Classwork, homework and assignments 2019

March 2019

TURNITIN

20690569          12H English pd 2

20690579          12H English pd 4

ENROLLMENT KEY: rhetoric

Food Unit

In this unit of study, we will explore food in general and the food industry in particular, which is at the nexus of many major forces in today’s society.

The production and consumption of food is closely linked with climate change, ethics, the minimum wage debate, immigration law, government involvement in personal choices, criminal justice reform, social justice, health care debates and education, just to name a few. On a personal level, food is connected to individual and collective memory, culture, comfort, health, tradition and history.

We will read a series of articles on the topic and “follow the breadcrumbs” of our individual interests and curiosity to a craft a compelling argument. As we read and analyze the moves and structures in a variety of arguments, you will:

  • develop your writer’s voice
  • utilize streamlined search strategies and learn how to carefully vet your sources
  • reinforce your understanding of various types of claims
  • implement technical skills using in text citations
  • learn about logical fallacies and consider how to avoid them
  • craft a solid counterargument and rebuttal

Your masterfully crafted argument will be due on Thursday, March 21. (Polished draft for peer editing due 19 March).

It will be 5 – 7  pages (including your works cited page) and must be uploaded to Turnitin.

Here is a student exemplar (with thanks to Matt Lucido):

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1fEtge0l5-QVZjlX2TcyQjfk630i39r6Eck_DMM7wfYw/edit?usp=sharing

 

Monday, March 11: HOMEWORK DUE – CLAIM FORM AND SOURCES WORKSHEET. BE SURE TO FILL OUT COMPLETELY AND IDENTIFY THE TYPE OF CLAIM.

Claim and sources worksheet

ALSO DUE TODAY: “The Carnivore’s Dilemma” (pg. 973.) Be sure to research author. Answer all questions in writing.

In class: discuss “Carnivore.” Organizing your findings and structuring your argument.

Fallacy presentations pd 2: Circular reasoning and Either/or reasoning with Wendy and Segal AND

Post hoc, ergo propter hoc and Slippery Slope  with Jimmy G, Aideen F and Morgan. 

Fallacy presentations pd 4: Straw Man and Ad Hominem with Liz and Lauren  AND

Red herring and Faulty analogy with Sarah and Jess R. 

HW: Work on your argument.

Tuesday, March 12:Developing a counter argument.

Fallacy presentations pd. 2:  Red herring and Faulty analogy with Josh and J.P. 

Fallacy presentations pd. 4: Circular reasoning and Either/or reasoning with Martin and Aryan

HW: View this short video on counterargument. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yfTl1kbybvU

Read “The American Table and the Global Table” (pg. 967.) Answer questions 1 -3, 5 – 6 in writing.  HW: Work on your argument. 

Wednesday, March 13:

Discuss “American and Global.”

Fallacy presentations pd. 2 and pd. 4: Bandwagon, Non Sequitur with Jenn, Claire and Miranda/ Jill and Lucy 

HW: Work on your argument and study for tomorrow’s logical fallacy quiz.

PERIOD 2 FALLACY FOLDER: https://drive.google.com/drive/u/0/folders/1eI21AbtZZm6fBG9N4ttk2TAfZsi53ig7

PERIOD 4 FALLACY FOLDER: https://drive.google.com/drive/u/0/folders/1EnoWOXzefvRbiy0VnLPlwcKY4t8j7R22

Thursday, March 14Logical Fallacy quiz.

Friday, March 15:  Students work on arguments. HW: Work on your argument.

Monday, March 18: Students work on arguments. Polished draft for peer editing due tomorrow.

Tuesday, March 19:  Food arguments peer editing.

Wednesday, March 20: Argument work day.

Thursday, March 21: Food arguments due. Must be uploaded to Turnitin. Late arguments lose 10 pts. per day (which includes tomorrow, Friday.)

Friday, March 22: Early release or Superintendent’s conference day.

Monday, February 25: Launch food unit with a gallery walk of quotations about food and ppt. Be sure to bring your textbook to class on Wednesday, February 27th.

HW due Tuesday: Click into some of the links on our Food for Thought page. Begin to consider your interests for this argument.

AND View both short clips on the food industry and take notes. Summarize the claim and purpose. Write down two points you find most compelling. Include two questions you have that could lead you into a deeper investigation and opinion piece.Come to class prepared to discuss:

Clip One:

Why we shouldn’t let the food industry dictate our diets – Michael Pollan on the PBS Newshour. https://www.pbs.org/newshour/show/why-we-shouldnt-let-the-food-industry-dictate-our-diets

Clip Two:

How uneaten college cafeteria meals can fight food insecurity.

https://www.pbs.org/newshour/show/how-uneaten-college-cafeteria-meals-can-help-fight-food-insecurity

Homework due Wednesday, 2/27: Read and take notes on “A Naturalist in the Supermarket” (962 – 965). Answer (in writing) questions 1, 2, 5 and 6. Reread Staking a Claim pg. 85 – 86. Please bring your textbook.

Tuesday, February 26: Discuss clips. Introduction to and scheduling of logical fallacy presentations. Logical fallacy quiz Thursday, March 14. 

Fallacy presentations (30 pts.)

  1. Appeal to False Authority and Hasty Generalization
  2. Straw Man and Ad Hominem (3)
  3. Circular reasoning and Either/or reasoning
  4. Post hoc, ergo propter hoc and Slippery Slope (3)
  5. Red herring and Faulty analogy
  6. Bandwagon and Non Sequitur (3)

HERE IS OUR FALLACY SCHEDULE AND DATES: Fallacy schedule 19-2n645ci

Homework due Wednesday, 2/27: Read and take notes on “A Naturalist in the Supermarket” (962 – 965) in LOC. Answer (in writing) questions 1, 2, 5 and 6. Reread Staking a Claim pg. 85 – 86. Focus on claims as arguable, significant and not too easily verifiable (or obvious). Please bring your textbook.

Wednesday, February 27: Discuss and collaborate on a SOAPStone for  “A Naturalist…” Time permitting: lesson a conducting a targeted search.

Thursday, February 28: Style review of “Naturalist…”  Time permitting: brainstorm ideas for your argument. begin reading NYer article.

HW due Friday: Read and annotate and SOAPStone – “What does ‘The Scarecrow’ Tell Us About Chipotle?” by Elizabeth Weiss (The New Yorker).

Friday, March 1: Discuss structure of Weiss’s argument. Connecting  appeals and claims – view and evaluate Chipotle’s honest scarecrow ad.

Homework: Read in your LOC textbook pgs. 81 – 120. Be sure to take notes on types of claims, fallacies, induction and deduction as well as the classical oration.  Skip reading all the activities and articles, WITH THE EXCEPTION OF Amy Domini’s “Why Investing in Fast Food May Be a Good Thing.” Do the activity on pg. 85 that accompanies the Domini article, and after reading about claims, write down what type of claim(s) she employs. All Google docs fallacy presentations due on Wednesday, March 6. (30 points).

You will commit to a claim and have three supporting sources by Friday, March 8. 

Do preliminary research to select a topic – see the Food for Thought page here on the blog. Also review resources on our Research page.

Monday, March 4: Edit review on agreement. Quiz on Friday, March 8. In class: Discuss Domini article and types of claim(s) employed.Considering claims: arguable vs. too easily verifiable. We will do the activity on page 86.  Research methods and claim development. See our Research page to access videos and resources. Time permitting: fallacy presentation work day.

HW: due tomorrow – read “The Locavore Myth” (pg. 965) and answer questions 1 – 4 in writing. Notice the basic structure of McWilliam’s argument. Reread Shaping an argument pgs. 111 -112. 

Tuesday, March 5: In class: Discuss types of claims in “Locavore Myth.”  Fallacy presentation work day.

. Settle on a topic and develop your claim. Your claim and sources worksheet is due on Friday, March 8. 

12H Claim and sources worksheet-1335llp

Wednesday, March 6:  Address any “leftovers.”

Thursday, March 7 :  Discuss “Carnivore’s Dilemma.” Be sure you have shared your fallacy presentation with me by 3pm today. 

Fallacy presentations begin: Appeal to False Authority and Hasty Generalization.  In class research and claim development day.

HW: Review your notes for tomorrow’s edit quiz.

Friday, March 8: Edit quiz on agreement on Monday, March 11.  Fallacy presentations – Straw Man and Ad Hominem and Circular reasoning and Either/or reasoning.

Research topic with claim (include type of claim) and three sources due Monday. 

Here is your claim and sources worksheet – please use this format. 12H Claim and sources worksheet-1335llp

Work on your argument.

HW due Monday:  “The Carnivore’s Dilemma” (pg. 973.) Be sure to research author. Answer all questions in writing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thursday, January 31:Discuss 8 and 9. View and discuss National Theater clips on character studies for creature and Victor.

HW: For Tuesday, February 5: read and take MIP and MIW notes on Vol. III, chapters 1 – 3 (up to page 214.) Note new characters, and plot points, as well as words, deeds and intentions.

Friday, February 1: Discuss Chapter 9. Review of semester one grammar and punctuation for Tuesday’s test. Time permitting, view clip on “Doubling.”

For your interest – a newstory on gene editing (CRISPR).

https://www.wnyc.org/story/new-us-experiments-aim-to-create-gene-edited-human-embryos

Monday, February 4: Superintendent’s conference day

Tuesday, February 5: Semester one edit test. HW due: read and take MIP and MIW notes on Vol. III, chapters 1 – 3 (up to page 214.) Note new characters, and plot points, as well as words, deeds and intentions. HW due Wednesday: Read and take notes (MIP/MIW/Plot and Characters/words, deeds, intentions) on Vol. III, Chapter 4 (pgs. 215 – 227).

Wednesday, February 6: HW due Thursday: Read and take notes (MIP/MIW/Plot and Characters/words, deeds, intentions) on Vol. III, Chapter 5 (pgs. 228 – 239).

Thursday, February 7: HW due Friday: Read and take notes (MIP/MIW/Plot and Characters/words, deeds, intentions) on Vol. III, Chapter 6 (pgs. 240 – 248).

Friday, February 8: HW due Monday: Read and take notes (MIP/MIW/Plot and Characters/words, deeds, intentions) on Vol. III, Chapter 7 (pgs. 249 – 275).

Monday, February 11: Review of Vol. III. HW: Review notes for tomorrow’s final.

Tuesday, February 12: Frankenfinal. 

Wednesday, February 13 – Friday, February 15: Mock Trial preparation.

Blog post of your choice due Friday at 3pm. 

 

 

 

January 2019

 

Be sure you have “read around” Frankenstein by exploring (and actually reading) a few of our articles/media on padlet:

https://padlet.com/mdisavino/frankenstein

Wednesday, January 2: share your findings on the novel. What themes and contemporary connections do you anticipate?  What might make Frankenstein relevant for our times? What are you most curious about? 

In class: Write a letter to yourself (reflections and resolutions) to be opened in January 2020. Be sure to bring in a forever stamp by Friday.

Thursday, January 3: introduction to Frankenstein. Begin reading (read up to page 54 by Monday.) REMEMBER TO BRING IN YOUR FOREVER STAMP.

Friday, January 4: View Mary Shelley bio. Read in groups.

Upcoming: grammar lesson on appositives (quiz on Friday, January 11).

Monday, January 7: reading quiz. Intro to Frankenstein. Review appositives.

Tuesday, January 8: focus on the letters and the epistolary frame. HW: Read and take notes up to and including chapter 4 by Thursday. Don’t be surprised by a reading quiz. Study grammar notes for Friday’s quiz.

Wednesday, January 9: review of chapters 1 -3. HW: Read and study (see Tuesday.)

Thursday, January 10: discuss chapter 4. Review for quiz.

Friday, January 11: Edit quiz. Read chapter 5 in groups. HW: Read and take notes and MIP and MIW chapters 5 and 6.

Monday, January 14: Review Chapters 5 and 6. In class: students read chapter 7.

Tuesday, January 15: Finish reading and discussing 7.

Wednesday, January 16: grammar review for Friday’s quiz. Introduction to Monster theory – Read “Monsters and the Moral Imagination” by Stephen Asma. Exploring the intersections of literature and psychology.

Thursday, January 17: Monster theory continued.

Friday, January 18: Grammar quiz. HW: blog post due 1/23.

Tuesday, January 22: wrap up Asma article. Tips for writing a crisp and concise summary, as well as punctuating titles and citing text.

UPDATED DEADLINE: HW: Monster theory blog post (40 pts. total [10 pts. for response to classmate’s post] due THURSDAY , JANUARY 24 by 10 PM. We will spend 15 minutes in class on FRIDAY , 1/25 reading each other posts, and then we will review Volume II, chapters 1 and 2. 

HW due Friday, 1/24: Read Vol. II, Chapters 1 and 2 with MIP and MIW (and notes on new characters/plot points). 

HW due Monday, 1/28: Read Chapters 3 and 4 with MIP and MIW (and notes on new characters/plot points).

Monday, January 28: Review semicolon usage in preparation for Tuesday’s edit test. HW due Tuesday, 1/29: Read Chapter 5 with MIP and MIW, and new plot points and characters.

Tuesday, January 29: Discuss Chapter 5 and read 6 and 7. HW due Wednesday: Take notes on 6 and 7, including MIPs and MIWs for each chapter. Review your notes for Tuesday’s edit test.

Wednesday, January 30: Discuss 6 and 7. Begin reading 8 – the “turning point” for our dear creature. View and discuss: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E67Ty4diDgE&app=desktop

HW: Finish reading 8 and 9 (end of Volume II.) Take notes on MIPs and MIWs.

AS YOU READ, CONSIDER WORDS, DEEDS AND INTENTIONS of both the creature and Victor.

Thursday, January 31:Discuss 8 and 9. View and discuss National Theater clips on character studies for creature and Victor.

HW: For Tuesday, February 5: read and take MIP and MIW notes on Vol. III, chapters 1 – 3 (up to page 214.) Note new characters, and plot points, as well as words, deeds and actions.

Friday, February 1: Discuss Chapter 9. Review of semester one grammar and punctuation for Tuesday’s test. Time permitting, view clip on “Doubling.”

For your interest – a newstory on gene editing (CRISPR).

https://www.wnyc.org/story/new-us-experiments-aim-to-create-gene-edited-human-embryos

 

 

 

 

DECEMBER ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

What makes an effective, enduring memorial?

Who or what is worth commemorating?

Who decides?

Is there such a thing as an effective memorial that does not stir up controversy? 

What are the differences and similarities between written and visual arguments?

Happy New Year! Here is the address for our padlet: https://padlet.com/mdisavino/frankenstein

 DEADLINE ALERT 

  • ESSAYS AND PRESENTATIONS DUE DECEMBER 12.

 DECEMBER

WEEK OF DECEMBER 17

PRESENTATION SCHEDULE:

Monday, December 17:               Pd. 2 – Austin DeGiorgio Memorial (Sarah, Miranda, Claire and Jenn)

                                                               Pd. 4 – Brinks Memorial (R.J., Alan, Aryan and Martin) 

Review participles and participial phrases and commas. 

Tuesday, December 18:              Pd. 2 – Old 76 House (Sejal, Wendy, Aideen F. and Morgan) 

                                                               Pd. 4 – Megan Leavey Memorial (Jess P. and Lindsey) 

Wednesday, December 19:       Pd. 2 – Brinks Memorial (Jimmy, Josh, J.P. Cole and Robert) 

                                                                Pd. 4 – USS Maine Memorial ( Jess R., Lauren and Liz) 

Thursday, December 20:           Pd. 2 – Haverstraw Bay Memorial (Casey, Aideen D. Sydney).

                                                                Pd. 4 – Burton Memorial (Jillian and Lucy) 

Quiz on participial phrases and commas. 

Friday, December 21:                         Holiday Party! 

 

WEEK OF DECEMBER 10:

Monday, December 10: Poetry collaborative groups wrap up. 

Tuesday, December 11: Students work in class on their M and M presentations and essays.

Wednesday, December 12: Presentations and essays due. Informal poetry presentations.

Socratic Seminar on Friday. Type up two answers to questions for each poem we explored today. All questions due on Friday. No handwritten or late Socratic seminar notes accepted.

Thursday, December 13: Informal poetry presentations.

Friday, December 14: Socratic Seminar. All typed notes due.

 

WEEK OF DECEMBER 17

Monday, December 17: Grammar lesson on participles. Monument and Memorial presentations.

Tuesday, December 18: Monument and Memorial presentations.

Wednesday, December 19:Monument and Memorial presentations.

Thursday, December 20: Monument and Memorial presentations. Edit quiz on participles.  

Friday, December 21: Holiday party! View a short video clip (5 minutes) on Confederate monuments. https://www.pbs.org/newshour/show/shifting-history-confederate-monuments

 

Monday, December 3: M and M charts due.  Introduction to poetry as argument – monument and memorial poetry groups.

Tuesday, December 4: Poetry groups meet to research, SOAPSStone, discuss and prepare for informal presentation and seminar.

Wednesday, December 5: Grammar lesson #5 on prepositional phrases. Poetry groups meet to research, SOAPSStone, discuss and prepare for seminar. Three Socratic seminar questions due.

Thursday, December 6: Review of prepositional phrases. Informal presentations and share out of seminar questions.

Friday, December 7: Edit quiz on prepositional phrases.  Socratic seminar on memorial poems. Typed responses to six questions of your choice due. Be prepared to discuss all the poems.

 

Week of November 26

Monday, November 26: FIELD TRIP. Bring an umbrella! HW: Respond thoughtfully to the following questions (you should have these on your phone). 1. What is the memorial’s argument?  2. What messages do the visual elements convey? 3. How does it establish ethos and appeal to pathos and logos?

Tuesday, November 27: HW due: See above. Debrief and wrap up “Stones and Bones.”  HW: Work on your M and M project.

Wednesday, November 28: Finish reading and discussing “Stones and Bones.”

HW: Work on your M and M project.

Thursday, November 29: In class: students view Monument and Memorial student exemplar presentations and view a short video clip (5 minutes) on Confederate monuments. https://www.pbs.org/newshour/show/shifting-history-confederate-monuments

Presentation on visual rhetoric.

Introduce and review nonrestrictive clauses and comma usage.

HW: Work on your M and M project. Review your notes for Friday’s grammar quiz.Grammar quiz tomorrow. 

Friday, November 30: Edit quiz # 4 on nonrestrictive clauses. HW: M and M CHARTS DUE MONDAY. 

 

Monday, December 3:  Introduction to poetry as argument

Poetry as argument 12H Memorial poems

Week of November 19

Monday, November 19: Review Goldberger’s “Shaping the Void.”  HW: Work on your M and M project.

Consider what this piece is teaching the reader about monuments. What big idea is Goldberger getting at by using juxtaposition?

Tuesday, November 20: Small groups read Adam Gopnick’s “Stones and Bones” and experiment with word sorting. HW: Work on your M and M project.

Wednesday, November 21: Small groups read Adam Gopnick’s “Stones and Bones” and view The 9/11 Museum: Curating memories of terror and tragedy (13 minutes) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=loSobg8r3PU    

HW: Work on your M and M project.

Happy Thanksgiving, all!

 

 

 

Thursday, November 1:  – NY Times assignment due.

Ad HW due. Consider the following: What is its argument?

Who is the speaker? The audience?

How does it establish ethos?

How are logos and pathos created?

 

Friday, November 2: Edit entrance slip quiz. Discuss Budweiser ad.

HW due Wednesday: JFK’s inaugural speech read, annotated and  questions answered.

Monday, November 5: Review and analyze Dodge Ram ad. Be sure you have read this article and viewed this video:

View the Official Ram Trucks Super Bowl Commercial linked here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SlbY1tGARUA

Also view: Super Bowl Ads Aim for the Heart to Hit the Wallet 

And read: Dodge Ram NY Times https://nyti.ms/2FLjjXe

Tuesday, November 6: Superintendent Conference Day

Wednesday, November 7: JFK speech due (annotated and questions).

Rhetorical device quiz on Friday, November 9.

 

Tuesday and Wednesday, November 13 and 14:

Read, annotate and soapstone  “Shaping the Void” and answer questions. Be prepared to commit to a monument or memorial for your project.

Thursday, November 15: Discuss “Shaping” and begin work on your project. HW due Monday: Read, annotate and soapstone “Stones and Bones” by Adam Gopnick.

Friday, November 16: Begin small group reading of Gopnick piece.

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2014/07/07/stones-and-bones

October Essential Questions:

  • What is rhetoric and how is it used to communicate, inform, entertain and manipulate?

  • What is literary style, and how do its components (diction, syntax and other rhetorical devices) contribute to meaning and tone?

Week of October 1

HERE ARE OUR QUESTIONS FOR MONDAY’S SOCRATIC SEMINAR. YOUR RESPONSES NEEDN’T BE LONG, BUT THEY SHOULD REFLECT DEEP THOUGHT AND ENGAGEMENT WITH THE NOVEL (notes will comprise half your seminar grade). YOUR NOTES MUST BE TYPED. YOU CAN USE THEM DURING THE SEMINAR AND THEY AND WILL BE COLLECTED AFTER. No late or hand written notes accepted.

Socratic Seminar Questions period 2:

  1. Consider Sebastian Junger’s descriptions of the brotherhood shared by men in combat. Which characters conform to his idea of brotherhood and which do not? Use evidence from the text to back up your opinion.
  2. Select two individuals featured in the hallucinatory shoreline scene at the end of “On the Rainy River.” Do some quick research on these figures (Saint George, Jane Fonda, etc.) and hypothesize as to why they are included in O’Brien’s vision.
  3. Why are there so many different portrayals and dramatizations of war in television and film? Would you say that American culture is obsessed with war? Why or why not? How do you personally interpret these representations?
  4. Given what you’ve learned about war from the novel and videos, do you feel films falsify the realities of the war? What are the consequences of this?
  5. How would you feel about a metafictional war novel written by an individual who has not served? Would that make a difference for you? How so or why not?
  6. How does O’Brien’s tone communicate his anti-war sentiments? Use evidence from the text to back up your ideas. You may want to consider his uncertainty about courage and character, as well as the events he references in the rhetorical questions on page 38 (look up, for instance, SEATO and the USS Maddox.)
  7. What details does Tim O’Brien (the character) communicate in “On the Rainy River” that undermine his reliability as a narrator? How does his mental state affect the way you read this story?
  8. Identify a tangible object you carry that illuminates who you are. What is it, and what does it say about you? What  intangible concept do you carry that also captures who you are at this point in your life?
  9. How do O’Brien’s paradoxes correlate to the ethical dilemmas the characters struggle with? Use evidence from the text to support your ideas.
  10.  Reread the last page of “Spin.” What does this metafiction moment reveal about Tim O’Brien (the writer’s) purpose in writing this novel? In what way does the act of writing “spin” time and make the past present?

Socratic Seminar Questions period 4:

1.What is it that draws people to enlist in the military? What life events or background might contribute to an individual making this choice? What did you learn from the TED talk that helped you understand why people enlist?

2. Do you think the experience of  “brotherhood” is different for women in the military? Do women process the events of war in a different way than their male counterparts?

3. How does O’Brien’s decision to switch point of view during “On the Rainy River” affects the mood of the story and the reader? Does it create a more dramatic and intense moment? How would the short story be different without it?

4. Reread the passages in “The Things They Carried” and “On the Rainy River” that employ polysyndeton. Why might O’Brien have chosen to craft such long, continuous sentences? How does his style in these passages mirror an concept or idea?

5. Select two individuals featured in the hallucinatory shoreline scene at the end of “On the Rainy River.” Do some quick research on these figures (Saint George, Jane Fonda, etc.) and hypothesize as to why they are included in O’Brien’s vision.

6. Relating back to Junger’s Ted Talk, do you think there are better ways to help soldiers transitions back into life? Should they have to live on a base for a period of time before they are able to life on their own?

7. Do films like Platoon, Apocalypse Now, Hurt Locker and American Sniper (to name a few) affect people’s perception of the truth of war?  

8. Find an example of antithesis (use evidence) and explore how this contributes to O’Brien’s style, purpose and message.

9. Identify a tangible object you carry that illuminates who you are. What is it and what does it say about you? What  intangible concept do you carry that also captures who you are at this point in your life?

10.Reread the last page of “Spin.” What does this metafiction moment reveal about Tim O’Brien (the writer’s) purpose in writing this novel? In what way does the act of writing “spin” time and make the past present?

 

Monday, October 1: SOCRATIC SEMINAR  on TTTC, Love, Spin and On the Rainy River. Typed responses to all seminar questions due today. ALL STUDENTS MUST BE PRESENT TO PARTICIPATE AND EARN 30 POINTS.

Blog post of your choice due on Wednesday, October 10 at 3pm. See rubric linked here for expectations.

12H blog rubric

Tuesday, October 2: Creative writing exercise using the tangible and intangible.

Wednesday, October 3: Tips for revising your college essays – style lessons from TTTC. Edit lesson one – edit entrance slip on Friday. Look over your notes and be sure you understand compound sentences for Friday’s quiz/entrance slip.

Thursday, October 4: Decoding media bias. In class, we will preview Allsides.com and jot down your responses. What story did you click into? What did you learn about bias and language? What surprised you? https://www.allsides.com/unbiased-balanced-news

Keep your upcoming blog post in mind as you work today.

Friday, October 5: Edit entrance slip on commas and compound sentences. HW: View the assigned clips from the PBS Newshour on Social Media.

https://www.pbs.org/newshour/science/miles-to-go-podcast-takes-a-behind-the-scenes-tour-of-junk-news  (CLIP 1 – 11 minutes).

Play at least one game of Bad Newshttps://www.getbadnews.com/#intro

HW due Tuesday: Print, read and annotate the following article: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-ultimate-cure-for-the-fake-news-epidemic-will-be-more-skeptical-readers/ Be prepared to discuss in class.

ALSO – FINISH VIEWING THIS EXCERPT FROM THE PBS NEWSHOUR, WHICH WILL CONTRIBUTE TO YOUR IDEAS ON THE JUNK NEWS BLOG POST: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f8u8k_4VrlA

Blog post of your choice due on Thursday, October 11 at 4 pm. 

Week of October 8

Monday, October 8: SCHOOL CLOSED FOR COLUMBUS DAY.

Tuesday, October 9: HW due today: Print, read and annotate the following article: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-ultimate-cure-for-the-fake-news-epidemic-will-be-more-skeptical-readers/

Be prepared to discuss in class.  In class – view this clip from ABC News and Buzzfeed: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bE1KWpoX9Hk

Wednesday, October 10: Work on blog post, which is due tomorrow at 4 pm. 

Students read LOC Chapter 1 (as well as Diction, Tone and Syntax hand out) and take notes on preparation for quiz on Monday, October 15. (Matching quiz. APPROX. 30 points.)

 

Thursday, October 11: Lesson on reading laterally and spotting bias and misinformation. HERE IS THE PPT: 12H Fake news-1gu154l

Edit lesson two  on commas and introductory dependent clauses. Edit entrance slip on Friday.

HW: Blog post and responses due at 4 pm sharp. Late posts will not post.

Bring your textbook – as I wrap up the last college essays, you will read Chapter one and take notes in preparation for Monday’s quiz. 

Friday, October 12:Edit entrance slip on commas and  introductory dependent clauses.

 

WEEK OF OCTOBER 15 

Monday, October 15: Quiz on LOC Chapter 1.

Be sure to have your textbook.

In class, we will review reading laterally, set up our glossary and begin to discuss the rhetorical triangle. Bring your textbook for tomorrow. 

Tuesday, October 16: Focus on Lou Gehrig’s speech, completing a SOAPStone chart. Preview the following clip:

Wednesday, October 17: In class: Read and annotate and SOAPStone “Other Men’s Flowers.”  Capture unfamiliar terms and record them in your glossary.

Use this site (you may use your phones responsibly) to define the unfamiliar, gnarly words: http://rhetoric.byu.edu/

Thursday, October 18: Review “OMF” and terms. Introduction to visual rhetoric. View and analyze the Budweiser 9/11 tribute, which aired during the SuperBowl https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LyP0JsyvYnA

Friday, October 19: View and discuss Bush’s 9/11 speech.

HW: Read and annotate and SOAPStone President Obama’s Bin Laden speech. NOTICE RHETORICAL DEVICES. HIGHLIGHT and color code ELP. 

Week of October 22:

Monday, October 22: HW due: President Obama’s speech. See above. In class: We will finish analyzing President Bush’s 9/11 speech and begin Obama’s speech.

Tuesday, October 23: Speeches and “Other Men’s Flowers.” HW due Thursday: Read, annotate and Soapstone Frank Bruni’s “The Dangerous Safety of College.” (See link below.) View the following: My College Transition” by Emery Bergmann: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oAUcoadqRlE

Wednesday, October 24: Early release – college day/PSAT day.

Thursday, October 25: Wrap up Obama speech. Discuss Bruni article. HW due Monday: Read, annotate and Soapstone “What’s the Point of College?” Preview of next week’s edit quiz on restrictive clauses. (Edit entrance quiz on Friday, November 2).

Friday, October 26: BRING YOUR PRINTED NY TIMES ARTICLE TO CLASS. In class, students will work on their NY Times analysis paper. Early submissions (paper and typed SOAPStone chart) must be shared with Ms. DiSavino (mdisavino@ccsd.edu) by 11 AM Sunday, October 28. You will turn in your annotated (word families, rhetorical devices, highlighted according to assignment) on Monday.

HW due Monday: Read, annotate and SOAPStone the Appiah article: “What’s the Point of College?”

Look for a print ad that you find interesting. Analyze for ELP. You will bring this to class on Tuesday, October 30th.

 

Week of October 29:

Monday, October 29: Discuss Bruni’s “The Dangerous Safety of College.” Begin to discuss  “What is the Point of College?”

HW: Work on your NY Times assignment, which is due on Thursday, November 1.

HW due Thursday: Find an persuasive advertisement from a magazine or other print source. Select one that you can use to analyze ELP.

Tuesday, October 3o: Review restrictive clauses and “What is the Point of College?”

HW due Wednesday: Preview this Budweiser ad and consider how it uses the rhetorical appeals. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U1qEZHhJubY   What is its argument? Who is the speaker? How does it establish ethos? How are logos and pathos created?

Review your notes for Friday’s grammar entrance quiz.

Work on your NY Times assignment.

Wednesday, October 31. Introduction to Visual Rhetoric. Be prepared to discuss the Budweiser ad linked above.

HW: Work on your NY Times assignment, which is due tomorrow.

Due Friday: View the Official Ram Trucks Super Bowl Commercial linked here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SlbY1tGARUA

Also view: Super Bowl Ads Aim for the Heart to Hit the Wallet 

And read: Dodge Ram NY Times https://nyti.ms/2FLjjXe

We will view and discuss below “What MLK Actually Said…” in class.

 

Thursday, November 1:  – NY Times assignment due. 

Ad HW due. Consider the following: What is its argument?

Who is the speaker? The audience? 

How does it establish ethos?

How are logos and pathos created?

 

Friday, November 2: Edit entrance slip quiz. Discuss Budweiser ad.

HW due Wednesday: JFK’s inaugural speech read, annotated and  questions answered.

Monday, November 5: Review and analyze Dodge Ram ad. Be sure you have read this article and viewed this video:

View the Official Ram Trucks Super Bowl Commercial linked here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SlbY1tGARUA

Also view: Super Bowl Ads Aim for the Heart to Hit the Wallet 

And read: Dodge Ram NY Times https://nyti.ms/2FLjjXe

Tuesday, November 6: Superintendent Conference Day

Wednesday, November 7: JFK speech due (annotated and questions).

Rhetorical device quiz on Friday, November 9.

 

 

 

 

“The Dangerous Safety of College” by Frank Bruni: https://nyti.ms/2mxCRHW

“What is the Point of College?” by Kwame Anthony Appiah: https://nyti.ms/1QlGgQh

“The Real Campus Scourge” by Frank Bruni: https://nyti.ms/2xFDPVX

 

September Essential Questions:

  • What is “story truth” and how can it be truer than “happening truth”?

  • How can we discern what is real in this era of fake news?

  • How do social media platforms curate “truth”?

  • Who/what decides what makes it to the top of our newsfeeds?

  • How can we be our own arbiters of truth?

     

Week of September 3th

Wednesday, September 5– Welcome back! Introductions, review of syllabus, questionnaires.

Thursday, September 6 – Signed contract, attendance sheet and completed questionnaires due.  Review plagiarism definitions.

Friday, September 7 – Signed plagiarism forms due. Get to know each other and preview some 12H topics during our “speed chatting” activity.

HOMEWORK DUE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12: Read and annotate college essay exemplars.

Here is the link to Common App.org:https://www.commonapp.org/whats-appening/application-updates/2018-2019-common-application-essay-prompts

As you work on/perfect your essay, keep the following in mind (from the Common Application site):

Often, the best writing sections showcase a student’s willingness to be challenged to become a more engaged learner and citizen.

College essay drafts due Friday, September 14.  Early essays will receive 3 bonus points.

Here are some links you may find helpful as you work on your college essay:

How to Conquer the Admissions Essay: https://nyti.ms/2hnhF6C

The Essay, an Exercise in Doubt: https://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/02/16/the-essay-an-exercise-in-doubt/?_r=1

Week of September 12:

Wednesday, September 12: Be sure to bring in any remaining forms (attendance, plagiarism, etc.).

Students log into blog. Annotations of college essays due. Distribute The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien.

Discussion of our takeaways from reading the exemplars.

View Frank Bruni on his book: Where you Go is Not Who You’ll Be. : https://www.thirteen.org/metrofocus/2017/08/august-25-2017-frank-advice-bruni

HW: College essay drafts due Friday. Include the prompt and word count on your printed, double spaced essay.

Thursday, September 13: Introduction to metafiction – beginning TTTC. Review of TTTC packet which will guide you in note taking that will inform class discussions. As you read the selected stories (“The Things They Carried,” “Love,” “Spin,” and “On the Rainy River”) keep in mind the stylistic elements we will focus on – O’Brien’s use of sentence variety, the tangible and intangible, imagery, etc.

HW due Monday: Read the title story, take notes and be ready to participate in Monday’s discussion.

Friday, September 14: College essay drafts due. Schedule consults. Listen to Tim O’Brien discuss his novel and begin reading. Be sure to take notes on characters and significant plot points. Don’t be surprised by a reading quiz.

Week of September 17:

Monday, September 17: Turn in our college essay. Enjoy our metafiction story time. Read and take notes (due tomorrow) while I consult with individual writers. HW: TTTC notes on “TTTC,” “Love” and “Spin” due tomorrow.

Tuesday, September 18: HW due: TTTC notes. Share out our observations on TTTC thus far and discuss observations.

YOM KIPPUR – NO CLASSES WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19

Thursday, September 20: College essay consultations. Students read “On the Rainy River” watching for the motifs of edges and boundaries.

Friday, September 21: College essay consultations. Students read “On the Rainy River” watching for the motifs of edges and boundaries.

Week of September 24:

Monday, September 24: HW due: Notes for “On the Rainy River.” Be sure to use the discussed format. Notes must be complete to receive credit.

In class: review and discuss O’Brien’s novel up to Rainy River. Don’t be surprised by a reading quiz. 

Tuesday, September 25: “On the Rainy River” continued. Introduction to developing generative questions.

Wednesday, September 26: BACK TO SCHOOL NIGHT – please remind parents so I can tell them how fab you all are! 🙂 

Students work in groups to develop Socratic seminar questions. Questions will be presented and selected questions posted on our The Things They Carried page.

Thursday, September 27: Socratic seminar preparation continues.

HW: View Sebastian Junger’s TEDtalk and write a response, noting anything you found thought provoking. Be sure to connect it in some way to our exploration of Tim O’Brien’s novel. This should be a minimum of 5 sentences. https://www.ted.com/talks/sebastian_junger_why_veterans_miss_war?language=en

 

Friday, September 28: Students create generative questions for Socratic seminar. HW: Respond to those questions in writing and print – you may have these notes with you for the seminar. This will be collected and will be a part of your seminar grade.

Week of October 1

HERE ARE OUR QUESTIONS FOR MONDAY’S SOCRATIC SEMINAR. YOUR RESPONSES NEEDN’T BE LONG, BUT THEY SHOULD REFLECT DEEP THOUGHT AND ENGAGEMENT WITH THE NOVEL (notes will comprise half your seminar grade). YOUR NOTES MUST BE TYPED. YOU CAN USE THEM DURING THE SEMINAR AND THEY AND WILL BE COLLECTED AFTER. No late or hand written notes accepted.

Socratic Seminar Questions period 2:

  1. Consider Sebastian Junger’s descriptions of the brotherhood shared by men in combat. Which characters conform to his idea of brotherhood and which do not? Use evidence from the text to back up your opinion.

  2. Select two individuals featured in the hallucinatory shoreline scene at the end of “On the Rainy River.” Do some quick research on these figures (Saint George, Jane Fonda, etc.) and hypothesize as to why they are included in O’Brien’s vision.

  3. Why are there so many different portrayals and dramatizations of war in television and film? Would you say that American culture is obsessed with war? Why or why not? How do you personally interpret these representations?

  4. Given what you’ve learned about war from the novel and videos, do you feel films falsify the realities of the war? What are the consequences of this?

  5. How would you feel about a metafictional war novel written by an individual who has not served? Would that make a difference for you? How so or why not?

  6. How does O’Brien’s tone communicate his anti-war sentiments? Use evidence from the text to back up your ideas. You may want to consider his uncertainty about courage and character, as well as the events he references in the rhetorical questions on page 38 (look up, for instance, SEATO and the USS Maddox.)

  7. What details does Tim O’Brien (the character) communicate in “On the Rainy River” that undermine his reliability as a narrator? How does his mental state affect the way you read this story?

  8. Identify a tangible object you carry that illuminates who you are. What is it, and what does it say about you? What  intangible concept do you carry that also captures who you are at this point in your life?

  9. How do O’Brien’s paradoxes correlate to the ethical dilemmas the characters struggle with? Use evidence from the text to support your ideas.

  10. Reread the last page of “Spin.” What does this metafiction moment reveal about Tim O’Brien (the writer’s) purpose in writing this novel? In what way does the act of writing “spin” time and make the past present? 


Socratic Seminar Questions period 4:

1.What is it that draws people to enlist in the military? What life events or background might contribute to an individual making this choice? What did you learn from the TED talk that helped you understand why people enlist?

2. Do you think the experience of  “brotherhood” is different for women in the military? Do women process the events of war in a different way than their male counterparts?

3. How does O’Brien’s decision to switch point of view during “On the Rainy River” affects the mood of the story and the reader? Does it create a more dramatic and intense moment? How would the short story be different without it?

4. Reread the passages in “The Things They Carried” and “On the Rainy River” that employ polysyndeton. Why might O’Brien have chosen to craft such long, continuous sentences? How does his style in these passages mirror an concept or idea? 

5. Select two individuals featured in the hallucinatory shoreline scene at the end of “On the Rainy River.” Do some quick research on these figures (Saint George, Jane Fonda, etc.) and hypothesize as to why they are included in O’Brien’s vision.

6. Relating back to Junger’s Ted Talk, do you think there are better ways to help soldiers transitions back into life? Should they have to live on a base for a period of time before they are able to life on their own?

7. Do films like Platoon, Apocalypse Now, Hurt Locker and American Sniper (to name a few) affect people’s perception of the truth of war?  

8. Find an example of antithesis (use evidence) and explore how this contributes to O’Brien’s style, purpose and message.

9. Identify a tangible object you carry that illuminates who you are. What is it and what does it say about you? What  intangible concept do you carry that also captures who you are at this point in your life?

10.Reread the last page of “Spin.” What does this metafiction moment reveal about Tim O’Brien (the writer’s) purpose in writing this novel? In what way does the act of writing “spin” time and make the past present? 

 

 

 

Monday, October 1: SOCRATIC SEMINAR  on TTTC, Love, Spin and On the Rainy River. Typed responses to all seminar questions due today. ALL STUDENTS MUST BE PRESENT TO PARTICIPATE AND EARN 30 POINTS.

Blog post of your choice due on Friday, October 5th at 7 am. See rubric linked here for expectations.

12H blog rubric

Tuesday, October 2: Tips for revising your college essays – style lessons from TTTC.

Wednesday, October 3: Edit lesson one – edit entrance slip on Friday. Look over your notes and be sure you understand compound sentences.

Thursday, October 4: Decoding media bias. Preview Allsides.com and jot down your responses. What story did you click into? What did you learn about bias and language? What surprised you? https://www.allsides.com/unbiased-balanced-news

Friday, October 5: Edit entrance slip on commas and compound sentences. HW: View the assigned clips from the PBS Newshour on Social Media.

https://www.pbs.org/newshour/science/miles-to-go-podcast-takes-a-behind-the-scenes-tour-of-junk-news  (CLIP 1 – 11 minutes). 

Play at least one game of Bad Newshttps://www.getbadnews.com/#intro

Week of October 8

Monday, October 8: SCHOOL CLOSED FOR COLUMBUS DAY.

Tuesday, October 9: HW due Thursday: Print, read and annotate the following article: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-ultimate-cure-for-the-fake-news-epidemic-will-be-more-skeptical-readers/

Be prepared to discuss in class. Lesson on reading laterally and spotting bias and misinformation. In class – view this clip from ABC News and Buzzfeed: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bE1KWpoX9Hk

Wednesday, October 10: Work on annotating Scientific American article and upcoming blog post.

Thursday, October 11: In class – share your annotations and work on the upcoming blog post (due Monday, October 15).

Edit lesson two  on commas and introductory dependent clauses. Edit entrance slip on Friday.

Friday, October 12:Edit entrance slip on commas and  introductory dependent clauses. Copies of The Language of Composition distributed. 

 

 

October Essential Questions:

  • What is rhetoric and how is it used to communicate, inform, entertain and manipulate?

  • What is literary style, and how do its components (diction, syntax and other rhetorical devices) contribute to meaning and tone?