up at Jem. A point of straight brown hair kicked downward from his part..The girl-doll wore bangs. So did I.” (p.80) When reading this except for the first time, I believed this gift was insanely eerie and quite frightening. However, rereading it now, I see it as a way for Boo to connect to these two kids he loves seeing every day through his window. Boo Radley does indeed feel a connection to these kids, but he also lives vicariously through them. Since he locked himself away in his house before living most of his life, it’s inderstandable why he is infatuated with the innocence of these kids. They have so much more time to really live, something he will never do, for he never wants to leave his house.

    We see how this connection is displayed in the novel by the juxtaposition of the inside and the outside. In the passage, Boo is watching the outside from the inside, through the window. Harper Lee writes “To the left of the brown door was a long shuttered window… It was daytime and the neighborhood was busy. Miss Stephanie Crawford crossed the street to tell the latest to Miss Rachel. Miss Maudie bent over her azaleas. It was summertime, and two children scampered down the sidewalk toward a man approaching in the distance. The man waved, and the children raced each other to him.” (p.373) In this passage, we see the street just as Boo sees it, from the inside looking out. Here, we see two kids, blisteringly bright and elated, running toward a man, presumably their father. It seems like they have no other care in the world. This happiness in seeing family is most certaintly something Boo has never experienced. After all, Miss Maudie describes Boo’s father as a “foot-washing baptist”, one that may be an abusive father. Clearly, that kind of physical abuse would definitely not be a wonderful thing for Boo to associate his father with. Through that idea, we can see how Boo admires these kids and their father, who lifts them up instead of bringing them down, in juxtaposition to a father who must have been truly awful towards Boo. In a way, Scout and Jem are leading a life Boo never got to live, one of innocence and cheerfulness. In addition, inside versus outside further accentuates Boo’s connection to the kids. These kids go on wonderful adventures and fiascos, which all take place outside. However, Boo is on the inside, where he does not experience such things. In this way, we can see how Boo lives vicariously through them when they are on the outside of their home, for they are doing things he never got to do.

    Harper Lee is completely successful in how she convey’s her idea of Boo’s connection to Scout and Jem. Not only does she use duality to show how Boo lives vicariously through these kids when he is looking outside, but also calls Scout and Jem “his children”. In this way, we see Boo as thinking of Jem and Scout as if they are his own flesh and blood. This makes complete sense, for he’s watched them grow and become less like two kids and more like two individuals. In this sense, the everyday struggles and jubilance of being a child is all he has. He does not have a mother nor a father. He just has these two people, who will continue to grow (and, after saving them, adore Boo as well) before his very eyes.

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  20. cameronl3

    The ending to the book is very significant to the book, since it really brings everything together and helps us understand the reasons why everything happens. This one scene brings up previous parts of the novel, and very briefly brings all of the scenes together. It also shows us the point of view of another perspective, so we are able to understand other characters thoughts too. As the novel closes, we are given two completely different characters than the ones we met in the beginning of the story, as they are much more mature and intelligent. This scene brings all of the loose ends of the story together, so that many of the questions we readers may have are answered.

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  21. margauxc

    Harper Lee concludes her literary classic, “To Kill a Mockingbird”, with Jean Louise Finch narrating all the significant parts of her childhood in Arthur Radley’s perspective. Of course, not all of the significant parts of the novel are included, since Harper Lee’s summation is brief. Instead, in a certain perspective, the parts which are included are the acts which define the neighborhood for Scout. The acts which happened outside of her house or outside of school (which tend to be places where she’s expected to act maturely) are the memories included in this sequence. A reason as to why Harper Lee may have written this text is because it completes Scout’s character development arch. Atticus Finch once told his children, “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view… until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.” Jeremy Finch, the elder of the two children, seemed to be the first to truly take Atticus’ words to heart. Throughout the novel, Scout attempts and struggles to practice her father’s advice, with her attempting to take into account situations from both the Cunninghams or the Ewells’ perspectives. The presence of the scene provides a fulfilling ending to Scout’s character development arch seeing as she can finally understand and practice Atticus’ teachings. In addition, Harper Lee specifically mentions what season the memory takes place, which conveys how quickly time passed within the novel- which emphasizes Scout’s realization of exactly how long Boo Radley has been absent from the streets of Maycomb.

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  22. alekhya

    In this ending, Harper Lee gives us a view of Scout’s neighborhood and her life through the eyes of Boo Radley. Here she tries to define Boo’s life, where he has spent so much time just watching Jem and Scout grow up, face the problems of society, and have fun. She utilized the changing of the seasons to show the constantly changing world of these children compared to his life imprisoned in his own home. Scout finally, truly steps into someone else’s skin, or rather onto their porch and sees their life and understands them. But in this paragraph Harper Lee also defines her novel as a bildungsroman. through Boo’s eyes we witness Scout and especially Jem mature and rise to the challenges the world puts before them. She also uses this perspective to tell the story of Atticus and how dearly his children love him.

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  23. Rebecca F

    In the end of the book, Harper Lee uses point of view to teach the reader a valuable lesson through the eyes of the young, but precocious, Scout. Earlier on in the novel, Atticus imparts upon Scout valuable information when he says, “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view . . . until you climb into his skin and walk around in it,” (p. 85). At the time, Scout did not fully understand the value of what Atticus told her. Yet as she stands on Radley porch, despite it being night, she sees the light. She understands what Atticus meant, as she sees the world through the eyes of Boo Radley. She reminisces her many adventures with Jem on the street, recalling the events of the past seasons through the eyes of a third person, Boo Radley. As she does this, she understands Boo even better than before, realizing that he is not a monster crawling through the dark. In the words of Atticus, as Scout stands there on the porch, she ” . . . climbs into his skin and walks around in it,” (p. 85).

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  24. adam

    This captivating conclusion of the novel displays outstanding connections throughout the novel and congregates many themes present in book. This closure also portrays the many possibilities of the book, and the inner meaning. It shows the perspectives of several characters, as well as changes that took place. The passage is seen through the person of Scout but vicariously living through Boo and seeing the book and change through his eyes. The perception of the town changed as Scout stands on the porch , as now the neighborhood is at “a different angle.” The neighborhood has never been seen this way. It is all new in his eyes and has a new perception. Maturity is an evident theme shown, as nothing as seen the same way, and much has changed. The interpretation of Maycomb county has changed significantly. Yet, Boo has experienced so much. He has seen Scout and Jem mature before his eyes, and becomes more fond of them. Scout and Jem now see Boo not as a monster or a maniac, but a lonely, innocent man looking for company. The theme of both perception and opportunities are obvious in the novel. At first, Boo was shown as a scary person who nobody really wanted to be around. But, it was rumors that gave off this information, and when given the opportunity, it was no longer this way. People were able to know eachother and get to know eachother. Opportunities lead to endless possibilities. Now that everybody has matured, it is now heart warming that each character can live vicariously through one another, as Scout is with Boo. He sees the neighborhood through his eyes, and it looks completely different now. Everything has multiple views and interpretations, there is always more than one way to look at something. This shows how much Scout has grown mentally, as he transformed from a careless football player to a strong, open minded person. Lee is overwhelmingly successful in using tactics to show the importance of the novel. The juxtaposition used in showing the old versus the new in each characters eyes, and comparing characters while displaying maturity is brilliantly used by Lee. The conclusion of “To Kill a Mockingbird” is truly exquisite and meaningful.

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  25. willowm

    In this scene Scout is seeing her town from a whole new angle, Boo Radley’s perspective from his house. This shows how Scout has grown throughout the novel. She is now able to see things from other people’s perspectives, making this book a bildungsroman. I think she included the seasons to show that even though it was only a year, a lot has changed. Harper Lee outlines certain events in the book, almost like a summary. It is also revealed that Boo Radley cares about the children, so much so that he risks his life to save them. I think that Boo lives vicariously through Scout and Jem by watching from the confines of his home.

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  26. George

    This summary of “To Kill a Mockingbird” gives a rnoewarding summary to the reader of Finches experiences over the course of the book. It does not explain any of the other aspects of the book. It does not encapsulate any themes of racism, sexism, and coming of age. It does not explain the world through a childs eye’s. It does not properly encase the injustice of the south. So overall it is inarguably improper.

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  27. eshap

    In this excerpt from To Kill A Mockingbird, the main purpose is to see how Scout realizes the life Boo Radley went through, and see how he experienced the events occurring outside the Radley house for the past few years. For Scout’s entire life, and more, Boo Radley had hidden himself from the world of Maycomb. There were many rumors spread about, but none of them proved to be true. Scout grew up hearing these rumors, thinking they were true. From this, Jem, Dill, and Scout made reenactments of what they believed to be Boo Radley’s life. There were many moments where Scout thought, maybe even imagined, that he was watching. She wondered what he could possibly be thinking if he ever saw them. “Summertime, and his children played in the front yard with their friends, enacting a strange little drama of their own invention…Winter, and a man walked into the street, dropped his glasses, and shot a dog…Summer, and he watched his children’s heart break.” (page 374) Scout tries to relive their play, when Atticus shot the dog, and the verdict of the trial disappointed them. However, this time, she looks at these events as if she were another person, more specifically, Boo Radley. He’s lived the majority of his life seeing the reactions of his neighbors, figuring out exactly what was going on. Scout realizes how Boo Radley felt about them, not just her and Jem, but their lives. It seemed so unreal to him, staying inside the house, looking outside at people he never introduced himself to properly. Scout sees how Boo Radley could see everything from the window, and in a way, was involved in their lives simply by paying attention when they were in need.

    Harper Lee helps demonstrate how Scout realizes the way Boo Radley lived through the recollection of events. Only when Scout remembers past events can she actually figure out Boo Radley’s secluded life. With the current situation she was in, everything was so confusing that she couldn’t process it right away. However, before the trial, when their lives were a little more simple, the events always had some involvement with the Radley house. The dog was shot in front of the Radley house, Scout and Jem stood in front of the house during the fire when Boo Radley put a blanket around Scout, and their play was based on what happened inside the Radley house. Through the remembrance of Scout’s more innocent childhood, she can now see that Boo Radley had experienced these events in his own way. He shows that he recognizes all of these events by placing objects into the knot hole of the tree. “They stopped at an oak tree, delighted, puzzled, apprehensive.” (page 374) At the time, Scout and Jem were confused by why Boo Radley left them “presents”. As Scout grows older, she realizes that Boo Radley paid attention to everything that happened, and although he didn’t want to be involved, he left small hints to show that he noticed.

    Harper Lee is successful in portraying her point by giving a broad selection of past events in Maycomb. She does not limit Scout’s memory to a certain time period, but rather over a period of time. This shows that Boo Radley taking notice in outside events did not only occur during a short amount of time. Starting from the summer the summer when Dill began to visit Maycomb, up until the trial, we see how Boo Radley has experienced these events from Scout’s observations during and after the event. By giving a vast selection of events, Harper Lee shows how Scout has taken notice to Boo Radley, and with a more mature mind, she has taken notice how much Boo Radley can see from his window.

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  28. kat

    In the above passage Harper Lee really brings the book together. All throughout the book Scout has been afraid of Boo Radley, and thinks that he is a monster. However all throughout the book Atticus has been trying to teach Scout a very important lesson, that you never really know a man until you stand in his shoes and walk around in them. In this passage Scout does what Attticus says. She stands on the Radley porch so that she can see the way that Boo sees. She sees her whole neighborhood from a different perspective, but most of all Scout see’s Boo’s perspective. She sees why Boo watched them. She replays her life but through the eyes of Boo. She sees all the major points. Looks at the fear, the joy, and the sadness. I was also interested in this part; “Summer, and he watched his children’s heart break. Autumn again, and Boo’s children needed him.” The way that Harper Lee phrases this is interesting. It is Scout’s perspective but yet she say’s Boo’s children, like he owns them. I think she does this for multiple reasons. Harper Lee is really trying to stress the idea that Scout not only accepts Boo but also sees how he sees now. By having Scout use Boo’s name as possessive of her and Jem it is showing that she is happy with what Boo did, She understands why and really likes him. Also this passage sums up the book. It shows that Scout has learned a valuable lesson, while also expressing the fact that Scout and Jem’s thrilling adventure is over for now. Scout will never see Boo again, but she still has talked to him, and she knows about him. I felt that this was a good ending because it looked back into the book where as the beginning was a look into the book. I believe that may be one of the reasons Mrs. Quinson had us read theses sections back to back.

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