Classwork, homework and assignments 2018-2019

Welcome to 12H!

Here is where you will find our daily itinerary, our assignments and essential links.

October Essential Questions:

  • What is rhetoric and how is it used to communicate, inform, entertain and manipulate?

  • What is literary style, and how do its components (diction, syntax and other rhetorical devices) contribute to meaning and tone?

Week of October 1

HERE ARE OUR QUESTIONS FOR MONDAY’S SOCRATIC SEMINAR. YOUR RESPONSES NEEDN’T BE LONG, BUT THEY SHOULD REFLECT DEEP THOUGHT AND ENGAGEMENT WITH THE NOVEL (notes will comprise half your seminar grade). YOUR NOTES MUST BE TYPED. YOU CAN USE THEM DURING THE SEMINAR AND THEY AND WILL BE COLLECTED AFTER. No late or hand written notes accepted.

Socratic Seminar Questions period 2:

  1. Consider Sebastian Junger’s descriptions of the brotherhood shared by men in combat. Which characters conform to his idea of brotherhood and which do not? Use evidence from the text to back up your opinion.
  2. Select two individuals featured in the hallucinatory shoreline scene at the end of “On the Rainy River.” Do some quick research on these figures (Saint George, Jane Fonda, etc.) and hypothesize as to why they are included in O’Brien’s vision.
  3. Why are there so many different portrayals and dramatizations of war in television and film? Would you say that American culture is obsessed with war? Why or why not? How do you personally interpret these representations?
  4. Given what you’ve learned about war from the novel and videos, do you feel films falsify the realities of the war? What are the consequences of this?
  5. How would you feel about a metafictional war novel written by an individual who has not served? Would that make a difference for you? How so or why not?
  6. How does O’Brien’s tone communicate his anti-war sentiments? Use evidence from the text to back up your ideas. You may want to consider his uncertainty about courage and character, as well as the events he references in the rhetorical questions on page 38 (look up, for instance, SEATO and the USS Maddox.)
  7. What details does Tim O’Brien (the character) communicate in “On the Rainy River” that undermine his reliability as a narrator? How does his mental state affect the way you read this story?
  8. Identify a tangible object you carry that illuminates who you are. What is it, and what does it say about you? What  intangible concept do you carry that also captures who you are at this point in your life?
  9. How do O’Brien’s paradoxes correlate to the ethical dilemmas the characters struggle with? Use evidence from the text to support your ideas.
  10.  Reread the last page of “Spin.” What does this metafiction moment reveal about Tim O’Brien (the writer’s) purpose in writing this novel? In what way does the act of writing “spin” time and make the past present?

Socratic Seminar Questions period 4:

1.What is it that draws people to enlist in the military? What life events or background might contribute to an individual making this choice? What did you learn from the TED talk that helped you understand why people enlist?

2. Do you think the experience of  “brotherhood” is different for women in the military? Do women process the events of war in a different way than their male counterparts?

3. How does O’Brien’s decision to switch point of view during “On the Rainy River” affects the mood of the story and the reader? Does it create a more dramatic and intense moment? How would the short story be different without it?

4. Reread the passages in “The Things They Carried” and “On the Rainy River” that employ polysyndeton. Why might O’Brien have chosen to craft such long, continuous sentences? How does his style in these passages mirror an concept or idea?

5. Select two individuals featured in the hallucinatory shoreline scene at the end of “On the Rainy River.” Do some quick research on these figures (Saint George, Jane Fonda, etc.) and hypothesize as to why they are included in O’Brien’s vision.

6. Relating back to Junger’s Ted Talk, do you think there are better ways to help soldiers transitions back into life? Should they have to live on a base for a period of time before they are able to life on their own?

7. Do films like Platoon, Apocalypse Now, Hurt Locker and American Sniper (to name a few) affect people’s perception of the truth of war?  

8. Find an example of antithesis (use evidence) and explore how this contributes to O’Brien’s style, purpose and message.

9. Identify a tangible object you carry that illuminates who you are. What is it and what does it say about you? What  intangible concept do you carry that also captures who you are at this point in your life?

10.Reread the last page of “Spin.” What does this metafiction moment reveal about Tim O’Brien (the writer’s) purpose in writing this novel? In what way does the act of writing “spin” time and make the past present?

 

Monday, October 1: SOCRATIC SEMINAR  on TTTC, Love, Spin and On the Rainy River. Typed responses to all seminar questions due today. ALL STUDENTS MUST BE PRESENT TO PARTICIPATE AND EARN 30 POINTS.

Blog post of your choice due on Wednesday, October 10 at 3pm. See rubric linked here for expectations.

12H blog rubric

Tuesday, October 2: Creative writing exercise using the tangible and intangible.

Wednesday, October 3: Tips for revising your college essays – style lessons from TTTC. Edit lesson one – edit entrance slip on Friday. Look over your notes and be sure you understand compound sentences for Friday’s quiz/entrance slip.

Thursday, October 4: Decoding media bias. In class, we will preview Allsides.com and jot down your responses. What story did you click into? What did you learn about bias and language? What surprised you? https://www.allsides.com/unbiased-balanced-news

Keep your upcoming blog post in mind as you work today.

Friday, October 5: Edit entrance slip on commas and compound sentences. HW: View the assigned clips from the PBS Newshour on Social Media.

https://www.pbs.org/newshour/science/miles-to-go-podcast-takes-a-behind-the-scenes-tour-of-junk-news  (CLIP 1 – 11 minutes).

Play at least one game of Bad Newshttps://www.getbadnews.com/#intro

HW due Tuesday: Print, read and annotate the following article: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-ultimate-cure-for-the-fake-news-epidemic-will-be-more-skeptical-readers/ Be prepared to discuss in class.

ALSO – FINISH VIEWING THIS EXCERPT FROM THE PBS NEWSHOUR, WHICH WILL CONTRIBUTE TO YOUR IDEAS ON THE JUNK NEWS BLOG POST: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f8u8k_4VrlA

Blog post of your choice due on Thursday, October 11 at 4 pm. 

Week of October 8

Monday, October 8: SCHOOL CLOSED FOR COLUMBUS DAY.

Tuesday, October 9: HW due today: Print, read and annotate the following article: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-ultimate-cure-for-the-fake-news-epidemic-will-be-more-skeptical-readers/

Be prepared to discuss in class.  In class – view this clip from ABC News and Buzzfeed: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bE1KWpoX9Hk

Wednesday, October 10: Work on blog post, which is due tomorrow at 4 pm. 

Students read LOC Chapter 1 (as well as Diction, Tone and Syntax hand out) and take notes on preparation for quiz on Monday, October 15. (Matching quiz. APPROX. 30 points.)

 

Thursday, October 11: Lesson on reading laterally and spotting bias and misinformation. HERE IS THE PPT: 12H Fake news-1gu154l

Edit lesson two  on commas and introductory dependent clauses. Edit entrance slip on Friday.

HW: Blog post and responses due at 4 pm sharp. Late posts will not post.

Bring your textbook – as I wrap up the last college essays, you will read Chapter one and take notes in preparation for Monday’s quiz. 

Friday, October 12:Edit entrance slip on commas and  introductory dependent clauses.

 

WEEK OF OCTOBER 15 

Monday, October 15: Quiz on LOC Chapter 1.

Be sure to have your textbook.

In class, we will review reading laterally, set up our glossary and begin to discuss the rhetorical triangle. Bring your textbook for tomorrow. 

Tuesday, October 16: Focus on Lou Gehrig’s speech, completing a SOAPStone chart. Preview the following clip:

Wednesday, October 17: In class: Read and annotate and SOAPStone “Other Men’s Flowers.”  Capture unfamiliar terms and record them in your glossary.

Use this site (you may use your phones responsibly) to define the unfamiliar, gnarly words: http://rhetoric.byu.edu/

Thursday, October 18: Review “OMF” and terms. Introduction to visual rhetoric. View and analyze the Budweiser 9/11 tribute, which aired during the SuperBowl https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LyP0JsyvYnA

Read and annotate and SOAPStone President Bush’s 9/11 speech.

Friday, October 19: View and discuss Bush’s 9/11 speech. HW: Read and annotate Obama’s Bin Laden speech.

 

Upcoming:

“The Dangerous Safety of College” by Frank Bruni: https://nyti.ms/2mxCRHW

“What is the Point of College?” by Kwame Anthony Appiah: https://nyti.ms/1QlGgQh

“The Real Campus Scourge” by Frank Bruni:

My College Transition” by Emery Bergmann: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oAUcoadqRlE

 

September Essential Questions:

  • What is “story truth” and how can it be truer than “happening truth”?

  • How can we discern what is real in this era of fake news?

  • How do social media platforms curate “truth”?

  • Who/what decides what makes it to the top of our newsfeeds?

  • How can we be our own arbiters of truth?

     

Week of September 3th

Wednesday, September 5– Welcome back! Introductions, review of syllabus, questionnaires.

Thursday, September 6 – Signed contract, attendance sheet and completed questionnaires due.  Review plagiarism definitions.

Friday, September 7 – Signed plagiarism forms due. Get to know each other and preview some 12H topics during our “speed chatting” activity.

HOMEWORK DUE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12: Read and annotate college essay exemplars.

Here is the link to Common App.org:https://www.commonapp.org/whats-appening/application-updates/2018-2019-common-application-essay-prompts

As you work on/perfect your essay, keep the following in mind (from the Common Application site):

Often, the best writing sections showcase a student’s willingness to be challenged to become a more engaged learner and citizen.

College essay drafts due Friday, September 14.  Early essays will receive 3 bonus points.

Here are some links you may find helpful as you work on your college essay:

How to Conquer the Admissions Essay: https://nyti.ms/2hnhF6C

The Essay, an Exercise in Doubt: https://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/02/16/the-essay-an-exercise-in-doubt/?_r=1

Week of September 12:

Wednesday, September 12: Be sure to bring in any remaining forms (attendance, plagiarism, etc.).

Students log into blog. Annotations of college essays due. Distribute The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien.

Discussion of our takeaways from reading the exemplars.

View Frank Bruni on his book: Where you Go is Not Who You’ll Be. : https://www.thirteen.org/metrofocus/2017/08/august-25-2017-frank-advice-bruni

HW: College essay drafts due Friday. Include the prompt and word count on your printed, double spaced essay.

Thursday, September 13: Introduction to metafiction – beginning TTTC. Review of TTTC packet which will guide you in note taking that will inform class discussions. As you read the selected stories (“The Things They Carried,” “Love,” “Spin,” and “On the Rainy River”) keep in mind the stylistic elements we will focus on – O’Brien’s use of sentence variety, the tangible and intangible, imagery, etc.

HW due Monday: Read the title story, take notes and be ready to participate in Monday’s discussion.

Friday, September 14: College essay drafts due. Schedule consults. Listen to Tim O’Brien discuss his novel and begin reading. Be sure to take notes on characters and significant plot points. Don’t be surprised by a reading quiz.

Week of September 17:

Monday, September 17: Turn in our college essay. Enjoy our metafiction story time. Read and take notes (due tomorrow) while I consult with individual writers. HW: TTTC notes on “TTTC,” “Love” and “Spin” due tomorrow.

Tuesday, September 18: HW due: TTTC notes. Share out our observations on TTTC thus far and discuss observations.

YOM KIPPUR – NO CLASSES WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19

Thursday, September 20: College essay consultations. Students read “On the Rainy River” watching for the motifs of edges and boundaries.

Friday, September 21: College essay consultations. Students read “On the Rainy River” watching for the motifs of edges and boundaries.

Week of September 24:

Monday, September 24: HW due: Notes for “On the Rainy River.” Be sure to use the discussed format. Notes must be complete to receive credit.

In class: review and discuss O’Brien’s novel up to Rainy River. Don’t be surprised by a reading quiz. 

Tuesday, September 25: “On the Rainy River” continued. Introduction to developing generative questions.

Wednesday, September 26: BACK TO SCHOOL NIGHT – please remind parents so I can tell them how fab you all are! 🙂 

Students work in groups to develop Socratic seminar questions. Questions will be presented and selected questions posted on our The Things They Carried page.

Thursday, September 27: Socratic seminar preparation continues.

HW: View Sebastian Junger’s TEDtalk and write a response, noting anything you found thought provoking. Be sure to connect it in some way to our exploration of Tim O’Brien’s novel. This should be a minimum of 5 sentences. https://www.ted.com/talks/sebastian_junger_why_veterans_miss_war?language=en

 

Friday, September 28: Students create generative questions for Socratic seminar. HW: Respond to those questions in writing and print – you may have these notes with you for the seminar. This will be collected and will be a part of your seminar grade.

Week of October 1

HERE ARE OUR QUESTIONS FOR MONDAY’S SOCRATIC SEMINAR. YOUR RESPONSES NEEDN’T BE LONG, BUT THEY SHOULD REFLECT DEEP THOUGHT AND ENGAGEMENT WITH THE NOVEL (notes will comprise half your seminar grade). YOUR NOTES MUST BE TYPED. YOU CAN USE THEM DURING THE SEMINAR AND THEY AND WILL BE COLLECTED AFTER. No late or hand written notes accepted.

Socratic Seminar Questions period 2:

  1. Consider Sebastian Junger’s descriptions of the brotherhood shared by men in combat. Which characters conform to his idea of brotherhood and which do not? Use evidence from the text to back up your opinion.

  2. Select two individuals featured in the hallucinatory shoreline scene at the end of “On the Rainy River.” Do some quick research on these figures (Saint George, Jane Fonda, etc.) and hypothesize as to why they are included in O’Brien’s vision.

  3. Why are there so many different portrayals and dramatizations of war in television and film? Would you say that American culture is obsessed with war? Why or why not? How do you personally interpret these representations?

  4. Given what you’ve learned about war from the novel and videos, do you feel films falsify the realities of the war? What are the consequences of this?

  5. How would you feel about a metafictional war novel written by an individual who has not served? Would that make a difference for you? How so or why not?

  6. How does O’Brien’s tone communicate his anti-war sentiments? Use evidence from the text to back up your ideas. You may want to consider his uncertainty about courage and character, as well as the events he references in the rhetorical questions on page 38 (look up, for instance, SEATO and the USS Maddox.)

  7. What details does Tim O’Brien (the character) communicate in “On the Rainy River” that undermine his reliability as a narrator? How does his mental state affect the way you read this story?

  8. Identify a tangible object you carry that illuminates who you are. What is it, and what does it say about you? What  intangible concept do you carry that also captures who you are at this point in your life?

  9. How do O’Brien’s paradoxes correlate to the ethical dilemmas the characters struggle with? Use evidence from the text to support your ideas.

  10. Reread the last page of “Spin.” What does this metafiction moment reveal about Tim O’Brien (the writer’s) purpose in writing this novel? In what way does the act of writing “spin” time and make the past present? 


Socratic Seminar Questions period 4:

1.What is it that draws people to enlist in the military? What life events or background might contribute to an individual making this choice? What did you learn from the TED talk that helped you understand why people enlist?

2. Do you think the experience of  “brotherhood” is different for women in the military? Do women process the events of war in a different way than their male counterparts?

3. How does O’Brien’s decision to switch point of view during “On the Rainy River” affects the mood of the story and the reader? Does it create a more dramatic and intense moment? How would the short story be different without it?

4. Reread the passages in “The Things They Carried” and “On the Rainy River” that employ polysyndeton. Why might O’Brien have chosen to craft such long, continuous sentences? How does his style in these passages mirror an concept or idea? 

5. Select two individuals featured in the hallucinatory shoreline scene at the end of “On the Rainy River.” Do some quick research on these figures (Saint George, Jane Fonda, etc.) and hypothesize as to why they are included in O’Brien’s vision.

6. Relating back to Junger’s Ted Talk, do you think there are better ways to help soldiers transitions back into life? Should they have to live on a base for a period of time before they are able to life on their own?

7. Do films like Platoon, Apocalypse Now, Hurt Locker and American Sniper (to name a few) affect people’s perception of the truth of war?  

8. Find an example of antithesis (use evidence) and explore how this contributes to O’Brien’s style, purpose and message.

9. Identify a tangible object you carry that illuminates who you are. What is it and what does it say about you? What  intangible concept do you carry that also captures who you are at this point in your life?

10.Reread the last page of “Spin.” What does this metafiction moment reveal about Tim O’Brien (the writer’s) purpose in writing this novel? In what way does the act of writing “spin” time and make the past present? 

 

 

 

Monday, October 1: SOCRATIC SEMINAR  on TTTC, Love, Spin and On the Rainy River. Typed responses to all seminar questions due today. ALL STUDENTS MUST BE PRESENT TO PARTICIPATE AND EARN 30 POINTS.

Blog post of your choice due on Friday, October 5th at 7 am. See rubric linked here for expectations.

12H blog rubric

Tuesday, October 2: Tips for revising your college essays – style lessons from TTTC.

Wednesday, October 3: Edit lesson one – edit entrance slip on Friday. Look over your notes and be sure you understand compound sentences.

Thursday, October 4: Decoding media bias. Preview Allsides.com and jot down your responses. What story did you click into? What did you learn about bias and language? What surprised you? https://www.allsides.com/unbiased-balanced-news

Friday, October 5: Edit entrance slip on commas and compound sentences. HW: View the assigned clips from the PBS Newshour on Social Media.

https://www.pbs.org/newshour/science/miles-to-go-podcast-takes-a-behind-the-scenes-tour-of-junk-news  (CLIP 1 – 11 minutes). 

Play at least one game of Bad Newshttps://www.getbadnews.com/#intro

Week of October 8

Monday, October 8: SCHOOL CLOSED FOR COLUMBUS DAY.

Tuesday, October 9: HW due Thursday: Print, read and annotate the following article: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-ultimate-cure-for-the-fake-news-epidemic-will-be-more-skeptical-readers/

Be prepared to discuss in class. Lesson on reading laterally and spotting bias and misinformation. In class – view this clip from ABC News and Buzzfeed: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bE1KWpoX9Hk

Wednesday, October 10: Work on annotating Scientific American article and upcoming blog post.

Thursday, October 11: In class – share your annotations and work on the upcoming blog post (due Monday, October 15).

Edit lesson two  on commas and introductory dependent clauses. Edit entrance slip on Friday.

Friday, October 12:Edit entrance slip on commas and  introductory dependent clauses. Copies of The Language of Composition distributed. 

 

 

October Essential Questions:

  • What is rhetoric and how is it used to communicate, inform, entertain and manipulate?

  • What is literary style, and how do its components (diction, syntax and other rhetorical devices) contribute to meaning and tone?