October 16

Artist, JR, creates a picnic across the Mexican Border Wall

JR has taken on social causes throughout his career.  With a goal of bringing people together and understanding that the human race is one family, JR has created works of art around the world.

This week, his latest work, a giant picnic,has sparked much interest and discussion.For more on the project,

click here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

To learn more about other inspirational projects by JR, check out his TedTalk.

March 22

Sesame Street supports diversity and inclusion with the introduction of Julia, a muppet with Autism

Last week, 60 minutes reported on Sesame Streets newest muppet, Julia.

Excerpts:

“Sesame Street” has always based its characters and content on extensive research.  They regularly bring in educators and child psychologists. In the case of Julia, they also worked with autism organizations to decide which characteristics she should have and how best to normalize autism for all children.

It’s tricky because autism is not one thing, because it is different for every single person who has autism. There is an expression that goes, “If you’ve met one person with autism, you’ve met one person with autism,” says writer Christine Ferraro.

And of course every Muppet needs a puppeteer.  But not every puppeteer has the connection Stacey Gordon does to the role. Gordon is the mother of a son with autism.

Stacey Gordon: Had my son’s friends been exposed to his behaviors through something that they had seen on TV before they experienced them in the classroom, they might not have been frightened. They might not have been worried when he cried. They would have known that he plays in a different way and that that’s OK.

March 14

Biracial twins are a beautiful embodiment to challenge the labeling of individuals based on the color of their skin

In this blog post by Elisabeth Parker, beautiful photos of bi-racial twins are highlighted.

From the article:

The odds of having a set of biracial twins with different skin colors is around one in 350 to one in 400, and the odds that any pair of twins will have different skin colors is one in 500. In the U.S. — as of 2013 — twins accounted for around three out of 100 births. [AUTHOR’S NOTE: As pointed out by many readers, “race” itself is an artificial construct that has no basis in science. While visual markers may tell us something about our ancestry, the genes that determine our appearance are just .01 percent of our total genetic makeup.]

Back in 2015, the internet was all abuzz over Lucy and Maria Aylmer, a lovely pair of biracial twins from across the pond in the U.K. They say no one believes they’re sisters, and we can certainly see why. Their dad Vince is white and their mom Donna is black. But instead of looking like a blend of both races — as many mixed race children do — Lucy has fair skin and cinnamon hair while Maria has a café au lait complexion and abundant black curls.

February 25

Exploring Our Mixed Race Identity through Ceramics and Photography

“We need to set aside the obvious assumptions of visual identity that is merely skin deep,” says writer and ceramics artist Heidi McKenzie in the February issue of Ceramics Monthly.

These assumptions do not enable us to appreciate the complexity of our true and complete selves.

Click here to read her complete article,  Paradox: Identity and Belonging where she highlights the work of several mixed race ceramic artists.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Of additional note on the topic is photographer Martin Schoeller. In 2013 his series The Changing Face of America was featured in National Geographic.  This series of photographs explores the visual power of mixed race individuals and highlights a comparison of self-identification with Census check boxes.